Yom Shekulo Shabbat – Steve McConnell

 
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Kaduri students confess Yeshua (Jesus) LIVE ON CAMERA.I Messianic Rabbi Zev Porat

 
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To The Jew First – The New Covenant is for Israel – Dr. Todd Baker Zola Levitt Ministries Staff Theologian

She eagerly accepted a copy of the Hebrew Bible with the New Testament, and also
some Messianic Gospel tracts that explain how a Jewish person can accept Yeshua as the Jewish Messiah and still be a Jew. There’s no “conversion” involved. Jews can—and should—trust that Yeshua is the Messiah.

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On the latest To The Jew First (TJF) Gospel outreach in Israel, team member
August Rosado and I watched, once again, as the Holy Spirit of God
opened doors to witness about Yeshua the Messiah to the Jewish people.
One powerful day comes to mind.

As August and I were leaving the Kotel (Western Wall) after prayer, a
young Jewish man eating his lunch greeted us as we walked by. Sensing
that the Lord wanted us to engage this young Israeli, August and I stopped to
chat with Tal while he was on his lunch break from his job at an archaeologicaldig nearby.

In the course of our conversation, Tal casually admitted that he was an
atheist. I gently pointed out that he was actually an agnostic, because no
one can know with absolute certainty that God does not exist. Man simply lacks the power, knowledge, and physical means to make such a claim. Tal agreed.

Now on common footing, I shared with Tal about my former life as an
unenlightened atheist. I told him that when the Son of God supernaturally
revealed Himself to me, He led me to the Scriptures and convinced me that everything that Yeshua said and did in the New Testament was absolutely true.

August and I then challenged Tal to take a copy of the Scriptures—both the Old and New Testaments—in Hebrew to see this saving truth for himself. Tal initially
balked at our invitation, but after the Holy Spirit persuaded him, Tal accepted the
Bible in order to test his agnosticism in the light of God’s Word.

After we left Tal, August and I encountered two young Israeli women raising money for an Israel Defense Forces (IDF) charity. August spoke with one of the women, while
I shared the Gospel with the other, Bathsheva. I told Bathsheva about a new covenant that was promised in the Tanakh, or Old Testament, to Israel in Jeremiah 31:31–37.

Then I related it to Yeshua, the One who ratified this covenant in the B’rit Hadashah,
or New Testament (Matthew 26:28). Bathsheva immediately understood the clear connection between the two Testaments of the Jewish Bible. From talking to her, I could see that Bathsheva had a good, working understanding of the Tanakh from
her Orthodox Jewish upbringing.

But this was the first time she’d heard about the New Covenant for
Israel being prophesied, or even mentioned, in the Tanakh! She expressed a genuine interest to learn more about the Messiah, the Messenger of the New Covenant. She eagerly accepted a copy of the Hebrew Bible with the New Testament, and also
some Messianic Gospel tracts that explain how a Jewish person can accept Yeshua as the Jewish Messiah and still be a Jew. There’s no “conversion” involved. Jews can—and
should—trust that Yeshua is the Messiah. (Click to Site)

Faith vs. Legalism

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As a Messianic Jew I am not liked by anyone. My Jewish brothers and sisters tell me that because I believe “in Jesus” (almost none of them really understand what that means) I am no longer Jewish; on the other side, because I follow Torah (as best as I can) and maintain a “Jewish” worship and lifestyle, my brothers and sisters in Messiah tell me I am legalistic and not really saved because I am “under the law” and not “under the blood.”

Both are just so very, very wrong.

Shaul (AKA Paul, that nice Jewish tent maker from Tarsus) tells us in Romans, Chapter 4 all about legalism and faith. He begins at the beginning, with Abraham, and identifies how the Tanakh confirms that Abraham was considered righteous because he believed what God told him would happen. That faithfulness, demonstrated by Abraham believing in what hadn’t yet happened, was why God credited him with righteousness. There was no task he accomplished, or behavior he performed, other than believing.

But that wasn’t all: Abraham did more than just believe. He did all the things that God told him to do, without hesitation or complaint. He left his father’s house, he left his neighbors, his home…everything he knew and was comfortable with, and took everyone and everything he owned to…he had no idea where.

When God told him to cut up animals and lay them out, he did that and remained out in the heat of the day, shooing away the birds.

When God said to circumcise himself and everyone else, he did it that day.

When God said to take Isaac and sacrifice him, he left early the very next morning.

Whatever God said to do, he did.

So, even though Abraham’s righteousness came from trusting faithfulness in what God said, he also spent his life doing what God told him to do.  We call that obedience.

Going back to Romans 4, Shaul points out that circumcision had nothing to do with Abraham’s righteousness because the righteousness was credited before he was circumcised; because of that, Gentiles who are not circumcised can be saved without undergoing the procedure, but if one chooses to do so, as an act of obedience, it doesn’t mean that person is being legalistic.

The difference between legalism and faith is simply the reason for performing the act: if I do what is in the Torah because I want to obey God, that is not legalism. If I do what is in the Torah to make me righteous, I am being legalistic. Of course, if I can obey Torah perfectly, I will be made righteous by doing so; the problem with that scenario is that no one can obey Torah perfectly. Therefore, there has to be a better way. We call that way “Grace”, God’s forgiveness for our sins, which is possible through believing in Yeshua, whose sacrifice replaced the need to bring a sacrifice to the temple in Jerusalem to have our sins forgiven.

This is why Yeshua had to die: because the temple wasn’t going to exist, which means the sacrificial system God created for us in the Torah would no longer be available, Yeshua’s sacrifice replaced needing the temple to receive forgiveness of sin. (Click to Article)