‘Unstoppable’ Super Typhoon Trami is closing in on mainland Japan with violent 134mph winds set to rip through the nation over the weekend

  • Super Typhoon Trami is about 186 miles (300 km) southeast of Miyako island
  • The typhoon is forecast to pick up speed and approach western Japan on Sunday
  • It is the latest storm to threaten Japan in a year filled with natural disasters
  • Less than a month ago, a typhoon flooded Kansai International airport

A large, very strong typhoon is set to rip through mainland Japan over the weekend, bringing violent winds and torrential rain.

The ‘unstoppable’ Super Typhoon Trami, which is rated category 2 by Tropical Storm Risk, with category 5 the highest, has destructive winds gusting at speeds as high as 134 mph (216kmh).

It is the latest storm to threaten Japan in a year filled with more than the usual number of disasters, including punishing heat, heavy rains and landslides.

Less than a month ago, a typhoon flooded Kansai International airport near Osaka, leaving thousands of tourists stranded.

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A large, very strong typhoon (pictured) is set to rip through mainland Japan over the weekend, bringing violent winds and torrential rain

A large, very strong typhoon (pictured) is set to rip through mainland Japan over the weekend, bringing violent winds and torrential rain

Trami is currently about 186 miles (300km) southeast of Miyako island.

Although the Japanese capital of Tokyo is set for heavy rain, current predictions show it avoiding a direct hit.

‘As it is forecast to go across Japan at a high speed, we are urging people to be vigilant’ in the days ahead, Sakiko Nishioka from the meteorological agency told AFP.

‘Please be on high alert against violent winds, high waves and heavy rainfall,’ the agency said in a statement.

After dumping torrential rain on the outlying islands, the typhoon is forecast to pick up speed and approach western Japan on Sunday, remaining very strong as it barrels over the mainland.

Images from the International Space Station posted on Twitter by astronaut Alexander Gerst on Tuesday showed Trami’s enormous eye which he said was ‘as if somebody pulled the planet’s gigantic plug’.

‘Staring down the eye of yet another fierce storm… Trami is unstoppable and heading for Japan and Taiwan. Be safe down there!’ he wrote.

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Churning north across Okinawa on Saturday, Trami is then predicted to rake across the islands of Kyushu and the main island of Honshu on Sunday, a path similar to that taken by typhoon Jebi early in September

The 'unstoppable' Super Typhoon Trami, which is rated category 2 by Tropical Storm Risk, with category 5 the highest, has destructive winds gusting at speeds as high as 134 mph (216kmh)

The ‘unstoppable’ Super Typhoon Trami, which is rated category 2 by Tropical Storm Risk, with category 5 the highest, has destructive winds gusting at speeds as high as 134 mph (216kmh)

Japan’s main two airlines JAL and ANA have already started to cancel some domestic flights, scrapping more than 100 between them to the islands.

If the forecast holds, it will be the latest in a series of extreme natural events to strike Japan.

Jebi, the most powerful storm to hit Japan in 25 years, brought some of the highest tides since a 1961 typhoon and flooded Kansai airport near Osaka, taking it out of service for days.

Images from the International Space Station posted on Twitter by astronaut Alexander Gerst on Tuesday showed Trami's enormous eye which he said was 'as if somebody pulled the planet's gigantic plug'

Images from the International Space Station posted on Twitter by astronaut Alexander Gerst on Tuesday showed Trami’s enormous eye which he said was ‘as if somebody pulled the planet’s gigantic plug’

'Staring down the eye of yet another fierce storm... Super Typhoon Trami is unstoppable and heading for Japan and Taiwan. Be safe down there!' Mr Gerst wrote

‘Staring down the eye of yet another fierce storm… Super Typhoon Trami is unstoppable and heading for Japan and Taiwan. Be safe down there!’ Mr Gerst wrote

Trami (pictured) is about 186 miles southeast of Miyako island, with winds gusting as high as 134 mph. If the forecast holds, it will be the latest in a series of natural events to strike Japan

Trami (pictured) is about 186 miles southeast of Miyako island, with winds gusting as high as 134 mph. If the forecast holds, it will be the latest in a series of natural events to strike Japan

Seventeen people died in the storm, whose high winds sent trees crashing to the ground and cars scudding across parking lots.

Even for a nation accustomed to disasters, this year has been hard for Japan, starting with a volcanic eruption in January that rained rocks down on a ski resort, killing one.

July brought record-breaking heat that killed at least 80 people and sent over 20,000 to hospital for treatment, along with torrential rains in western Japan that set off floods and landslides, killing more than 200.

Just two days after Jebi hit in September, the northernmost main island of Hokkaido was rocked by an earthquake that set off landslides, knocked out power throughout the island and killed at least 44 people. (Click to Source)

 

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Photos: Typhoon Mangkhut ravages Philippines, Hong Kong, and southern China

Dozens were killed, many in a deadly landslide in the Philippines.

The aftermath of Typhoon Mangkhut in Alcala, Philippines on September 15, 2018.
Jes Aznar/Getty Images

Typhoon Mangkhut made its deadly march across the Philippines, Hong Kong, and southern China over the weekend, unleashing flooding, dangerous winds, and landslides, and killing dozens.

Mangkhut was the world’s most powerful storm this year so far, according to meteorologists, reaching sustained winds as high as 170 miles per hour — about the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane — and spanning as wide as 550 miles. (Hurricanes and typhoons are both tropical cyclones, but called different names based on the regions where they form; hurricanes exist in the Atlantic or northeastern Pacific, and typhoons originate in the northwest Pacific.)

The typhoon slammed into the region around the same time Hurricane Florence was battering the Carolinas. Florence was a Category 2 storm (winds between 96 and 110 miles per hour) when it made landfall — though the slow-moving storm and its relentless rains created different hazards.

Here are some scenes of Mangkhut’s devastation as it ripped through the region.

The Philippines got hit first — and the hardest

Super Typhoon Mangkhut Batters the Philippines as it Makes Landfall
Debris in Alcala, Philippines.
Jes Aznar/Getty Images

The typhoon slammed into the northern Philippines early Saturday morning, where the death toll stands at 66, though it’s expected to rise. Many were killed by landslides, including more than 34 miners who were buried when a mountain collapsed on a bunkhouse in the remote mining town of Itogon.

Typhoon Mangkhut causes deadly landslide in Philippines.
Rescuers assist people in Itogon, which was hit by a deadly landslide, on September 16, 2018.
Jayjay Landingin/AP

Dozens remain missing, including children who were working at the illegal mining site, Philippines authorities said. The mayor of the town, Victorio Palangdan, said it was likely that those who had not yet been recovered were dead. “I am 99% sure the people there are dead,” he said, according to the Guardian.

Typhoon Mangkhut landslide in Philippines.
The aftermath of landslides in Itogon on September 16, 2018.
Jayjay Landingin/AP

Tens of thousands are said to have been affected by the storm, and the government is still trying to assess the extent of the damage.

Mangkhut was the strongest storm to hit Hong Kong in decades

Hong Kong Sets Highest Storm Alert As Super Typhoon Mangkhut Arrives
The aftermath of Typhoon Mangkhut on September 17, 2018, in Hong Kong.
Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images

After devastating the Philippines, Mangkhut veered toward Hong Kong, making it one of the strongest storms to make landfall there in decades. The storm had weakened, with sustained winds of about 96 miles per hour, but the still-powerful gusts blasted out windows and downed trees, crippling the city and its transportation network.

Hong Kong Sets Highest Storm Alert As Super Typhoon Mangkhut Arrives
Hong Kong after Mangkhut on September 17, 2018.
Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images

Storm surge threatened the coastal areas, and reached as high as 11 feet — which broke a more than century-old record, according to the BBC. The seaside town of Heng Fa Chuen was particularly hard-hit, with rapid flooding and wind damage.

Tiffany May@NYtmay

Residents held hands and helped each other cross the flooded streets. “Heng Fa Chuen has become a reservoir,” a longtime resident said in dismay. #Mangkhut #HongKong#HengFaChuen

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Hundreds of people were injured, though authorities said no one had been killed.

China deals with a weakened Mangkhut

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People’s Daily,China

@PDChina

Super Typhoon #Mangkhut landed at 5 p.m. (Beijing time) Sun on the coast of Jiangmen, S China’s Guangdong, packing winds up to 162 km/h (101 mph); it also slammed China’s Hong Kong on Sun with strong winds and heavy rain, leaving 213 people injured.

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Mangkhut arrived in China late Sunday into early Monday morning, killing at least four people and forcing millions to evacuate from the province of Guangdong and other coastal areas.

Macau, the autonomous region also in its path, was forced to shut down its casinos, as the area was inundated with flood waters.

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SCMP News

@SCMPNews

Replying to @SCMPNews

Typhoon #Mangkhut: Major roads near #Macau‘s Inner Harbour are severely flooded http://buff.ly/2My3zdc #TyphoonMangkhut

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The storm was downgraded to a tropical depression on Monday afternoon as it moved west from Guangdong, on the southern coast of mainland China. (Click to Source)

 

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After Floods and Heatwave, Japan Braces for Typhoon Jongdari

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High temperatures in Tokyo on July 24. Photographer: Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images

Typhoon Jongdari is set to make landfall on Japan’s mainland this weekend, bringing heavy rain and strong winds to much of a country hit in recent weeks by a deadly heatwave and historic flooding.

The typhoon was located off Chichijima, an island in the Pacific about 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) southeast of Tokyo, as of 2 p.m. Japan time Friday. Carrying sustained winds of 144 kilometers (89 miles) per hour, it’s expected to speed up and maintain its intensity as it nears the mainland on Saturday afternoon, according to the Japan Meteorological Agency.

After skirting Tokyo on Saturday, the typhoon is predicted to track towards the west of the country, near regions that were the worst hit by the historic rain and flooding. More than two hundred were killed in the floods, with some roads still impassable and train lines suspended.

“It’s possible that the typhoon could have a very large impact” on the flood-hit areas, a spokesman for the Japan Meteorological Agency said, and while the agency has yet to issue any specific warnings for these areas, it could do so over the weekend.

For now, the agency is warning many regions of strong rainfall of up to 500 millimeters over 24 hours, and urging people to be on guard for the risk of landslides and flooding. Tokyo’s Sumidagawa fireworks festival, which attracts close to a million visitors, has been postponed to Sunday as a result of the approaching storm.

Jongdari would be the first tropical cyclone to make landfall in Japan this year. Recent years have seen an increase in the number of typhoons directly hitting Japan, with at least four in each of the past four years. (Click to Source)

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Typhoon Lan leaves flooding, four dead in Japan before moving out to sea

A collapsed road is seen following torrential rain caused by typhoon Lan in Kishiwada

A rapidly weakening typhoon Lan made landfall in Japan on Monday, setting off landslides and flooding that prompted evacuation orders for tens of thousands of people, but then headed out to sea after largely sparing the capital, Tokyo.

A collapsed road is seen following torrential rain caused by typhoon Lan in Kishiwada, Japan in this photo taken by Kyodo on October 23, 2017. Mandatory credit Kyodo/via REUTERS

Four people were reported killed, hundreds of plane flights canceled, and train services disrupted in the wake of Lan, which had maintained intense strength until virtually the time it made landfall west of Tokyo in the early hours of Monday.

At least four people were killed, including a man who was hit by falling scaffolding, a fisherman tending to his boat, and a young woman whose car had been washed away by floodwaters.

Another casualty was left comatose by injuries and a man was missing, NHK public television said. Around 130 others suffered minor injuries.

Rivers burst their banks in several parts of Japan and fishing boats were tossed up on land. A container ship was stranded after being swept onto a harbor wall but all 19 crew members escaped injury.

Some 80,000 people in Koriyama, a city 200 km (124 miles) north of Tokyo, were ordered to evacuate as a river neared the top of its banks, NHK said, but by afternoon water levels were starting to fall. Several hundred houses in western Japan were flooded.

A listing cargo ship which ran onto a breakwater earlier, amid strong wind caused by Typhoon Lan, is seen at a port in Toyama prefecture, Japan in this photo taken by Kyodo on October 23, 2017. Mandatory credit Kyodo/via REUTERS

“My grandchild lives over there. The house is fine, but the area is flooded, and they can’t get out,” one man told NHK.

Lan had weakened to a category 2 storm when it made landfall early on Monday, sideswiping Tokyo, after powering north for days as an intense category 4 storm, according to the Tropical Storm Risk monitoring site.

By Monday afternoon the storm had been downgraded to a tropical depression and it was in the Pacific, east of the northernmost main island of Hokkaido, the Japan Meteorological Agency said.

Around 350 flights were canceled and train services disrupted over a wide area of Japan, although most commuter trains were running smoothly in Tokyo.

Toyota Motor Corp canceled the first shift at all of its assembly plants but said it would operate the second shift as normal.

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