Tornadoes, thunderstorms and hail will batter 40 million Americans as severe storms sweep through the Plains, Midwest, and South

  • Severe storms will barrel through the U.S. this week affecting 40million people
  • The storm, that started in the Rocky Mountains, will affect parts of the Plains, Midwest and South this week  
  • It’ll bring pounding rain, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes and hail to in Texas, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana
  • On Monday alone there were 110 reports of severe weather, mostly in Kansas and Nebraska where several tornadoes were reported
  • The deluge set new daily record of 4.7 inches of rain in Chanute, Kansas Monday
  • The storm will wreak havoc bringing severe weather from Texas to Missouri from Tuesday through Thursday 
  • By Thursday the storms will slide southeast – hitting Louisiana to Tennessee

More than 40million Americans will be affected by severe weather that will barrel through the U.S. this week bringing pounding rain, thunderstorms, howling tornadoes and hail with it.

The storm will affect parts of the Plains, the Midwest and the South.

On Monday there were 110 reports of severe weather, mostly from Kansas and Nebraska, where monster tornadoes ripped through the states.

Torrential rain pounded down from the unmerciful skies in Kansas, causing flash flooding and setting a new daily record of 4.7 inches of rain in the town of Chanute on May 6. The rain was so bad several homes had to be evacuated.

Tuesday through Thursday will see damaging winds, hail, and tornadoes along with thunderstorms and heavy rain in Texas, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana.

On Monday there were 110 reports of severe weather, mostly from Kansas and Nebraska, where monster tornadoes ripped through the states. A tornado pictured above in Lewis, Kansas

On Monday there were 110 reports of severe weather, mostly from Kansas and Nebraska, where monster tornadoes ripped through the states. A tornado pictured above in Lewis, Kansas

 

The vicious tornadoes ripped through the fence of this family home in Nebraska above

The vicious tornadoes ripped through the fence of this family home in Nebraska above

 

Monday saw severe weather his Kansas and Nebraska with vicious winds that uprooted trees

Monday saw severe weather his Kansas and Nebraska with vicious winds that uprooted trees

 

This woman could barely get into her home when the whipping winds hit Nebraska

This woman could barely get into her home when the whipping winds hit Nebraska

 

A bolt of lightening - part of the series of storms that rolled through the Plains - hit and damaged the tarmac at Hutchinson Regional Airport

 

A bolt of lightening – part of the series of storms that rolled through the Plains – hit and damaged the tarmac at Hutchinson Regional Airport

 

Snow! Hail and snow fell in Aurora, Nebraska on Monday as well

Snow! Hail and snow fell in Aurora, Nebraska on Monday as well

The nucleus of the storm is in the Rocky Mountains – over Colorado and Wyoming – and it’s headed towards the Plains.

The storm will wreak havoc bringing severe weather from Texas to Missouri from Tuesday through Thursday.

On Tuesday, Oklahoma and Texas are the most vulnerable states, according to ABC.

By Wednesday morning the storm hit Oklahoma City and Dallas.

But the worst won’t be over just yet There will be more severe storms from east Texas through Missouri as well.

The nucleus of the storm is in the Rocky Mountains – over Colorado and Wyoming – and it's headed towards the Plains

The nucleus of the storm is in the Rocky Mountains – over Colorado and Wyoming – and it’s headed towards the Plains

 

This map shows the likelihood of severe thunderstorm on Thursday showing it'll affect Texas through Louisville, Kentucky

This map shows the likelihood of severe thunderstorm on Thursday showing it’ll affect Texas through Louisville, Kentucky

 

Wednesday will see the storm concentrated in Kansas, Arkansas, Missouri and Illinois

Wednesday will see the storm concentrated in Kansas, Arkansas, Missouri and Illinois

Temperatures may rise from east Texas to western Louisiana on Wednesday – which could increase the risk of tornado formation.

By Thursday the storms will slide southeast – hitting Louisiana to Tennessee with thunderstorms.

This week certain areas could see six to eight inches of rain. The intense downpour could lead to flash flooding and rapid river rising.

Widespread rainfall in this storm fall in the two to four inch range. The deluge will affect parts of the Mississippi river Valley from Oklahoma to Wisconsin, which could further worsen existing flood conditions.

Rain, rain, go away! The rain forecasts is expected to effect nearly the entire nation through Friday

Rain, rain, go away! The rain forecasts is expected to effect nearly the entire nation through Friday

 

The incoming deluge will also create flood alerts in the Plains, South and Midwest

The incoming deluge will also create flood alerts in the Plains, South and Midwest

(Click to Source)

 

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Areas paralyzed by blizzards and floods last month are getting ready for a SECOND ROUND of BOMB CYCLONE – 2nd UNUSUAL INLAND BOMBOGENESIS in less than a month

Only three weeks after a “bomb cyclone” — one of the most intense storms on record — pummeled the Plains and Midwest, another bombogenesis of similar strength has been forecast. This spring storm seems poised to dump even heavier snow; it could also be followed by another round of significant river flooding. Meteorologists say much of it is normal. But what is unusual is the second consecutive month for an inland bomb cyclone.

 

Areas that were paralyzed by blizzards and floods last month are getting ready for round two of a weather phenomenon known as a “bomb cyclone.”

Over the past few days, various forecast computer models have shown a blizzard of epic proportions for the north-central Plain States and Upper Midwest. Every time a model is updated, the storm depicted seems to get even more intense. At this point, it seems likely that some of the same areas impacted by devastating flooding just weeks ago are about to get slammed by an historic blizzard Wednesday through Friday.

As of Monday night, the storm system was located in the Pacific Northwest and is moving across the Rockies where it is expected to dump heavy snow into Tuesday to the mountains of Wyoming and Colorado.

The storm will intensify as it enters the central Great Plains on Wednesday. The barometric pressure — a measure of intensity in which lower means stronger — may drop to levels nearly as low as during the record-setting bomb cyclone in mid-March. In fact, this storm could tie or set April low pressure records.

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David Roth@DRmetwatch

The WPC forecast for Thursday morning implies that April low pressure records are possible in the central Plains & Midwest.

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As the storm strengthens, it will drag thick Gulf of Mexico moisture northward on a collision course with below freezing temperatures north of the system. It’s forecast to slow down at that point and perhaps even stall for 24 hours. That would mean a prolonged period of blinding heavy snow, wind gusts to 70 mph and near zero visibility in Nebraska, South Dakota, northern Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin from Wednesday through Friday.

The latest computer models put the bullseye for the heaviest snow band from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, through Minneapolis east to Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Snow totals could be staggering, with some models showing more than 30 inches in some areas.

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ZoomRadar@ZoomRadar

Models are amazingly similar in forecast snowfall – European, Canadian and FV3 (not pictured here) have bullseyes of 30-40 inches. While that seems unlikely because of heavy compacting of spring snow, numbers even close are “off the charts” for April or really any time of year !

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While not out of the question, snowfall of more than 30 inches is less plausible at any time, but especially this late in the season. That’s because in milder spring air, snow tends to be heavier, wetter and more compacted. Still, a narrow band of two feet seems well within reach.

For the sake of comparison, Minneapolis’ biggest snowfall was the Halloween Blizzard of 1991, when 28 inches piled up. The second biggest snowfall there was 21 inches in November 1985.

It wasn’t a coincidence that the two heaviest snows weren’t in the middle of winter. That’s because during mid-winter, the atmosphere is often too cold and dry in the Upper Midwest to support the most substantial snowfalls. In fact, 15 of the 20 biggest snow totals happened outside of the dead of winter. But in autumn and spring, the atmosphere is loaded with more moisture, lending more credibility to the possibility of the forecast spring blockbuster topping the charts.

Regardless of snowfall amounts, it seems certain that copious amounts of water will be squeezed out of the air – a liquid equivalent of two to four inches. Once the snow melts starting this weekend, the water would run off into already flooded rivers in the High Plains and Midwest.

Sunday night, dozens of gauges along the Mississippi, Big Sioux and James rivers were in major or moderate flood stage. Flooding has mostly receded along the Missouri River.

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Jeff Berardelli@WeatherProf

Across the nation 34 river gauges are in major flood stage, 55 in moderate and many of those are in the Midwest. With 2 feet of snow (water equivalent of 2 to 4 inches) possible mid to late week – and rapid spring melt starting late weekend – concerns for river more flooding.

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Since Jan. 1, that part of the country has seen about twice its normal precipitation. With saturated ground, melting snow is likely to converge into area rivers. With that setup in mind, NOAA issued a rare, strongly worded Spring outlook calling for potentially historic flooding. Ed Clark, director of NOAA’s National Water Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama explained, “This is shaping up to be a potentially unprecedented flood season, with more than 200 million people at risk for flooding in their communities.

So, when the blizzard ends, attention will need to shift to melting snow and runoff. There’s no telling how significant the flooding will become but given the warning signs, it’s certainly something that needs to be monitored closely.

Welcome to springtime in the Rockies and parts of the Great Plains. That will be the second consecutive month for an inland bomb cyclone. And that’s very unusual.The March 13 bomb cyclone caused massive flooding and produced winds of between 96 and 110 mph. What about the next one in the coming days? (Click to Source)

 

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