Firefighter loses both hands and feet from flu complications…

By: DANA ARSCHIN
POSTED: MAR 30 2018 05:46PM EDT

UPDATED: MAR 30 2018 10:47PM EDT

 

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 – Loved ones of Willy McCue, 19, have always thought of him as a hero. A fierce high school varsity athlete. A volunteer firefighter.

“He joined the fire department just to give back to everybody,” New City Fire Assistant Chief Richard Willows said. “That’s the type of heart he has.”

Willy’s strength and bravery are being tested to the limit. He has been in critical condition in the hospital for over a month. He caught a severe case of the flu, which led to pneumonia and sepsis.

“Both hands were amputated and both feet,” Willows said. “And they are working on his leg right now which is hopeful.”

Willy’s uniform and helmet await his return at the New City Fire Department in Rockland County. The teen volunteered here as a probationary firefighter and was a 2016 graduate of Clarkstown High School North. His former football coach set up a GoFundMe page to help.

“It’s tough. I went to go see him last week and his spirits are high right now,” volunteer firefighter Thomas Gerlich said. “I’m hoping that they stay high and let him know that we are behind him with him through this whole process.”

Willows added, “As sad as he is, he’s in good spirits and just wants to get to rehab and get back riding the trucks—that’s what our goal is.”

While Willy undergoes more surgeries, his loved ones are busy raising money to help him adjust to life when he comes home.

As of Friday afternoon, the GoFundMe campaign had nearly $74,000 in donations. The community and fire department are also coming together to organize several fundraisers starting in April. (Click to Source)

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Another Child In Indiana Dies Of Flu, 100 Deaths in KY, 136 in Indiana

7-year-old Ind. girl dies after flu diagnosis

Do Not Get the Flu Shot. It Does Not Work and Can Kill You!

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Indiana (WHAS11) – Bartholomew County first grader Savanna Jessie died suddenly this week after testing positive for the flu.

When Courtney Hargett held her niece for the last time, she had no idea goodbye would come so suddenly.

“We got news that she had been sick, and (her father) had taken her to the hospital,” she said.

Savanna lived with her father in Columbus.

Hargett said, “After they left the hospital, he took her home, put her in bed, and then found her in the morning.”

Savanna was unresponsive. Medics rushed her to Columbus Regional Hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

Savanna had been treated after testing positive for flu, strep and scarlet fever.

“Savana came into this world seven weeks early. She was a fighter. She was strong,” Hargett said.

Tracy Kaiser has a daughter at Lincoln Elementary, the same school Savanna attended.

“My daughter knew her as a happy child and somebody that the kids look forward to spending time together with,” she said.

Bartholomew County superintendent Dr. Jim Roberts said, “Please keep the child’s family and the CSA Lincoln community in your thoughts.”

Savanna’s family had this to say to other parents: “Be careful. Monitor your children very closely, and make sure they’re vaccinated.” (Click to Source)

© 2018 WHAS-TV

Flu widespread in 36 states, CDC reports

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Outbreaks of influenza are getting an early start this year in part because of cold weather gripping much of the USA and low efficacy associated with this year’s flu vaccine.

It’s still too early to say whether this winter will be a bad season for the flu, but epidemiologists in 36 states already have reported widespread influenza activity to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in data released Friday. Twenty-one of those states show a high number of cases.

“It’s just one of those years where the CDC is seeing that this strain of flu is only somewhat covered by the vaccine that was given this year,” said Jennifer Radtke, manager for infection prevention at the University of Tennessee Medical Center in Knoxville. “They’re seeing that it’s anywhere from 10% to 33% effective, so any time there’s a mismatch between the vaccine and the circulating strain of the flu, you’re going to see more cases.”

Vaccine effectiveness varies from year to year though recent studies show that a flu shot typically reduces the risk of illness by 40% to 60% among the overall population when the circulating virus is matched closely to the vaccine virus, according to the CDC.

Because only a certain percentage of people with flu symptoms go to hospitals and get tested, it can be challenging to track the actual number of people affected, Radtke said. False negative results for flu tests are also common, so it’s likely the number of people with the flu is much higher.

From the start of the flu season, which begins in October and lasts until May, Arizona has reported a nearly ninefold increase in the number of cases compared with the same period last year, according to the state Department of Health Services.

“It’s not uncommon to see (flu) this time of year,” said Radtke in Knoxville. “But we’ve had cold Decembers.

Flu symptoms include fever, body aches, chills, fatigue, cough and a sore throat. The illness typically passes within a few days but can be especially dangerous to the very young, the very old, pregnant women and those with respiratory problems.

Influenza can develop into pneumonia, an infection that causes the lungs’ air sacs to become inflamed and fill with fluid.

Deaths already have occurred in some states this flu season. Among them:

• In Arizona, the state is reporting one death of a child in its latest tally; however, an otherwise healthy 20-year-old mother of two in Phoenix died Nov. 28, one day after being diagnosed, CBS News reported.

• In California, at least 10 people younger than 65 have died, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. An 11th death occurred Thursday. The state does not track flu-related deaths among those 65 and older.

• In Delaware, a 47-year-old man with underlying health problems and an 83-year-old woman have died, state health officials said.

• In North Carolina, 12 people, including a child, have died.

• In South Carolina, seven have died. All were age 65 or older.

Getting a flu shot now is still one way to combat the virus even though it can’t promise total immunity, health officials say.

More insurers fully cover the cost, and pharmacists in all states now can administer the vaccinations, according to the American Pharmacists Association trade group.

“People are able to come in to the pharmacy — especially a 24-hour pharmacy like this one where you can come in at literally any time — and be in and out usually within 15 minutes,” said Jason Lind, a Walgreens pharmacist in St. Cloud, Minn.

Also to keep the germs at bay, wash or sanitize your hands frequently, especially if you’re touching shared surfaces such as shopping carts in public places; clean faucet and toilet handles frequently at home to reduce transmission of the virus within your family; cover your mouth when coughing; stay home when you’re sick; stay away from sick people; and avoid touching your face.

It also pays to stay well rested and hydrated so if you do come in contact with a flu virus, your body is prepared to fight it off.

If you’re already feeling ill, get to a doctor as quickly as possible.

Antiviral prescription drugs such as Tamiflu can lessen the severity of influenza for people who have had flu symptoms for two days or fewer and prevent complications such as pneumonia. But they also can have side effects, so a flu shot while you’re well should be your first choice.

“It can take up to two weeks to build full immunity to the flu after you are vaccinated,” said Dr. Cara Christ, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services. “So I encourage everyone who has not yet had a flu shot to get one today before the holidays.” (Click to Source)

3 Polio Facts That The CDC Wishes You Didn’T Know

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Many people I talk to agree that the current CDC vaccination schedule is appalling. These same people commonly acknowledge that vaccines for HPV or the flu are ineffective and cause much more harm than good.

However, many of these seemingly intelligent people fall into the “But, Polio” crowd.

Despite evidence that polio was on the decline long before the introduction of the vaccine, and that sanitation and plumbing improvements are likely the reason for the decline of the disease as opposed to a carcinogenic syringe filled with neurotoxins and environmental pesticides, far too many people still hail the polio vaccine as one of the greatest accomplishments of 20th century medicine.

If you are one of those people who has ever stated“but, what about polio?”, this is for you.

1. The first polio vaccine was developed by Dr. Jonas Salk. Human experiments using this vaccine were conducted purposely on orphans in government/church run institutions because they were vulnerable and didn’t require parental consent signatures, as they had no parents.

The vaccine was “declared safe” (as they always are), but tragically, that vaccine gave 40,000 orphans polio and permanently paralyzed hundreds of others. At least 10 children died as a result of vaccine-induced polio. All injuries and deaths were under-reported of course by the same authorities who orchestrated the atrocity. (This is known as The Cutter Incident.)

“In retrospect, a good deal of the blame for the vaccine snafu also went to the National Foundation (for Infantile Paralysis), which, with years of publicity, had built up the danger of polio out of all proportion to its actual incidence, and had rushed into vaccinations this year with patently insufficient preparation.” ~Time Magazine: Monday, May 30, 1955 (Click to Article)

WANT TO GET THE FLU? VOLUNTEERS SNEEZE FOR SCIENCE

The U.S.Goverment still pushes Vaccines that are Not Safe.   Come on, they are trying to Kill You!

BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — Forget being sneezed on: Government scientists are deliberately giving dozens of volunteers the flu by squirting the live virus straight up their noses.

It may sound bizarre, but the rare type of research is a step in the quest for better flu vaccines. It turns out that how the body fends off influenza remains something of a mystery.

“Vaccines are working, but we could do better,” said Dr. Matthew Memoli of the National Institutes of Health, who is leading the study that aims to infect up to 100 adults over the next year.

Wait a minute: Flu is sweeping the country, so why not just study the already sick? That wouldn’t let scientists measure how the immune system reacts through each step of infection, starting with that first exposure to the virus.

It’s not an experiment to be taken lightly. After all, the flu kills thousands of Americans a year. For safety, Memoli chose a dose that produces mild to moderate symptoms – and accepts only volunteers who are healthy and no older than 50.

And to avoid spreading the germs, participants must spend at least nine days quarantined inside a special isolation ward at the NIH hospital, their health closely monitored. They’re not released until nasal tests prove they’re no longer contagious.

The incentive: About $3,000 to compensate for their time.

“I received a very scolding email from my mother” about signing up, Daniel Bennett, 26, said with a grin.

“Their standards are so high, I don’t believe I’m in danger,” added Bennett, a restaurant worker from College Park, Md. “I don’t get sick that often.”

A masked and gloved Memoli had Bennett lie flat for about a minute.

“It will taste salty. Some will drip down the back of your throat,” Memoli said, before squeezing a syringe filled with millions of microscopic virus particles, floating in salt water, into each nostril.

Sure enough, a few days later Bennett had the runny nose and achiness of mild flu.

The best defense against influenza is a yearly vaccine, but it’s far from perfect. In fact, the vaccine is least effective in people age 65 and older – the group most susceptible to flu – probably because the immune system weakens with age.

Understanding how younger adults’ bodies fight flu may help scientists determine what the more vulnerable elderly are missing, clues to help develop more protective vaccines for everyone, Memoli explained.

Here’s the issue: The vaccine is designed to raise people’s levels of a particular flu-fighting antibody. It targets a protein that acts like the virus’ coat, called hemagglutinin – the “H” in H1N1, the strain that caused the 2009 pandemic and that is causing the most illness so far this winter, too.

But it’s not clear what antibody level is best to aim for – or whether a certain amount means you’re protected against getting sick at all, or that you’d get a mild case instead of a severe one.

“As mind-boggling as it is, we don’t know the answer to that,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, chief of NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “We made some assumptions that we knew everything about flu.”

Just targeting hemagglutinin probably isn’t enough, Memoli added. Already, some people in his study didn’t get sick, despite remarkably low antibody levels, meaning something else must be protecting them.

Could it be antibodies against the “N” in flu’s name, the neuraminidase protein? Specific T cells that are activated to fight infection? Genes that switch on and off when a virus invades?

To begin finding out, Memoli first developed a laboratory-grown copy of the H1N1 flu strain and sprayed different amounts into volunteers’ noses until he found the right dose to trigger mild flu. He hopes eventually to test the harsher H3N2 strain, too.

Now he’s infecting two groups – people with low antibody levels and those with high levels. Some were recently vaccinated, and some weren’t. He’ll compare how sick they get, how long they’re contagious and how the immune system jumps into action.

Called a human challenge study, this kind of research hasn’t been performed with flu viruses in the U.S. for more than a decade, before scientists had ways as sophisticated to measure what happens.

“It’s all going to add up to a better understanding of what you need to have to be protected against the flu,” said Dr. John Treanor, a flu specialist at the University of Rochester Medical Center who is closely watching the work.

So far, Memoli’s patients are becoming contagious a day or two before they start feeling bad, one reason the flu spreads so easily. He sees a range of symptoms, from sniffles to a few days of moderate fever, fatigue and congestion.

Bennett’s flu was pretty mild, and he passed the time studying, watching TV and playing games with the four other study participants infected this month.

“All I had to do was read and watch movies, so it wasn’t that terrible,” Bennett said. “It was a really cool experience” to see how research is done.

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