They knew: Recently unsealed court documents reveal that makers of OxyContin purposely misled doctors and consumers about the strength of the drug

(Natural News) The opioid epidemic has been costly, there’s little doubt about that. With 47,600 deaths from opioid overdose in 2017 alone, the wave of death shows no signs of slowing down. And all the while, Big Pharma has been cashing out. Purdue Pharma, owned by the Sackler family and producer of the most infamous opioid, OxyContin, was raking in $1 billion in annual sales at one point — and now, unsealed court documents show that the pharma giant purposely deceived doctors and used aggressive marketing tactics to bolster their profits. While all pharma companies stand accused of putting profits before people, the latest revelations in the case against OxyContin (and similar drugs) certainly takes the cake.

Thanks to Purdue Pharma’s misdeeds and unlawful behavior, thousands of lives have been lost or destroyed. And yet for some reason, the Sackler family has escaped culpability. David Sackler himself denies any responsibility for the opioid epidemic — even though recently disclosed court documents show that the good doctor advised Purdue’s marketing team to hide the truth about OxyContin and the danger it posed.

Purdue founders knew OxyContin was dangerous

As Natural Health 365 reports, sealed court documents from 2015 have recently been made public. The evidence clearly shows that OxyContin creators knew that the drug had an enormous potential for addiction and misuse — and instead of doing the right thing, the company lied about the risks involved with their product.

Not only did the makers of OxyContin market the drug as being “less strong” than morphine (even though it’s actually stronger), sales representatives were encouraged to say that OxyContin “couldn’t be abused” and was not addictive.

We have seen how well that played out: Up to 130 deaths per day from opioid abuse.

As Vox reports, Purdue Pharma got approval from the FDA to market OxyContin as “less prone to abuse” because of its extended-release formula. Purdue Pharma claims that by releasing a lot of the drug over time, they could prevent misuse. However, this extended-release formula also allowed Purdue to put a lot more of the drug into each pill. Users can then bypass the “extended release” by crushing up their pills before use. Ultimately, this made the drug more prone to being abused.

Hundreds of thousands of people have died as a direct result of opioid abuse — and countless others have gone on to become addicted to heroin or other opiates thanks to opioids. Statistics from the National Institute on Drug Abuse show that 75 percent of heroin addicts started off with an opioid.

Purdue Pharma founders deny reality

Even after Purdue Pharma and three top executives plead guilty in 2016, and even after dozens of doctors have lost their licenses for getting kick-backs and over-prescribing opioids, the Sackler family continues to deny the truth about OxyContin. In a recent interview with Vanity Fair, David Sackler even went so far as to claim that the addiction rate is only “between two and three percent,” and might rise to five percent with “more typical dependence and misuse.”

Never mind the fact that real science shows that the addiction rate with opioids is more like 26 percent — is it really supposed to be acceptable for a prescription drug to cause any level of dependence or misuse? Sackler isn’t just denying culpability — he’s normalizing drug addiction and talking about drug dependency as if its a simple fact of life.

Estimates suggest 22.4 million opioid prescriptions are doled out annually in the U.S. That’s 66.5 opioid prescriptions per every 100 people. Even if just two percent of those people were to end up addicted, it is two percent still too many. The opioid crisis has hit America hard, and it is high time the Sacklers owned up to what their misleading marketing tactics, shifty bribing practices and other bad behaviors have done to the country and its people. (Click to Source)

Learn more about toxic pharmaceuticals at DangerousMedicine.com.

Sources for this article include:

NaturalHealth365.com

Vox.com

 

decolores2bpostrer

 

Addiction Ends at the Foot of the Cross by True Salvation thru Yeshua the Messiah – Jesus Christ

Costa Mesa files lawsuit against distributors and manufacturers of opioid pain medication

Costa Mesa is taking distributors and manufacturers of opioid pain medication to court in a bid to recoup tax dollars it alleges were spent as a result of the addiction epidemic that has afflicted communities coast to coast.

 

In a lawsuit filed March 29, the city argues that the businesses “intentionally flooded the market with opioids and pocketed billions of dollars in the process” while making “false statements designed to persuade both doctors and patients that prescription opioids posed a low risk of addiction.”

 

Such actions, the city alleges, “have not only caused significant costs but have also created a palpable climate of fear, distress, dysfunction and chaos among Costa Mesa residents where opioid diversion, abuse and addiction are prevalent and where diverted opioids tend to be used frequently.”

 

Opioids include powerful legal prescription painkillers such as hydrocodone, morphine and oxycodone.

 

The lawsuit names about a dozen distributors and manufacturers as defendants, including Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, and certain members of the Sackler family that controls the company.

 

“This epidemic has personally touched the lives of many members of our community,” Mayor Katrina Foley said in a statement Thursday. “It’s time that we take action and put a halt to the lives being destroyed and the economic drain opioid addiction is placing on our community.”

 

Purdue Pharma spokesman Bob Josephson wrote in an emailed statement Thursday afternoon that the company “and the individual former directors of the company vigorously deny the allegations in the complaint and will continue to defend themselves against these misleading allegations.”

 

“The complaint is part of a continuing effort to try these cases in the court of public opinion rather than the justice system,” Josephson wrote. He added that he believes the complaint disregards or fails to note facts about Purdue’s prescription medications and pertinent federal regulations.

 

“Such serious allegations demand clear evidence linking the conduct alleged to the harm described, but we believe the city fails to show such causation and offers little evidence to support its sweeping legal claims,” he said.

 

In the suit, Costa Mesa alleges it has seen increased costs in myriad areas as a result of the opioid epidemic, including “medical and therapeutic care,” “counseling, treatment and rehabilitation services,” public safety and code enforcement.

 

A particularly pressing issue from the city’s perspective is the proliferation of local sober-living homes, which house recovering addicts, including those battling opioid dependence. Costa Mesa “has the largest concentration of sober-living homes in Orange County, creating a plethora of nuisance issues for residents, multiple calls for service by police and fire and millions of dollars in legal fees,” according to a city news release.

 

Also mentioned in the lawsuit is Costa Mesa fire Capt. Mike Kreza, who died in November after he was hit by a vehicle while riding his bicycle. The driver, Stephen Taylor Scarpa, 25, of Mission Viejo, was suspected of driving under the influence of drugs and has pleaded not guilty to one count of murder. Authorities allege he was in possession of pills prescribed by aTustin doctor who faces federal charges of illegally distributing opioids and other narcotics by writing prescriptions to people without medical examinations.

 

“Costa Mesa has been directly injured by the loss of Capt. Kreza, including costs for training and hiring a replacement, as well as pension and death benefits,” the lawsuit states. “These increased costs could have been — and should have been — prevented by the opioid industry.”

 

Lawsuits such as Costa Mesa’s have become increasingly common. Last month, Purdue and the Sackler family agreed to pay $270 million to the state of Oklahoma to settle claims that aggressive marketing of OxyContin helped create the addiction crisis, according to the

Associated Press. Nationwide, the company faces nearly 2,000 lawsuits, AP reported.

But Josephson said, “We believe that no pharmaceutical manufacturer has done more to address the opioid addiction crisis than Purdue, and we continue to work closely with governments and law enforcement agencies on this difficult social issue.” (Click to Source)

 

Get online and get completely recovered! We are a Biblical Online Recovery Program that is life changing and empowering. We are Teen Challenge Certified Teachers and have integrated the world famous Teen Challenge PSNC curriculum for the most healing fusion of elements for your recovery. VRM is breaking the chains of addiction for a lifetime! Check us out!

 

Johnson & Johnson exposed as the mastermind corporation behind the opioid epidemic that kills 60,000 Americans a year

Wednesday, March 20, 2019 by: Isabelle Z.

(Natural News) Who is to blame for the opioid epidemic that is currently gripping the nation and taking the lives of 60,000 Americans each year? Most people tend to blame the makers of these drugs, the doctors who prescribe them, and some even fault those who take these medications. However, now a very familiar name has been exposed as being the mastermind behind the opioid epidemic: Johnson & Johnson.

While you might associate Johnson & Johnson with pure images like the squeaky-clean, soft skin of a baby thanks to years of effective marketing, it appears that something far dirtier is going on at the New Jersey-based multinational personal care brand. The accusation that it was the “kingpin” fueling the opioid crisis in the U.S. and acting as a major seller, provider and lobbyist carries a lot of weight as it comes from Oklahoma’s Attorney General, Mike Hunter.

In May, his state will see the first major opioid epidemic trial take place, and it is expected to set the stage for litigation of a similar nature across the country, not to mention a nationwide lawsuit. Hunter requested that a state court release millions of pages of confidential documents to the public that were submitted by Johnson & Johnson during the case’s discovery phase, writing that the public interest contained therein is “urgent, enduring and overwhelming.”

J&J targeted vulnerable groups while downplaying dangers

The state of Oklahoma is alleging that Johnson & Johnson targeted vulnerable populations, such as the elderly and children, for painkiller prescriptions. The company also funded groups that advocated to facilitate access to the drugs, such as the Pain Care Forum. In addition, they downplayed the drug’s dangers; for example, a brochure made by a subsidiary of J&J geared toward senior citizens outrageously states that “opioids are rarely addictive.”

The defendants in the case include Johnson & Johnson as well as Teva Pharmaceuticals, Purdue Pharma, and Allergan. Hunter says the firms deceived the public into thinking the drugs were safe to use over long periods. District Court Judge Thad Balkman recently denied a request made by the pharmaceutical companies involved to delay the trial, saying that it’s in the public’s interest for this trial to begin as scheduled.

Johnson & Johnson is being accused of using a web of domestic and foreign subsidiaries to provide the raw materials needed to manufacture opioids. While companies like Purdue Pharma, who produce OxyContin, certainly need to be held accountable for their extreme irresponsibility, J&J’s culpability is also clear. They played a big role in producing the raw narcotics from poppy fields that are turned into active ingredients in top-selling opioids, boasting that their poppy’s morphine content was some of the “highest in the world,” according to an Axios report.

The two subsidiaries that handled the opium poppy business, Tasmanian Alkaloids and Noramco, were sold by J&J for $650 million in 2016 to a private equity firm. A year earlier, they sold an opioid pill that they had previously marketed known as Nucynta, while they continued to sell the fentanyl patch Duragesic. According to a state court document, the company was a “kingpin behind the public-health emergency, profiting at every stage.” (Related: Johnson & Johnson to pay $2.2 billion for making false marketing claims and engaging in kickbacks.)

Johnson & Johnson is also facing legal action for covering up the connection between asbestos-containing baby powder and cancer.

More than 1,600 American cities and 36 states are currently suing the makers and distributors of opioids in hopes of collecting funds needed to deal with the opioid public health crisis.

Everyone who has played a role in this devastating crisis deserves to be exposed and brought to justice, from those who put opioids in people’s hands to those who help pharmaceutical companies obtain the ingredients they need to make these deadly drugs. (Click to Source)

Sources for this article include:

WakingTimes.com

Axios.com

FAMILY OF OPIOID-ADDICTED BABY SUES PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES

big-pharma-e1485520284119

Mar. 5, 2018 2:32 PM ET

 (AP) — An Illinois family of a baby born addicted to opioids is suing 20 pharmaceutical companies alleging they’re responsible for the mother’s addition to opioids and heroin.

The lawsuit states that a baby, identified by his initials T.W.B., was born in March 2017 and diagnosed with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, which can cause breathing and feeding problems. The lawsuit says baby T.W.B. spent his first days in “excruciating pain” as he weaned from an opioid addiction inherited from his mother, the Belleville News-Democrat reported .

The baby’s grandparents, Deric and Ceonda Rees, filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court of Southern Illinois Wednesday. Ceonda Rees declined the newspaper’s request for comment.

“Baby T.W.B. will require years of treatment and counseling to deal with the effects of prenatal exposure,” the lawsuit states. “Baby T.W.B. and his mother are victims of the opioid crisis that has ravaged Illinois, causing immense suffering to those born addicted to opioids and great expense to those forced to deal with the aftermath.”

Babies can also suffer birth defects if a mother takes opioids while pregnant, according to Stanford Children’s Health. The National Institute on Drug Abuse has reported that the number of babies born with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome has increased fivefold since 2000.

According to the lawsuit, the baby’s mother became addicted to opioids after she was prescribed them for a broken ankle and hand as a teenager. Her prescription opiates addiction later became a gateway to a heroin addiction. The lawsuit alleges that the mother has consumed drugs produced and distributed by the 20 companies, such as Dilaudid, Percocet, Oxycodone and Hydrocodone.

The lawsuit also alleges that the pharmaceutical companies are responsible for “false, negligent and unfair marketing/unlawful diversion of prescription opioids.”

The family has requested equitable relief and medical monitoring to help identify developmental issues and to pay for treatment.

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Purdue Pharma, Allergan and Teva Pharmaceuticals released statements in response to the lawsuit. Three companies didn’t respond for comment and two declined. (Click to Source)

CLICK HERE or the finest faith based personalized and compassionate addiction recovery program – right from the comfort of your home.

CLICK HERE for my ongoing special to all of my readers, for a super affordable telemedicine plan for you or for your entire family. The pricing is under $20 per month, so please get more info on this spectacular and unbeatable plan for 24/7 unlimited doctor visits by phone and online. There’s always a doctor when you need one – anytime day or night.

___

Information from: Belleville News-Democrat, http://www.bnd.com

© 2018  The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Maker of highly addictive OxyContin says it will stop incentivizing doctors to push its deadly drugs

prescription-drug-addiction-eating-opioids-e1518776407521

(Natural News) The opioid crisis has reached epidemic proportions in this country, with the number of deaths quadrupling since 2000, and around 115 people dying from overdoses each day. President Trump has declared the opioid crisis a national health emergency, and high schools across the country have started stocking up on the drug Narcan to try to save lives in case of an accidental overdose on school premises.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that when you consider direct healthcare costs, lost productivity, criminal prosecution and addiction treatment, this crisis costs the United States around $78.5 billion annually.

Now, Big Pharma giant Purdue, the  manufacturer of OxyContin, the world’s bestselling opioid drug, has vowed to stop marketing the drug to healthcare professionals.

Several pharmaceutical manufacturers, including Purdue, have admitted to having entire teams of sales people, as well as “front groups” and “key opinion leaders,” pushing the drug as a mainstream option for chronic, long-term pain, even though the drug was designed for cancer patients and others suffering severe pain who only need pain relief for a limited period of time.

As reported by Circa, when the drug was first released in 1995, it was hailed as a breakthrough in the treatment of severe pain, but users quickly learned that they could abuse the drug to get a high:

It worked over 12 hours to maintain a steady level of oxycodone in patients suffering from a wide range of pain ailments. But some users quickly discovered they could get a heroin-like high by crushing the pills and snorting or injecting the entire dose at once. In 2010 Purdue reformulated OxyContin to make it harder to crush and stopped selling the original form of the drug.

The manufacturer did not discontinue making the drug, of course, and went on to pitch it to healthcare professionals as a low-risk wonder drug for the treatment of pain. Purdue also later admitted to minimizing the addiction risk to doctors, who went on to prescribe it for many off-label uses, directly resulting in the crisis the country is now faced with. (Related: Learn more about what caused this crisis and what is being done to cope with it at Opioids.news.)

In the meantime, Purdue has been raking in billions in profits each year.

It is unlikely that the company has altruistic reasons for agreeing to stop lying to doctors about the risks and benefits of OxyContin. It is far more likely that the multiple lawsuits it has been inundated with has led to this change of heart.

While it is certainly better that Purdue is now no longer going to pitch propaganda to the healthcare community and has halved its sales staff to that end, experts believe that other pharmaceutical companies will have to follow suit before any real progress can be made in turning the tide of the opioid crisis.

“It is difficult to promote more cautious prescribing to the medical community because opioid manufacturers promote opioid use,” said Dr. Andrew Kolodny, director of opioid policy research at Brandeis University, and expert adviser in several of the lawsuits pending against Big Pharma.

While Purdue is a major producer of opioids, other big players like Johnson & Johnson and Allergan would have to make the same commitment to stopping the propaganda machine for any real progress to be made. (Related: Didn’t they take an oath not to do harm? Opioids are coming from doctors’ offices, not the ER.)

And while Purdue has promised to make changes in the U.S., it is making no such commitment regarding the international market.

“They are still doing this abroad,” Kolodny noted. “They are following the same playbook that they used in the United States.”

Circa noted that while Purdue Pharma only operates under that name in the United States, it is associated with two other pharmaceutical companies, Mundipharma and Napp, overseas. Purdue has distanced itself from these producers, saying that they operate independently and according to local regulations.

So, no real change of heart, then. They’ve simply turned their attention to the next lucrative market. (Click to Source)

CLICK HERE or the finest faith based personalized and compassionate addiction recovery program – right from the comfort of your home.

New healthcare bill uses $45 billion in taxpayer money to fight the opioid epidemic caused by wealthy pharmaceutical corporations

opioids-e1475078855338

(Natural News) In the midst of the ongoing and seemingly never ending healthcare debate, Senator Mike Lee of Utah and Senator Ted Cruz of Texas have proposed an amendment that, in addition to providing states with an extra $70 billion to help stabilize their markets, sets aside an additional $45 billion to fight the opioid epidemic.

Of course, the debate over the growing opioid epidemic and the possible solutions that may or may not help stabilize the number of Americans abusing these drugs has been in the national spotlight for quite some time now, as it should be. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, an estimated 1.9 million Americans suffered from opioid abuse in 2013 alone, a number that has continued to rise in each subsequent year.

As Addictions.com explains, “Opioids act as central nervous system depressants, slowing down nerve signal transmissions and blocking pain sensations from reaching the brain.” The website goes on to say that “while opioids pose little potential for harm when taken as prescribed, the abuse of these drugs sets off a series of damaging effects inside the brain’s chemical workings.” In the end, once addiction takes hold, the opioid user essentially becomes a slave to the euphoric effects of the drug.

In the year 2010, roughly 254 million opioid prescriptions were filled, with pharmaceutical companies generating an astonishing $11 billion in revenue from the sale of opioids during that same year, according to Fortune magazine. Of course, it would be silly to place all of the blame on the pharmaceutical companies for making money, but still, there is a case to be made that this entire opioid epidemic would either be significantly less devastating or even nonexistent had it not been for companies like Purdue Pharma, Abbott Labs, Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, Novartis, Watson Pharmaceuticals, and several others. (Click to Site)

Big Pharma Exposed for Knowingly Causing Opioid Epidemic, Ushering in a Heroin Nightmare

oxycontin-addiction-big-pharm

By Claire Bernish

Big Pharma created the legal opiate addiction epidemic and its outgrowth, rampant heroin abuse, because pharmaceutical corporations’ own addiction to profit arguably trumps any concern it may have had for patients. Though the accusation may seem harsh, the evidence has never been more apparent thanks to an investigation by the Los Angeles Times — which presents a scathing condemnation of the company behind the notorious painkiller, OxyContin.

Two decades ago, Purdue Pharma began marketing OxyContin — a chemical cousin to heroin — with the claim its 12-hour “smooth and sustained” dosing would revolutionize the treatment of pain. However, the claim is not only problematic in that its duration is often hours less than promised — leading patients to experience symptoms of withdrawal — but Purdue knew that before the painkiller ever hit the market.

As the Times discovered, Purdue’s push to market OxyContin, one of the most abused pharmaceuticals in history, flatly and continually ignored all reports from sales reps, complaints from doctors, and independent research on the drug — all in the name of profit.

Indeed, profit Purdue has — the company has reaped some $31 billion in revenue over OxyContin’s troubled 20-year stranglehold on the painkiller market. And ignoring complaints and research contradictory to its extended-relief claim is key to Purdue’s continued success with the hundreds-of-dollars-per-bottle drug, since milder opiate painkillers may, indeed, offer similar if not more effective benefits.

Because Purdue pressures doctors and sales reps to maintain the 12-hour dosing strictures, doctors often increase the prescribed potency.

More than half of long-term OxyContin users are on doses that public health officials consider dangerously high, according to an analysis of nationwide prescription data conducted for theTimes.

In examining the Times’ report, it becomes apparent Purdue has placed striving for profit above any iota of concern for suffering patients, the cycle of abuse and addiction, or the burgeoning health crisis due to opioid medication. But it isn’t OxyContin, in itself, driving the crisis — it’s the company’s insistence on the strictures of 12-hour dosing cycles, since the drug’s effects wear off much sooner for many. (Click to Article)

Meet America’s Richest Drug Dealer

sackler

Forbes released its list of America’s richest families again and this time, there’s a few new faces: The Sackler Family. Don’t know them? Well, you likely know someone who is potentially addicted to their products. The Sackler family is the world’s richest drug dealer (and it is all legal). The family owns  Stamford, Conn.-based Purdue Pharma. Purdue is the maker of OxyContin. Because of OxyContin, the Sackler family is now richer than the Busches, Mellons and Rockefellers. The Sacklers own every crevice of Purdue Pharmaceuticals; there are no partners. They share the spoils of their drug slinging with no one but themselves.

The Sackler family makes $3 billion a year, mostly from OxyContin. Forbes places the Sackler family’s net worth at a conservative $14 billion, that includes investments and accumulated dividends over the years.

OxyContin, in its current form, was launched in 1995, and it took no time in becoming a staple on Doctor’s prescribing pads. Sales were at $1.5 billion by 2002, and the Sackler family hasn’t looked back since. But it was the scammy way the Sackler family launched the drug which has thrust it into today’s opioid addiction issue as the staple issue. OxyContin was launched as a drug that isn’t addictive. (Click to Article)