Flooding threatens more than a million private wells in U.S. Midwest

Michael Burke
The Hill
Tue, 26 Mar 2019 11:42 UTC

Flooding in the Midwest is posing a risk of contamination to more than 1 million private wells that supply drinking water to rural areas in the region, The Associated Press reported Tuesday.

The AP reported that the National Ground Water Association, a trade group, said there are 1.1 million private wells in 300 flooded counties across 10 states in the Midwest.

Those states are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wisconsin, according to the AP.

Flooding creates the possibility that water from the flood will get into the wells and contaminate the water.

map wells

Flooding creates the possibility that water from the flood will get into the wells and contaminate the water.

Liesa Lehmann, the private-water section chief for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, told the AP that any wells within a flood area “are certainly going to be vulnerable to contamination.”

“Anyone who has a private well within a flood plain area of a major river, those wells are certainly going to be vulnerable to contamination,” Lehmann said.

Lehmann added that well owners should assume that their drinking water is contaminated if they see floodwater near or over their wells.

Chuck Job, the National Ground Water Association’s regulatory affairs manager, told the AP that when the flooding is over, the well water should be pumped out and the well should be disinfected. The water should then be tested to ensure that it’s safe to drink, Job added. (Click to Source)

 
Recovery Room 7 is a community of people with similar backgrounds, where people from all walks of drug & alcohol recovery can meet together, share, socialize, interact, join in fun activities, share meals, pray and learn. It’s a place of joy and awakening to their true purpose in life. Jesus Christ is always present and ready to receive everyone in Recovery Room 7. We will be located in beautiful Northwest Montana. If you would like to donate to get Recovery Room 7 up and running, please go to our PayPal Donation Link here.

 
Get online and get completely recovered! We are a Biblical Online Recovery Program that is life changing and empowering. We are Teen Challenge Certified Teachers and have integrated the world famous Teen Challenge PSNC curriculum for the most healing fusion of elements for your recovery. VRM is breaking the chains of addiction for a lifetime! Check us out!

“As Many As A Million Calves Lost In Nebraska” – Beef Prices In The U.S. To Escalate Dramatically In The Coming Months

According to Agriculture Secretary Sunny Purdue, there “may be as many as a million calves lost in Nebraska” due to the catastrophic flooding that has hit the state.  This is not a rumor, this is not an exaggeration, and this is not based on any sort of speculation.  This number comes to us directly from the top agriculture official in the entire country, and it means that the economic toll from the recent floods is far greater than most of us had anticipated.  You can watch Purdue make this quote on Fox Business right here, and it is important to remember that this number is just for one state.  It is hard to imagine what the final numbers will look like when the livestock losses for all of the states affected by the flooding are tallied up.  This is already the worst agricultural disaster in modern American history, and the National Weather Service is telling us that there will be more catastrophic flooding throughout the middle portion of the nation for the next two months.

Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts says that this is the worst flooding that his state has ever experienced.  Ricketts originally told us that 65 out of the 93 counties in his state have declared a state of emergency, but that number has now risen to 74.  Hundreds of millions of dollars of damage has been done in his state alone, and that is just an initial estimate.

It deeply offends me that the big mainstream news channels have spent so little time covering this disaster.  This is the biggest news story of 2019 so far by a very wide margin, but because it happened in the middle of the country they are not giving it the attention that it deserves.

In the short-term, food prices will not rise too dramatically because the stores are selling the food that has already been produced.  But as the months roll along, you will start to notice food prices steadily increase.  Millions of bushels of wheat, corn and soybeans have been destroyed by the flooding so far, and thousands of farmers will not be able to plant crops at all this year.  And the livestock losses that we have already experienced will be felt for many years to come.

Beef will never be lower in price than it is right now.  So if you are a beef lover, you may want to stock up.

When the flooding initially came, it happened so fast that many farmers were powerless to do anything about it.  In Sherman County, farmer Richard Panowicz says that ice and debris were “exploding from the river”…

“Within 15 minutes it was devastation,” Panowicz said, with water, ice and debris exploding from the river with nothing to stop it.

He described some ice chunks as 3 feet thick and the size of an extended-cab pickup.

Panowicz said a lot of the dead calves he’s picked up have had broken legs. Many of the carcasses were found by neighbors.

In other cases, farmers were faced with a heartbreaking choice between saving their animals or saving their neighbors.  One farmer that rushed to help his neighbors ended up losing 30 calves to the floodwaters…

Before Mahon could think about his animals, he needed to help his neighbors. As the water rose, he rescued one with his tractor, the floodwater lifting it up and spinning him 180 degrees. He helped save three more people — including an 85-year-old woman and a 9-month-old baby — with a boat, he said.

Then he could start counting his losses. He estimated the flood carried away 30 calves and almost as many cows, nearly $50,000 out of his pocket. It might be more.

Can you imagine the grief that these farming families are enduring right now?

Many of them are financially ruined and will never be able to go back to farming again.

Dave Eaton’s family has been farming the same plot of land for 152 years.  But now the Missouri River has swallowed his farm, and with much more flooding still to come, he anticipates that his farm with be underwater “all year”…

The farm has been in his family 152 years. He was born there. He’s been thinking about what he’s learned about the Missouri’s upstream reservoirs and the mountain snowpack, and what it means for his land.

“It’s not like I’m new to the area,” he said. “My gut feeling is we’re going to be under water all year.”

And he is definitely not the only one that has had his year ruined.

Panowicz says that the hay and silage that were meant to feed his cattle this season were soaked “in 3 to 4 feet of water”…

The hay and silage to feed his cattle are soaked after sitting in 3 to 4 feet of water.

Sand now covers much of the pastureland he uses to graze his herd of commercial Angus cows and purebred Charolais bulls.

And 40 of his recently born calves died in the flood.

So what is he supposed to do?

Some Nebraska ranchers will bravely try to rebuild, but for Panowicz it appears that the end has come…

“I’ll probably sell the (remaining) cows and calves and get out of the cattle business,” said Panowicz, 65. “I’ve been around cows since the early 1970s.”

I could go on and on, but I think that you definitely get the point.

America’s farmers have been utterly devastated.  America’s cattle producers have been utterly devastated.  Food production is going to be way, way below expectations, and food prices are going to escalate dramatically in the coming months.  This is the kind of scenario that I have been warning about, and this crisis is going to continue to get worse as all the snow from one of the snowiest winters on record melts.  In Minnesota, there are still more than 20 inches of snow on the ground in some places, and all of that water has to go somewhere.

This is the biggest national crisis that has hit the United States in many years, but the mainstream media and millions of Americans that do not live in the affected areas still do not seem to get it.

Of course once food prices start getting painfully high at our supermarkets everyone will start complaining, but there will not be any easy solutions. (Click to Source)

Let’s talk about food SHORTAGE: US grain bins collapse under catastrophic Iowa floods

After millions of dead calves in Nebraska, now thousands of tons of grain lost in Iowa! Flood waters are causing havoc in some mid-western states – Iowa; Illinois; Missouri; Kansas; South Dakota; Minnesota; and Nebraska – and have resulted in an estimated $3 billion in damages so far. The video below by Iowa resident Gracie Newman shows just a fraction of the losses that have been incurred as a result of the unprecedented flooding.

As can be seen from the video, at this location alone, at least five bins have burst, destroying thousands of tons of grain.

Rising water levels have breached levees along the Missouri River and forced several towns to evacuate.

It was also reported that in the state of Nebraska (west of Iowa) the flooding has already caused more than $1 billion in damages, with more than 2,000 homes and 340 businesses lost.

Missouri Bin Collapse

In a separate incident, a grain bin which was reportedly holding 21,591t – or 850,000 bushels – of corn collapsed in the state of Missouri, in the early hours of Monday, March 11.

GRAIN BIN

The grain was washed onto a nearby road and also blocked a railway line once its container’s walls split. No one was injured in the incident, which happened at a Bunge plant in LaGrange, Missouri. (Click to Source)

Gov. Pete Ricketts: Worst flooding damage in our state’s history – As many as a million calves lost in Nebraska

“This is the biggest disaster, as far as damage, we’ve ever experienced in our state,” says Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts.

We’ve got at least 400 million in livestock losses and 140 million in crop losses, says Ricketts.

There may be as many as a million calves lost in Nebraska,” says agriculture secretary Sonny Purdue, United States Secretary of Agriculture.

You don’t believe me? Watch the video below:

Soon we will fight in the streets for food! (Click to Source)
Get online and get completely recovered! We are a Biblical Online Recovery Program that is life changing and empowering. We are Teen Challenge Certified Teachers and have integrated the world famous Teen Challenge PSNC curriculum for the most healing fusion of elements for your recovery. VRM is breaking the chains of addiction for a lifetime! Check us out!

Historic floods hit Nebraska after ‘bomb cyclone’ storm

(Reuters) – Large parts of Nebraska and the U.S. Central Plains were underwater on Saturday after a late-winter “bomb cyclone” storm triggered historic flooding along the Missouri and Platte rivers, causing two deaths, tearing apart homes and swallowing roadways.

The National Weather Service predicted dangerous flooding would continue through the weekend in Nebraska and in south and west central Iowa, particularly along the Missouri River.

“We’re still in a very widely dispersed and intense flooding situation in the eastern third of Nebraska,” said Mike Wight, a spokesman for the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency, in a phone interview.

Nebraska has had two flood-related fatalities this week, Wight said. One person died at home after failing to evacuate, although the exact cause of death was unclear, authorities said, and the other was swept away while trying to tow a trapped car with his tractor.

The Missouri River was still rising on Saturday evening, local TV station KMTV reported, with a record crest of more than 47 feet expected early on Tuesday in Brownville, Nebraska, about 70 miles south of Omaha in the eastern corner of the state.

“We’re looking at 4, 5, 6, 7 feet above the highest it’s ever been,” Wight said.

The flooding came in the wake of what meteorologists call a “bomb cyclone,” a winter hurricane that forms when the barometric pressure drops 24 millibars in 24 hours. The storm blew from the western Rockies to the Central Plains last week.

The rising water has reduced stores and homes to rubble and ripped off a long chunk of a highway bridge, according to photos posted on Twitter by Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts. Ranchers posted images on social media of their cattle being dug out of snowdrifts or stranded in fields.

The flooding has all but blocked access to some small communities along the river, where potable drinking water has become scarce as the flood has contaminated wells, Wight said.

Ricketts visited several flooded communities on Saturday and wrote on Twitter that he witnessed “unbelievable devastation.”

“The whole state is pulling together as we respond to and recover from the ongoing #NebraskaFlood! #NebraskaStrong,” the governor tweeted. (Click to Source)

Reporting by Gabriella Borter; Editing by Richard Chang

 

Get online and get completely recovered! We are a Biblical Online Recovery Program that is life changing and empowering. We are Teen Challenge Certified Teachers and have integrated the world famous Teen Challenge PSNC curriculum for the most healing fusion of elements for your recovery. VRM is breaking the chains of addiction for a lifetime! Check us out!