Torah Commentary – Emor (Speak) – “Small Matters” – Day 15, Month 2, 5777; 11 May 2017

Torah Commentary
Emor (Speak)
Leviticus 21:1-24:23
Ezekiel 44:15-31
Matthew 5:38-42
Galatians 3:26-29

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“Small Matters”
The Book of Leviticus is devoted to the subject of what is clean and what is not clean. Simply put, we should desire to live our lives pursuing that which Yah calls clean and stay away from what He calls unclean. In doing so, it is not only so we can live a life of blessing and closeness to Him, but so we may also show forth His holy character to others.
In this Torah portion His name, YH VH, is used 81 times. We see a summary of instructions for His Feasts. We also find something I want to draw attention to. The word profane is used 12 times. We find Webster’s dictionary defines the word profane as “irreverence for that which is sacred.” Strong’s Concordance has many definitions, one of which is to “make common.” These definitions supply descriptions that may differ from what we would normally consider profane to mean.
Consider it this way. For most of us, trees in our living rooms and decorated eggs hidden in the yard are practices that have become distant memories. We would look back to those practices and call them unclean. Now we have the blessing of celebrating Feasts that have been called clean by our King. However, is it possible to observe the Feasts clearly taught in Scripture and make them unclean? Go back to the definition of Webster, “irreverence for that which is sacred.” His Feasts are sacred, if we do not reverence them in Light of Him, we can make them unclean in His sight. Read Amos 5:21“”I hate, I utterly loathe your festivals; I take no pleasure in your solemn assemblies.” The people were “doing” the Feasts, but in such a way that Yah not only said He hated them, but He no longer called them His.
How do we keep from making the same mistakes of our ancestors? Take a moment to reflect on your last Shabbat, Passover, Unleavened Bread, New Moon, the current counting of the Omer. Without looking at a sheet of paper or a calendar, what day is it on the counting? What was the Torah portion for last Shabbat? Do you recall its overall theme? Did you even bother to read it? Are you napping through Leviticus? Can you tell what phase the moon is in right now?
Do I need to go on? Consider your answers to the above questions. Answer truthfully. In the eyes of Yah, was your last Shabbat clean or unclean? Was your celebration of the last New Moon more “common” than sacred? How many days of counting the Omer have you missed?
In Luke 16 we read about faithfulness. Verse 10 says, “Someone who is trustworthy in a small matter is also trustworthy in large ones, and someone who is dishonest in a small matter is also dishonest in large ones. ” How are we doing in the “small matters” like counting the Omer? Is our reverence or lack of reverence in what many would call a small matter affecting the weightier matters? I can only answer for myself on this one. Today we are in the middle of the Counting of the Omer. Though we do not have a place in Jerusalem to take an offering to and perform our daily counting, Scripture still tells us to count. How we do so may be as simple as acknowledging a number or adding Scripture readings and prayer. Question is, “How important is the counting to us?” Is it something we are looking forward to every day or do we let a few days go by and realize we have forgotten? Are we allowing the counting to become common? (Click to Article)

 

Torah Commentary – Emor “Say” – Time for Review – Joined To HaShem

Torah Commentary

Emor “Say”

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Leviticus 21:1-24:23

Ezekiel 44:15-31

2Corinthians 1-6

 

Time for Review

 Anyone who has read the Torah knows that many commandments and instructions are repeated many times.  The simple reason is that our Creator knows us very well.  He understands the way we think and the way we tend to forget, unless things are repeated and maybe even then.

 In Leviticus 23 we see a review of the Feasts.  Let’s look at each one briefly as a review.

 Shabbat – Because of His work in our lives we should enjoy rest, both spiritual and physical.  We are to cease from endless striving for our redemption.  Yeshua has accomplished this for us and we rest in Him.  We are also to give our bodies physical rest on the Shabbat.

 Passover – We remember the slavery we were once living and celebrate our being set free to live a new life.

 First Fruits – As Yeshua was the first to be raised from the dead, we will also be raised from this life and enter into His likeness.

 Unleavened Bread – Leaven is a type of sin.  We are to be conformed into His sinless image through obedience to His word.

 Pentecost – We celebrate the instructions He has given to us and the Spirit He has placed in us to enable us to walk in those instructions.  The work of Passover in not truly complete until we have been given a new way of life in Torah.

 Feast of Trumpets – Life is a wonderful gift, but we look for a day of complete restoration.  One day the shofar will sound, His family will be gathered into His presence and we will forever be with Him.

 Day of Atonement – While in this life we should “work out our own salvation with fear and trembling.”  We are to live our lives unto Him, knowing that one day we will all give an account for the way we lived.  On that day we will stand alone, not with friends and family.  On that day it will not matter what anyone else thinks, it will only matter what He knows.

 Tabernacles – The day of final and complete redemption!  The day when all the work of this life will be over.  Sin will have been dealt with for all eternity.  We will be His people and He will be our Elohim!  He will “Tabernacle” in the midst of His people and of His Kingdom there shall be no end.

 You may have noticed the Feasts tend to switch back and forth from the here and now to the hereafter.  I believe there is good reason for this.  The Feasts are another reminder to be like Abraham.  Although he was in this world he was never attached to this world.  He was always looking for a city whose builder and maker was Elohim.  The Feasts should cause us to live this life in fear and reverence of a Holy Creator and to always keep an eye toward the Eastern Sky and eternity.

 With the world situation the way it is today, I am reminded of the Jewish people who lived through the Warsaw ghettos.  When asked if they had kept Shabbat in the ghetto they said, “It is not that we kept Shabbat, but Shabbat kept us.”  I wonder if one day we will be overheard saying that during the tribulation it was not that we kept the Feasts, but the Feasts kept us?

 

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