Is Greece about to Recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s Capital?

  • Two distinguished members of Greece’s parliament, whose party has a good chance of defeating the current leadership, are breathing new life into the political system and reinvigorating crucial partnerships with Israel and the United States.
  • “The positions of the Palestinians are maximalist and dangerous, since they actually propose the Islamization of the city. Palestinian Islamist organizations, like Hamas and Islamic Jihad, have repeatedly launched threats against the non-Muslim population of Jerusalem. Islamists visualize a Jerusalem without churches and synagogues. On the other hand, the Israeli Knesset has recognized since 1980 the multi-religious character of Jerusalem and is committed to the unimpeded access of all believers to places of worship…” — MP Makis Voridis, a former minister from the New Democracy party, writing in the Greek daily Kathimerini.

On his return from a recent two-day trip to Israel — where he met with high-level officials — Adonis Georgiadis, the vice president of Greece’s opposition party, New Democracy, declared his support for recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

In an interview with Skai Radio on March 7, Georgiadis called it “almost funny to discuss whether Jerusalem is a Jewish city or not.”

“[It] was founded by the Jews… in ancient times. You can read Flavius Josephus or read Diodoros Siceliotis and see the references to the city of Jerusalem, where there was the High Priest of Solomon’s Temple and that it was the city of the Jews. This is the reality.”

When challenged by the interviewer, who said, “But as time went by, many things happened in the city’s history,” Georgiadis, a historian, replied:

“I don’t disagree, but this city is from the beginning a Jewish city. They [Jews] made it; they founded it; it’s theirs… Now, President Trump’s decision to transfer the US Embassy to Jerusalem is a little bit provocative… But I have to say… that I am in favor of this decision rather than against it.”

Two days earlier, on March 5, MP Makis Voridis, a former minister from the New Democracy party, expressed a similar position in an op-ed in the Greek daily Kathimerini:

“President Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel is right and fair. The country [Israel] deserves the full support of the US and Europe, because it is the only liberal democracy in the Middle East. Israel is neighboring states with authoritarian regimes that do not sufficiently safeguard human rights. Despite numerous external threats, this small country still retains its liberal and pluralistic character. Individual freedoms are constitutionally guaranteed; women’s rights are fully respected; and Arab-Israeli citizens (20% of the population) have a high standard of living.”

He continued:

“The Palestinian side has not shown any intention to negotiate seriously with the Jerusalem government. The positions of the Palestinians are maximalist and dangerous, since they actually propose the Islamization of the city. Palestinian Islamist organizations, like Hamas and Islamic Jihad, have repeatedly launched threats against the non-Muslim population of Jerusalem. Islamists visualize a Jerusalem without churches and synagogues. On the other hand, the Israeli Knesset has recognized since 1980 the multi-religious character of Jerusalem and is committed to the unimpeded access of all believers to places of worship (Basic Law 5740).”

Both Georgiadis and Voridis entered the New Democracy party at the behest of former Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras, who is reported to be a personal friend of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. During his term as prime minister, from 2012 to 2015, Samaras worked hard to enhance the Greece-Israel relationship, which had been stagnant for decades. Judging by the polls — according to which the New Democracy party is almost certain to beat the ruling Syriza party, headed by Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras — strengthening ties with Jerusalem and Washington is supported by a majority of the Greek public.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (right) meets with then Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras on October 8, 2013 in Jerusalem, Israel. (Photo by Amos Ben Gershom/GPO via Getty Images)

Many political analysts are predicting that by autumn 2018, the Tsipras government will announce new elections; it has lost a large share of its base, due to exorbitant taxation, on the one hand, and a loss of voter confidence in the government’s foreign policy and domestic security on the other.

It is very encouraging for the future of Greece that two distinguished parliament members, whose party has a good chance of defeating the current leadership, are breathing new life into the political system and reinvigorating crucial partnerships with Israel and the United States.

Maria Polizoidou, a reporter, broadcast journalist, and consultant on international and foreign affairs, is based in Greece. She has a post-graduate degree in “Geopolitics and Security Issues in the Islamic complex of Turkey and Middle East” from the University of Athens. (Click to Source)

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Is the United Nations Fulfilling Ancient Biblical Prophecy?

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On Dec. 21, 2017, the U.N. united as one to stand against one city on the planet: Jerusalem. Twenty-five centuries earlier, the prophet Zechariah wrote these words from the Lord, “I will gather all the nations against Jerusalem for battle” (Zech. 14:2a) Did the U.N. just move us one step closer to fulfilling this ancient prophecy?

Before answering this question, let’s look at the events on the ground.

First, the U.N. once again distinguished itself for hypocrisy by targeting Israel for its criticism—specifically, America’s support of Israel—while remaining silent on so many issues of world importance.

What has the U.N. been doing during the horrific war in Syria? Where has the U.N. been during the attempted genocide of Christians in the Middle East? Decades earlier, what did the U.N. have to say about Tiananmen Square in China or Saddam Hussein’s chemical warfare against the Kurds? Yet when America recognizes Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, the U.N. is an uproar.

As I noted previously, groups like UNWatch.org have documented the U.N’.s consistent policy of singling out Israel for rebuke and condemnation while virtually ignoring atrocities committed on a mass scale by other nations, including Israel’s neighbors.

To give one case in point, during the UN General Assembly’s 61st session (2006-2007), “the time spent by ambassadors on enacting the 22nd anti-Israel resolution of the year was time not spent on passing a single resolution on Sudan’s genocide in Darfur.”

So, while Sudanese Christians were being slaughtered en masse by Muslim soldiers and gangs, the U.N. General Assembly spent its time enacting 22 anti-Israel resolutions.

In 2015, as noted by Israeli journalist Noga Gur-Arieh, “At the closing of the 59th U.N. Commission on the Status of Women … only one political resolution was passed; one that accuses Israel of mistreating Palestinian women, in all aspects of life.”

A similar resolution was passed in 2016 by the same U.N. Commission.

So, of all the nations on earth, only Israel was singled out for its alleged mistreatment of women.

That’s why Abba Eban, Israel’s legendary diplomat, once remarked, “If Algeria introduced a resolution declaring that the earth was flat and that Israel had flattened it, it would pass by a vote of 164 to 13 with 26 abstentions.”

Second, in anticipation of the U.N. vote, the United States handled things exactly as it should have: with a strong word of rebuke and warning.

After all, different international leaders did not simply call President Trump and say, “We strongly differ with your recognition of Jerusalem.” Instead, in the most public forum available, 128 nations stood together to condemn America for doing was what right and righteous, declaring our decision “null and void.”

Nikki Haley’s words to the UN before the vote said it all: “To its shame, the United Nations has long been a hostile place for the state of Israel. Both the current and the previous Secretary-Generals have objected to the U.N.’s disproportionate focus on Israel. It’s a wrong that undermines the credibility of this institution, and that in turn is harmful for the entire world.”

Good for you, Mrs. Haley. Call the U.N. on the carpet.

Then, after articulating all the good our country does around the world, along with its support for the U.N., she rebuked the U.N. for disrespecting America, saying, “The United States will remember this day in which it was singled out for attack in the General Assembly for the very act of exercising our right as a sovereign nation. We will remember it when we are called upon to once again make the world’s largest contribution to the United Nations, and so many countries come calling on us, as they so often do, to pay even more and to use our influence for their benefit.”

And finally: “America will put our embassy in Jerusalem. That is what the American people want us to do and it is the right thing to do. This vote will make a difference in how Americans look at the U.N. And this vote will be remembered.”

Here, here, Ambassador Haley!

Third, the seven nations that stood with Israel and America today are a most unusual group, consisting of Guatemala, Honduras, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Togo and Palau. Honestly, now, how many of us heard of some of these countries before? And how many of us could locate some of them on the map?

Whether it was out of economic dependence on the USA, a connection to Israel, or something else, these nations should be remembered for good in the days to come. They did what was courageous and correct.

As for the countries that abstained (35 in all), two (the Czech Republic and the Philippines) already stated they are considering relocating their embassies; a number of African nations have developed solid ties with Israel; some might have considered their need for American dollars and others might have remembered Israel’s kindness to them (such as Mexico, which was greatly aided by Israel after their disastrous earthquake in September, although Mexico did use its floor time to speak critically).

Already, “U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley invited representatives of countries who didn’t vote in favor of the United Nations General Assembly’s Jerusalem resolution to a reception as ‘thank you for your friendship to the United States.'”

Donald Trump has always appreciated loyalty.

But what of the matter of ancient prophecy? Is there a connection between the U.N.’s vote and the Bible?

I would say yes, for at least three reasons: 1) The vote confirms international hostility towards a Jewish Jerusalem. 2) The vote reminds us that the biblical authors were inspired when predicting that an end-time coalition of nations would come against a Jewish Jerusalem. 3) The vote tells us that, just as Scripture indicates, the city of Jerusalem alone is the whole world’s business (see Zech. 12:3).

Of course, this does not set a time frame for a united attack on a Jewish Jerusalem, and we don’t know if “all nations” (in the words of Zechariah) means every nation on earth or simply a worldwide coalition. But, after watching the last 2,500 years of history, coupled with the U.N.’s anti-Jerusalem vote this week, it’s hard to read the Bible and think that the writers just guessed things right. What are the chances of that? (Click to Source)