CERN points giant magnet at the Sun to look for dark matter particles

Axions don’t show up yet, but that doesn’t mean they’re not out there.

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With the identification of the Higgs boson at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, scientists put the last piece of the Standard Model of physics in place. What they haven’t found is any hint of something beyond the Standard Model. And that hasn’t been for lack of trying. Supersymmetry, the most popular extension to the Standard Model, predicts a large collection of additional particles. We’ve looked for them and, so far, they have not shown up.

But some extensions of the Standard Model don’t predict the sorts of heavy particles that the LHC is designed to identify. Instead, they suggest there’s a very light force-carrying particle called an axion. With the right properties, an axion could solve issues in everything from particle interactions up to the scale of galaxy clusters. But its tiny mass and odd behavior means it won’t be detected in the LHC.

But that doesn’t mean the LHC’s hardware can’t find it. Clever engineers at CERN took magnets originally designed for the LHC, combined them with X-ray focusing technology originally designed for space, and built a device that could spot axions arriving here from the Sun. So far, it has seen no sign of them, which places some strict limits on the properties of these hypothetical particles.

Putting limits on our imagination

Physicists don’t just come up with hypothetical particles for fun. (Well, they might enjoy doing it, but it’s not solely for fun.) They prefer their particles to be what they call “well motivated,” meaning there’s a good reason for proposing them. In the case of axions, that motivation came from quantum chromodynamics, which describes the interactions of quarks and gluons. Axions were proposed to provide a theoretical explanation for why these particles appear to be indifferent to the direction of time (technically called “time-reversal invariance”).

Since then, other types of axions have been proposed, but they all share a critical property: they have mass (although not very much). This makes them possible dark matter candidates, since they should be present in our Universe in very large numbers. (Click to Article)

Stephen Hawking – Higgs Boson Could Spell The End of The Universe -The Imminent Danger of That Power Potential is That it Could End Time Any Time Soon!

God’s word says what will happen to the earth.

Knowing this first, that there shall come in the last days scoffers, walking after their own lusts,

And saying, Where is the promise of his coming? for since the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as they were from the beginning of the creation.

For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water:

Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished:

But the heavens and the earth, which are now, by the same word are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men.

But, beloved, be not ignorant of this one thing, that one day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day.

The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.

But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night; in the which the heavens shall pass away with a great noise, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat, the earth also and the works that are therein shall be burned up. 2 Peter 3:3-10

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Stephen Hawking – Higgs Boson Could Spell The End of The Universe

Professor Stephen Hawking has told the BBC that artificial intelligence could spell the end for the human race.
In an interview after the launch of a new software system designed to help him communicate more easily, he said there were many benefits to new technology but also some risks.

What is a Higgs Boson?

Fermilab scientist Don Lincoln describes the nature of the Higgs boson. Several large experimental groups are hot on the trail of this elusive subatomic particle which is thought to explain the origins of particle mass.

Via : .rt.com

Higgs’ elementary particle underpins existence in our universe might become unstable, warns renowned physicist Stephen Hawking. The energy potential of the ‘God particle’ is so vital for the entire universe it could make the cosmos collide, he concludes.

In a preface to a new book he contributed to, which is essentially a collection of lectures gives by famous scientists and astronomers called ‘Starmus’, Hawking shared his concerns regarding the Higgs Boson, that Hawkins suspects of being unstable and potentially capable of decay.

“The Higgs potential has the worrisome feature that it might become metastable at energies above 100bn gigaelectronvolts (GeV),” Hawking wrote. (Click to Article)

CERN deny that the Hadron Collider caused Italy’s recent earthquakes after bizarre claims that ‘plasma blasting experiment’ was responsible for tremors

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  • Conspiracy theorists have blamed the CERN facility for Italy earthquakes
  • One suggested the Large Hadron Collider unleashes massive power
  • Another theorist suggested aliens could invade Earth using the collider
  • CERN has insisted that the Large Hadron Collider is entirely safe

CERN has denied claims the Large Hadron Collider was responsible for a recent string of earthquakes in Italy.

The BP Earthwatch organisation posted a video on its YouTube page which claimed the massive machine on the French-Swiss border could have prompted the earthquakes.

The conspiracy site claims the LHC could have triggered the earthquakes in August which killed more than 200 people and caused severe shocks last month.

Scientists at the Geneva-based European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), had been trying to discover a new particle – in addition to the 2012 discovering of the Higgs Boson – God particle.

However, after initial excitement of a breakthrough, scientists acknowledged the discovery was a ‘statistical burp’ rather than a new particle which would have re-written the physics books.  (Click to Article)