Iran Nuclear Talks Stall as Contradictions Among Powers Emerge

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Iran and six world powers weren’t able to seal a deal to curb the Islamic Republic’s disputed nuclear program on the first of two days of talks, which ended with the two sides still far apart.

The optimistic tone officials struck at the close of a previous round of negotiations in Almaty, Kazakhstan, six weeks ago faded last night as contradictory signals emerged from Iran and the six nations negotiating with the Islamic Republic.

Diplomats from the U.S., the U.K., France, Germany, Russia and China met with Iranian officials for more than five hours yesterday. The Iranians met separately with the Chinese, Russian, British and German delegates, and the full group will convene again today, officials said.

Iran’s deputy negotiator said that his side had offered “practical” suggestions to resolve the nuclear dispute, and the head of Russia’s delegation, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov, called the Islamic Republic’s response “refreshing.”

Western diplomats complained that Iran failed to respond to the specifics of a confidence-building proposal made six weeks ago that would ease some economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for Iran’s curbing uranium enrichment.

A failure to make progress in this second round of negotiations in Kazakhstan would bring new pressure on Iran. The Islamic Republic, already subject to dozens of international sanctions on oil, banking, trade and shipping, will face additional economic penalties if it fails to work toward a deal, U.S. officials said. Israel and the U.S. have also threatened to use military force to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon.

Iranian Threat

Iran, with the world’s fourth-largest proven oil reserves, has threatened to stop crude shipments through the Strait of Hormuz if attacked.

Commodity markets so far haven’t reacted to the stalemate. Oil rose to a nine-month high of $119 a barrel on Feb. 8 on concern that tension with Iran would disrupt Middle East oil exports. Prices subsequently have declined as signs of a wider conflict eased.

Brent crude for May settlement declined $2.22, or 2.1 percent, to end the session at $104.12 a barrel on the London- based ICE Futures Europe exchange, the lowest closing price since July 24. Trading was 79 percent above the 100-day average.

While Iran has sought a broad lifting of the sanctions saddling its economy, world powers have offered an interim deal: a partial easing of the restrictions in return for Iran halting its enrichment of uranium to 20 percent purity. Iran says it needs the medium-enriched uranium for isotopes to treat cancer patients, while other nations have said that the uranium could easily be further enriched to create weapons-grade material.

Sunk Costs

It may be difficult for leaders in Tehran to offer concessions because of Iranian national pride in the nuclear science program and sunk costs estimated at $100 billion and rising, according to a study by researchers at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Federation of American Scientists in Washington.

Iran wants to define the “final outcome” of the international negotiations, Ali Bagheri, deputy secretary of Iran’s supreme national security council, told reporters yesterday afternoon. The six powers entered the talks seeking “concrete” responses to the confidence-building proposal made six weeks ago, European Union spokesman Michael Mann said.

Iran didn’t respond to the international community’s proposal, and instead reiterated its desire for a comprehensive nuclear resolution, according to Western officials at the talks.

‘Indisputable Fact’

Russian delegate Ryabkov appeared to contradict the U.S. and Western European position, saying it was “an indisputable fact” that the Iranian delegation “addressed concrete elements of the position outlined by the group of six.” The Iranian reply, he said, was “evidence that the negotiations are serious.”

“We are not going over the same things and that’s refreshing,” he said. Still, Ryabkov declined to predict how the meeting would end.

One Western diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity, said that while the two sides had a long and substantial discussion, they remain far apart.

Failure to produce some interim deal in Almaty could stall further talks, fueling an escalation of sanctions and military threats, according to analyst Mark Dubowitz, executive director of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies in Washington.

“Time for peaceful pressure is running out,” said Dubowitz, who advises U.S. lawmakers on sanctions. “If the Almaty talks fail, Congress likely will move forward on new sanctions that will massively intensify the economic pressure on Iran.”

Limited Time

In an interview on the sidelines of the talks in Almaty, Ali Vaez, a senior analyst with the Washington-based International Crisis Group, said that “in the absence of concrete progress,” international negotiators “can’t sustain this process for much longer.”

While receiving formal recognition of its “right” to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes isn’t a precondition at the meeting in Almaty, Iran wants to know that right will be recognized eventually, said an Iranian official who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Iran’s insistence on knowing the “endgame” rather than making an interim agreement first, puts the talks at risk, Vaez said. In conversations with Iranian officials, he said he had advised agreement “on a limited deal that would break this vicious cycle.”

Enriched Uranium

Enriched uranium is used to power electric power plants and make medical isotopes. Highly enriched uranium, or HEU, is needed to produce nuclear weapons.

After a decade-long standoff, during which agreements to continue talking were defined as success, both sides remain entrenched. A United Nations investigation, international sanctions, military threats and diplomacy all have failed to ease international concerns that Iran is developing the ability to make nuclear weapons.

Iran, with 75 million people and a $484 billion economy, has maintained that its program is peaceful and within the boundaries of the international nuclear non-proliferation treaty.

Iran’s chief nuclear negotiator, Saeed Jalili, called the previous Almaty negotiating round a “turning point” after its Feb. 27 conclusion. Ryabkov said in an interview during those talks that the group offered to ease restrictions on Iran’s exports of petrochemical products and some additional items.

Iran Tests

Patrick Clawson, director of research at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said in an interview that Iran’s willingness to adopt confidence-building measures such as greater access for UN inspectors or unilateral steps to make its enriched uranium less useful for a weapons program is a test of “whether talks are worth continuing.”

Bagheri of Iran said yesterday that “actions referred to as confidence-building measures must be considered part of a larger, more comprehensive plan. They are not separate.”

“The credibility of the process itself is on the line this time around,” Suzanne Maloney, an Iran analyst at the Brookings Institution in Washington, said in an e-mail interview from the United Arab Emirates. “I think we need the win more than” the Iranians “do, despite the presumptions to the contrary among many U.S. policy makers.”

Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araghchi, a member of the country’s nuclear negotiating team, said the diplomatic process should be expected to move slowly and be fraught with challenges. Iran should be rewarded with the lifting of sanctions along the way or it won’t continue on the path, Araghchi said.

‘New Approach’

“If there is balance between steps to be taken by the two sides, we likely will be able to start a new approach, and this new trend will be long and will require many steps,” he was quoted as saying in an interview with the state-run Mehr news agency. “There are great obstacles” that require “patience and resistance” to overcome, he said.

“President Obama says that there is an open door in front of Iran, but the Iranians are very skeptical,” said Trita Parsi, author of “A Single Roll of the Dice: Obama’s Diplomacy with Iran” and president of National Iranian-American Council. “Even if an agreement can be reached on 20 percent, Iran is not likely to accept unless it has clarity on what the end game is.”

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UN General Assembly votes in favor of Palestinian statehood

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The U.N. General Assembly voted Thursday in favor of Palestinian statehood, after the Palestinians asked it to recognize a non-member state of Palestine in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and east Jerusalem, and the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip.

The resolution upgrading the Palestinians’ status to a nonmember observer state at the United Nations was approved by a more than two-thirds majority of the 193-member world body — a vote of 138 to 9, with the U.S. and Israel among those who opposed. There were 41 abstentions.

Real independence, however, remains an elusive dream until the Palestinians negotiate a peace deal with the Israelis, who warned that the General Assembly action will only delay a lasting solution. Israel still controls the West Bank, east Jerusalem and access to Gaza, and it accused the Palestinians of bypassing negotiations with the campaign to upgrade their U.N. status.

The United States immediately criticized the historic vote. “Today’s unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstacles in the path peace,” U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice said.

And U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called the vote “unfortunate” and “counterproductive.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called the speech by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to the General Assembly shortly before the vote “defamatory and venomous,” saying it was “full of mendacious propaganda” against Israel.

Abbas had told the General Assembly that it was “being asked today to issue the birth certificate of Palestine.” Abbas said the vote is the last chance to save the two-state solution.

After the vote, Netanyahu said the UN move violated past agreements between Israel and the Palestinians and that Israel would act accordingly, without elaborating what steps it might take.

Just before the vote, Israel’s U.N. ambassador, Ron Prosor, warned the General Assembly that “the Palestinians are turning their backs on peace” and that the U.N. can’t break the 4,000-year-old bond between the people of Israel and the land of Israel.

The vote had been certain to succeed, with most of the member states sympathetic to the Palestinians. Several key countries, including France, this week announced they would support the move to elevate the Palestinians from the status of U.N. observer to nonmember observer state.

Thursday’s vote came on the same day, Nov. 29, that the U.N. General Assembly in 1947 voted to recognize a state in Palestine, with the jubilant revelers then Jews. The Palestinians rejected that partition plan, and decades of tension and violence have followed.

The vote grants Abbas an overwhelming international endorsement for his key position: establishment of a Palestinian state in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and east Jerusalem, the territories captured by Israel in the 1967 Mideast war. With Netanyahu opposed to a pullback to the 1967 lines, this should strengthen Abbas’ hand if peace talks resume.

The overwhelming vote also could help Abbas restore some of his standing, which has been eroded by years of standstill in peace efforts. His rival, Hamas, deeply entrenched in Gaza, has seen its popularity rise after an Israeli offensive on targets linked to the Islamic militant group there earlier this month.

Israel has stepped back from initial threats of harsh retaliation for the Palestinians seeking U.N. recognition, but government officials warned that Israel would respond to any Palestinian attempts to use the upgraded status to confront Israel in international bodies.

The Palestinians now can gain access to U.N. agencies and international bodies, most significantly the International Criminal Court, which could become a springboard for going after Israel for alleged war crimes or its ongoing settlement building on war-won land.

However, in the run-up to the U.N. vote, Abbas signaled that he wants recognition to give him leverage in future talks with Israel, and not as a tool for confronting or delegitimizing Israel, as Israeli leaders have alleged.

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Is Egypt about to become the new Iran?

It is not only the anti-government protesters in Egypt’s Tahrir Square who should be concerned about President Mohammed Morsi’s audacious power grab. Mr Morsi’s claim at the weekend that “God’s will and elections made me the captain of this ship” has echoes of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini’s claim during the 1979 Iranian revolution that his mission to overthrow the Shah enjoyed divine guidance.

Since his announcement that he was granting himself sweeping new powers, Mr Morsi has been trying to reassure sceptical Egyptian voters that he has no ambition to become Egypt’s new Pharaoh. But you only have to look at the violent scenes that have once again erupted in Tahrir Square to see that the majority of Egyptians remain unconvinced.

When Egyptian demonstrators first occupied Tahrir Square last year to call for the overthrow of Mr Morsi’s predecessor, President Hosni Mubarak, they were calling for a secular, democratic system of government that would represent the interests of all Egyptians, and not just the corrupt clique of presidential supporters. Similar sentiments were expressed by Iranian demonstrators during the build-up to the Shah’s overthrow in February 1979 as they sought to remove a similarly corrupt regime.

But as we now know to our cost, the worthy aspirations of the Iranian masses were hijacked by Khomeini’s hardline Islamist agenda, and within months of the Shah’s overthrow Iran had been transformed into an Islamic republic.

Mr Morsi says he has no desire to become a dictator, but his announcement that, henceforth, all presidential decrees will be immune from legal challenge does not bode well for Egypt’s transition from military dictatorship to democracy.

I am sure I am not the only one wondering whether Mr Morsi is about to become the new Ayatollah Khomeini.

Certainly, unless Mr Morsi backs down, all those who sacrificed their lives in the cause of the Egyptian revolution will have died in vain.

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Islamic Terrorists Bomb Egyptian-Gaza Border Base

Terrorists destroyed part of an Egyptian base at Rafiah, challenging Cairo’s control over the Sinai after the ceasefire with Israel.


Islamic terrorists destroyed part of an Egyptian security building at Rafiah Saturday night, challenging Cairo’s control over the Sinai after the ceasefire with Israel. No one was injured in the explosion at the base, under construction n the Egyptians side of Rafiah, the smuggling capital of Gaza.

The attack came 48 hours after Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi granted himself extensive new powers, which were challenged by Cairo’s judiciary.

A separate explosion injured three people further south in the Sinai, where Egypt is building a facility to help it protect the pipeline that ships natural gas to Israel and Jordan. Terrorists have bombed the pipeline more than a dozen times the past two years in an effort to scuttle the agreement to sell gas to Israel.

Saturdays night’s bombing underlined Egypt’s difficulty in re-asserting control over the Sinai, where Hamas terrorists from Gaza, along with Bedouin allies and Al Qaeda-linked terrorist cells, have carved out regions of authority. They have staged increasingly frequent terrorist attacks on Israel. Several Israelis have been killed in the attacks.

Maintaining peace and quiet in the Sinai is a primary task for Egypt, experts said; the new government needs to prove to the United States, Israel, and Hamas that it can carry out its promise to protect Israel from terrorists.

Attacks from the Sinai could undermine the truce, moving the field of battle into the Sinai and eventually spreading back into Gaza, even if Hamas abides by the ceasefire that ended the eight-day Pillar of Defense counterterrorist operation

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Egypt’s Brotherhood calls for protests, judges urge for strikes

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood called for protests across the country on Sunday to support President Mohammed Mursi, while the country’s judges urged for a nationwide strike against a decree they saw as granting Mursi new, extensive powers.

The Brotherhood’s protest requests came as Egypt’s Judges Club, a body that represents judges throughout the country, called for “the suspension of work in all courts and prosecution administrations,” after several hours of emergency talks in response to what they called Mursi’s “ferocious attack on Egyptian justice.”

On the ground, clashes erupted outside the High Court between supporters and opponents of Mursi’s new constitutional declaration while the Judges Club held an hours-long emergency meeting inside.

“Some supporters of the declaration shot off fireworks at the gates of the court, and police fired teargas at protesters after they attempted to storm the building,” reported Egypt Independent.

Protesters favoring the declaration started chanting “the people demand the execution of Abdel Maguid,” according to the newspaper, in reference to former Prosecutor General Mahmoud Abdel Meguid, who was sacked after Mursi’s new declaration and was attending the meeting inside.

During Saturday’s meeting, defiant Egyptian judges demanded the president retract a decree granting himself sweeping powers that put him beyond judicial oversight.

As the judges met, civil groups led former U.N. nuclear watchdog chief Mohamed ElBaradei, and former presidential candidates Hamdeen Sabbahi, Amr Mussa and Abdelmoneim Abul Futuh, said there could be no dialogue with Mursi until he rescinded the decree.

“We refuse any dialogue with the president until he cancels the constitutional declaration,” according to a joint statement read out at a news conference.

Several judicial bodies have condemned Mursi’s decree, with the Supreme Judicial Council, denouncing it as “an unprecedented attack on the independence of the judiciary and its rulings.”

Earlier on Saturday, the Judges Club of Alexandria announced a strike in the provinces of Alexandria and Beheira and said they “will accept nothing less than the cancellation of (Mursi’s decree),” which violates the principle of separation of powers, club chief Mohammed Ezzat al-Agwa said.

In the same vain, Egypt’s Shura council (upper house of parliament), dominated mainly by Islamists, said it will hold a meeting Sunday morning to discuss the repercussions of the declaration, according to Al Arabiya.

The president already held both and executive and legislative powers, and his Thursday decree puts him beyond judicial oversight until a new constitution has been ratified in a referendum.

The decree also means that the Islamist-dominated panel drawing up a new constitution can no longer be touched and gives it a two-month extension until February to complete its work.

Rallies by Mursi supporters, foes

A hard core group of opposition activists spent the night in Tahrir Square — the epicentre of the anti-Mubarak uprising — where they erected some 30 tents, an AFP correspondent reported.When others attempted to join them in the morning, police fired volleys of tear gas and forced them to retreat into surrounding streets, reported AFP.

The mainly secular liberals say they are determined to keep up the momentum of protests against Mursi’s decree and have called a new mass protest in Tahrir onTuesday.

The Muslim Brotherhood called on its own supporters to take to the streets on Tuesday in Abdeen Square, just streets away from Tahrir, to show their support for Mursi.

“Egypt is at the start of a new revolution because it was never our intention to replace one dictator with another,” activist Mohammed al-Gamal told AFP, showing his broken spectacles and hand in a plaster cast than he said were the result of police action.

Washington, which only Wednesday voiced fulsome praise for Mursi’s role in brokering a truce between Israel and Gaza’s Hamas rulers to end eight days of deadly violence, led international criticism of the Islamist president’s move.

But a spokesman for the Freedom and Justice Party, headed by Mursi before his election, said the president’s decree was necessary to cut short the turbulent transition.

“We need stability,” said Murad Ali. “That’s not going to happen if we go back again to allowing the judges, who have personal reasons, to dissolve the constituent assembly in order to prolong the transitional phase.”

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Israeli government websites under mass hacking attack

More than 44 million hacking attempts have been made on Israeli government web sites since Wednesday when Israel began its Gaza air strikes, the government said on Sunday.

Finance Minister Yuval Steinitz said just one hacking attempt was successful on a site he did not want to name, but it was up and running after 10 minutes of downtime.

Typically, there are a few hundred hacking attempts a day on Israeli sites, the ministry said.

Attempts on defence-related sites have been the highest, while 10 million attempts have been made on the site of Israel’s president, 7 million on the Foreign Ministry and 3 million on the site of the prime minister.

A ministry spokesman said while the attacks have come from around the world, most have been from Israel and the Palestinian territories.

“The ministry’s computer division will continue to block the millions of cyber attacks,” Steinitz said. “We are enjoying the fruits of our investment in recent years in developing computerized defence systems.”

Steinitz has instructed his ministry to operate in emergency mode to counter attempts to undermine government sites.

Both sides in the Gaza conflict, but particularly Israel, are embracing the social media as one of their tools of warfare. The Israeli Defense Force has established a presence on nearly every platform available while Palestinian militants are active on Twitter.

“The war is taking place on three fronts. The first is physical, the second is on the world of social networks and the third is cyber,” said Carmela Avner, Israel’s chief information officer.

Last month, U.S. Defence Secretary Leon Panetta said cyberspace is the battlefield of the future, with attackers already going after banks and other financial systems. U.S. banks have been under sustained attack by suspected Iranian hackers thought to be responding to economic sanctions aimed at forcing Tehran to negotiate over its nuclear program.

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Israel ready to ‘significantly expand’ Gaza offensive

Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued a stern warning to Hamas on Sunday, declaring that the Israeli army was prepared to significantly widen its Gaza offensive. Netanyahu’s threat came as Hamas launched a fresh rocket attack on Tel Aviv.

The Israeli army is ready to “significantly expand” its operation in Gaza, the country’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Sunday as Hamas launched fresh rocket attacks on Tel Aviv.
Speaking at the start of the weekly cabinet meeting, Netanyahu said “The soldiers are ready for any activity that could take place”.
Netanyahu issued the warning as Israel’s “Iron Dome” system intercepted two rockets aimed at Tel Aviv. Hamas militants admitted responsibility for the latest rocket attack on Israel’s commercial capital.
Israel’s Foreign Ministry told FRANCE24 that a ground offensive into Gaza was likely if the rocket attacks continued.
“Our sole aim of this offensive is to make Hamas stop firing rockets. We have used air strikes but if that’s not enough then we may contemplate ground operations as well,” Ygal Palmor from the Israeli foreign ministry told FRANCE 24 on Sunday.
“If rockets are being fired then that will bring the ground operation forward,” he added.
Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman also said on Sunday that Israel would not negotiate a truce with the Gaza Strip’s Hamas rulers as long as rocket fire continues from the Palestinian enclave.
Israel’s operation has drawn Western support for what US and European leaders have called Israel’s right to self-defence, but there have also been a growing number of calls from world leaders to seek an end to the violence.On Sunday, British Foreign Secretary William Hague warned that a ground invasion of the Gaza Strip “would lose Israel a lot of the international support and sympathy that they have in this situation.”

Hague told Sky News television it was much more difficult to limit civilian casualties in a ground assault and said it would threaten to prolong the conflict.

Air and sea raids continue

Fifty Palestinians, about half of them civilians, including 14 children, have been killed since the Israeli offensive began, Palestinian officials said. More than 500 rockets fired from Gaza have hit Israel, killing three civilians.

Since Israel unleashed its massive air campaign on Wednesday, the Jewish state has launched more than 950 air strikes on the coastal Palestinian territory, targeting weaponry and flattening militant homes and headquarters.
The raids continued past midnight on Sunday, with warships bombarding targets from the sea. An air raid targeted a building in Gaza City housing the offices of local Arab media, wounding three journalists from al Quds television, a station Israel sees as pro-Hamas, witnesses said.
The TV building also housed journalists from Britain’s ITN news and Sky News networks.
Three other attacks killed three children and wounded 14 other people, medical officials said.
Violence ‘shatters’ hopes of peace
The night of violence represents a blow to peace efforts, which have been lead by Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi, who on Saturday said there were indications a truce could “soon” be reached.
FRANCE 24’s correspondent Gallagher Fenwick, reporting from Gaza, witnessed the latest night of violence.
“Throughout the night we heard very heavy shelling, most of it coming from Israeli warships stationed off the coast. The sound of Apache helicopters and drones flying low overhead could also be heard,” Fenwick said on Sunday.
“The Israeli Air Force has published a statement saying it had hit what it called ‘terrorist targets’ across the Gaza Strip, including rocket-launching facilities and other Hamas infrastructure. For their part, the Palestinian factions are claiming responsibility for rockets being fired towards Israel,” said Fenwick.
“It has really shattered the hopes that were raised on Saturday night when rumours came out of Cairo that a truce might be brokered between the two sides,” he continued. “Considering the night we have just had, it appears we are heading in the opposite direction.”
On Sunday, France also became involved in attempts to bring peace to the region with Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius travelling to Israel to try and broker a ceasefire between Hamas and Israel.
During his one-day visit Fabius is due to meet with Israeli leaders as well as with the President of the Palestinian Authority Mahmoud Abbas, diplomatic sources told AFP.
Egypt’s foreign ministry said that UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon will head to Cairo on Monday for talks with the president and other officials on the crisis in Gaza.
Israeli President Shimon Peres said in an interview with Britain’s Sky News on Sunday he welcomed efforts by his Egyptian counterpart to secure a ceasefire in the Gaza conflict but accused Hamas of rejecting the proposals.
A delegation of ministers from the Arab League are due to visit the Gaza Strip on Tuesday in what a league official described as a “show of support for the territory”.
Israel said it would keep schools in its southern region shut on Sunday as a precaution to avoid casualties from rockets.
On Saturday, in the Israeli Mediterranean port of Ashdod, a rocket ripped into several balconies. Police said five people were hurt.

Are We Ready For The Next Middle East War?

 

Now as He sat on the Mount of Olives, the disciples came to Him privately, saying, “Tell us, when will these things be? And what will be the sign of Your coming, and of the end of the age?” And Jesus answered and said to them: “Take heed that no one deceives you.  For many will come in My name, saying, ‘I am the Christ,’ and will deceive many.  And you will hear of wars and rumors of wars. See that you are not troubled; for all these things must come to pass, but the end is not yet.  For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. And there will be famines, pestilences,  and earthquakes in various places.  All these are the beginning of sorrows.

Matthew 24: 3-8

As the Middle East match box gets hotter, the prophesies we read from Jesus in Matthew 24 are being fulfilled before our eyes. The enemies of Israel are planning for the destruction of the Jewish people and her allies. Various nations of the world are rising up against each other and peace is elusive as ever.

The U.S. has seen it’s share of drought, pestilences, crop failures, and natural disasters which put us in a position of wondering if we are prepared for the next disaster which may befall us. Are we also ready for higher gasoline and food prices should the Middle East erupt in war?

Now is the time to prepare for any disaster which might befall you by stocking up with food, water, and other items to get you through the next disaster

P.S. Receiving salvation and having a personal relationship with Jesus Christ is the best thing that could happen to you now and in the time of disaster.

For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.  For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved.

John 3: 16-17

Prepare Today For What Might Happen Tomorrow!