Radiation contaminated more than 20,000 square miles and 43 million people in Japan: EU report

(NaturalNews) In the three months following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, which occurred back in March 2011, a land area larger than 20,000 square miles (mi2) became contaminated with high levels of radionuclides of both cesium and iodine, says a new European Commission report. Using the most realistic estimates in a mathematical model, scientists determined that as many as 43 million Japanese people, and perhaps even more, were exposed during that time to high levels of the two contaminants, which are still being spewed from the shuttered plant to this very day.

As explained in a Science for Environment Policy News Alert, the study calculated the atmospheric deposition of the two radionuclides using a widely respected circulation model and focused specifically on emissions in gaseous form. The study also took into account factors that might affect radionuclide concentrations upon dispersion, including precipitation, wind patterns, particle sedimentation and radioactive decay.

After crunching the numbers using relatively conservative estimates, the research team postulated that a land area measuring 34,000 square kilometers (km2), or about 13,000 mi2, was effectively contaminated with more than 40 kilobecquerels per square meter of the two radioactive substances. This level is considered by the International Atomic Energy Agency to be the threshold for what is considered to be “contamination.”

Based on this assessment, nearly 10 million people living within this land area were also affected by the radiation, including many people living in Tokyo, the nation’s capital. While the bulk of radioactive cesium, some 80 percent, was blown eastward over the Pacific Ocean following the disaster, most of the radioactive iodine released was deposited locally in Japan due to its physical properties and the way that it is carried by the wind.

“The study estimates that the land area affected by radioactivity from both types of radionuclides above this threshold is approximately 34,000 km2 of Japan, inhabited by around 9.4 million people,” reads the News Alert.

Evaluation only looked at cesium and iodine; many other radioactive particles emitted from Fukushima

But these estimates are very likely understated, as separate calculations suggest that radioactive emissions were likely five times higher, at least, than the emission estimates used for the study. Based on these more realistic figures, the contamination range was likely far higher, measuring some 56,000 km2 (ca. 21,000 mi2) and affecting around 43 million Japanese people.

And this estimate only accounts for radioactive cesium and iodine, just two of the many radioactive particles emitted from Fukushima. Since measurement tools for radioactive strontium and other isotopes are not in use or do not exist, the full extent of Fukushima radiation cannot be fully ascertained, which means it can only be assumed that radiation levels were far higher than even this groundbreaking study suggests.

“A separate calculation which assumed source emissions that were five times greater, suggested that a relatively large and densely populated part of Japan – 56,000 square kilometers – would be classified as contaminated,” adds the study announcement. “This highlights the uncertainty that is integral to both measuring and modelling emissions (particularly for iodine radionuclides) and the need for more accurate estimates of the emissions.”

You can view the full study as it was published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics here:
http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net.

You can also view an earlier study published in the same journal by the same authors, revealing similar findings, here:
http://www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net.

Sources for this article include:

http://enenews.com

http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net

http://www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net

http://ec.europa.eu

http://science.naturalnews.com

Click to http://www.naturalnews.com/044055_radiation_contamination_Japan.html

TeshuvahRoad

Dead Sea Life Covers 98% of Ocean Floor After Fukushima

Sea life in the Pacific Ocean is dying off at an alarming rate, and the peak of all this death and destruction coincides with a certain nuclear disaster that ironically occurred on the Pacific coast of Japan. Still, scientists analyzing what’s referred to as “sea snot” point their finger at global warming, refusing to even mention the radiation from Fukushima. Normally, this snot covers about 1% of the floor. Now, it seems to be covering about 98% of it.

According to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, life at the sea floor 145 miles out from the California coast has been analyzed for a total of 24 years now. There, the researchers measure the amount of ‘sea snot’ on the ocean floor. Sea snot is the highly technical term they use to describe dead sea life including fish, plankton, feces, and other organic oceanic matter. As mentioned, this snot covers about 1% of the floor, but now it seems to be covering about 98% of it.

“In the 24 years of this study, the past two years have been the biggest amounts of this detritus by far,” said marine biologist Christine Huffard, who works at the research station off of California. Multiple other stations throughout the Pacific have seen similarly alarming increases.

Throughout the study and the National Geographic coverage of it, climate change is blamed. Never mind the fact that the astronomical increase in sea snot occurred in conjunction with the Fukushima nuclear disaster—they don’t even bother to mention that.

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster occurred when an earthquake and subsequent tsunami hit the area on March 11, 2011. To this day, the amount of damage is unclear as the Japanese government along with TEPCO (the power company that owns the nuclear power plant) seem to be content to hide the truth.

Measurements taken in March 2012 show sea snot levels to be at about 1%. Just a few months later, they had grown to 98%.

After 24 years of measuring the dead sea life and recognizing that global warming is a slow-moving and ongoing effect, the scientists would have us believe the “explosion” of sea snot that occurred in just a few months’ time was a normal effect of climate change. Yeah, right.

The sheer fact that the effects of Fukushima were not even considered make the study and its findings all the more suspicious. One would think if climate change could dramatically change the volume of sea snot in a few short months, it would have had other similarly troubling effects on other aspects of the environment during the same period—effects we would notice. But it didn’t. Fukushima did.

Click to http://naturalsociety.com/dead-sea-creatures-98-percent-ocean-floor/?utm_source=Natural+Society&utm_campaign=bfbfc1de78-Email+360%3A+1%2F28%2F2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f20e6f9c84-bfbfc1de78-323146273

Nuclear expert admits Fukushima reactors melted into the ground, contaminating hundreds of tons of groundwater daily

(NaturalNews) Fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster from two and a half years ago continues to silently impact health and safety around the world. After explosions in four of the six reactors, three melted down into the ground, and there is no way to simply plug the dam.

The effects of this unprecedented disaster continue to play out in slow motion. But of course, what isn’t seen remains little talked about in the media or among the public.

Recent accounts reveal that Japanese officials continue to refuse to publicly acknowledge the extent of the problem and are actively covering up the truth to hold together the appearance that everything is normal, and that all is well.

According to Takashi Hirose, author of Fukushima Meltdown: The World’s First Earthquake-Tsunami-Nuclear Disaster, there are reports of widespread contamination levels in food, including fish and vegetables, that is being distributed to Tokyo and other areas of Japan. Hirose asserts that there are credible claims that food originating in the Fukushima prefecture is shipped to other locales, then reshipped out with labels stating that it originated from other prefectures – masking its origins and hiding the threat of bioaccumulated radiation in the food web.

Meanwhile, a nuclear expert spotlighted the volume of radioactive materials – on the order of 300 tons of water per day – that continues to flow out from the melted down reactor cores at the power plant into the Pacific Ocean day in and day out, with no hope of slowing down, continually increasing global exposure since 2011.

The president and co-founder of the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility, Gordon Edwards, discussed the extent of the continued contamination during a radio interview with The Green Majorityon 89.5 FM in Toronto on December 6, 2013. Edwards holds a Ph.D. in mathematics and has served as a nuclear consultant and testified as a nuclear expert in Canadian courts.

Shockingly, Edwards stated, “There are about 300 tons of contaminated water every day going into the Pacific Ocean underground. That’s because the cores of the reactors have melted into the ground, and now the groundwater is flowing underneath the reactors and it’s washing that radioactive material out into the Pacific Ocean at the rate of 300 tons per day.”

The water pumped in to cool the melted reactor cores then becomes contaminated, pumped out again and washed out into the ocean in volume.

“They have been pumping 400 tons of water from the surface down into the reactor cores and then pumping the contaminated water back up again,” Edwards added.

Back in October, officials from TEPCO, the primarily government-owned Tokyo Electric Power Company, were mocked as “silly” for claiming that the irradiated groundwater flowing into the Pacific Ocean remained within a 0.12 square mile radius (0.3 square kilometers), asserting that the contamination was easily contained within a bay immediately in front of the reactor site. Nevertheless, that statement was supported by the Japanese government, according to Bloomberg News.

“These statements like a 0.3 square-kilometer zone are silly. It’s not true to the science,” said Ken Buesseler, a senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution who began his career studying how radioactive nucleotides from Chernobyl dispersed through the Black Sea.

“The credibility problem is as great as the engineering solution. There’s a lack of trust that they keep reinforcing by saying things like ‘beyond this 0.3 kilometers zone there’s no release,'” Buesseler added, drawing from data that his own team took off the coast of Fukushima.

While measurements for radioactivity are being taken near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors for cesium levels, very little testing is being done for tritium or strontium-90, which Buesseler indicated could be troublesome, as strontium mimics calcium and stores for long periods in bones, creating exposure routes in food sources including fish.

In an attempt to control what many have dubbed the greatest nuclear disaster in history, TEPCO has built over a thousand tanks, and growing, to house the contaminated water. According to Gordon Edwards, these holding tanks, already leaking, are larger disasters waiting to happen – should a new storm or other weather event happen, for instance.

“All that contaminated water is just sitting there,” Edwards said. “They found a pool of water beside the tank that was leaking, that pool of water – they measured the radiation levels – if a person stood beside that pool of water for 1 hour, they would die of radiation poisoning. So that’s how contaminated this water is.”

A fresh report from RT highlighted many of the makeshift solutions being used in vain to try to contain the vast amounts of contaminated water. It quoted fallout researcher Christina Consolo, of RadChick Radiation Research & Mitigation, who said, “The site has been propped up with duct tape and a kick-stand for over two years. Many of their ‘fixes’ are only temporary.”

At least 71 U.S. sailors who responded to Fukushima aboard the U.S.S. Ronald Reagan have reportedly developed leukemia, thyroid cancer and brain tumors, and are in the process of filing a lawsuit against TEPCO for allegedly downplaying the dangers of nuclear radiation near the Daiichi plant.

Sources for this article include:

http://enenews.com

http://www.counterpunch.org

http://www.bloomberg.com

http://rt.com

http://ecowatch.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Click to http://www.naturalnews.com/043464_Fukushima_nuclear_reactors_groundwater_contamination.html