Atomic Balm Part 1: Prime Minister Abe Uses The Tokyo Olympics As Snake Oil Cure For The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Meltdowns

By Arnie Gundersen
Edited by Maggie Gundersen

As we prepare for the eighth remembrance of the March 11, 2011 earthquake, tsunami and triple meltdowns at Fukushima Daiichi, Fairewinds is ever mindful of what is currently happening in Japan.

There has never been a roadmap for Japan to extricate itself from the radioactive multi-headed serpentine Hydra curse that has been created in an underfunded, unsuccessful attempt to clean-up the ongoing spread of migrating radioactivity from Fukushima. Rather than focus its attention on mitigating the radioactive exposure to Japan’s civilians, the government of Japan has sought instead to redirect world attention to the 2020 Olympics scheduled to take place in Tokyo.

Truthfully, a situation as overwhelming as Fukushima can exist in every location in the world that uses nuclear power to produce electricity. The triple meltdowns at Fukushima Daiichi are the worst industrial catastrophe that humankind has ever created.

Prior to Fukushima, the atomic power industry never envisioned a disaster of this magnitude anywhere in the world. Worldwide, the proponents and operators of nuclear power plants still are not taking adequate steps to protect against disasters of the magnitude of Fukushima!

Parts of Japan are being permanently destroyed by the migrating radioactivity that has been ignored, not removed, and subsequent ocean and land contamination is expanding and destroying once pristine farmlands and villages. For reference in the US and other countries, Fukushima Prefecture is approximately the size of the State of Connecticut. Think about it, how would an entire State – its woods, rivers, and valleys, eradicate radioactive contamination?

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Let’s begin with the reactors and site itself. There was a triple meltdown in 2011, yet Tokyo Electric banned the use of the word “meltdown” in any of its communications with Japanese civilians. Now we know that in the first week after the tsunami, each molten radioactive core melted through its six-inch-thick steel reactor, burned and chemically reacted with the concrete underneath, and all are now lying in direct contact with groundwater. Aside from a few grainy pictures of those cores showing burn holes in the reactors, nothing has been done to remove the cores and to prevent further contamination of the groundwater. I have witnessed schemes including a mining operation to bore under the reactors and an underground train to collect the molten masses, but those schemes are decades from fruition. The government of Japan claims that the Fukushima site will be entirely cleaned and decommissioned in less than forty years, a date that will definitely slip AFTER the 2020 Tokyo Olympics are held, and one that is scientifically impossible since some radioactive isotopes will be spread across the Fukushima site and surrounding landscape for 300 years and others for 250,000 years.

Fukushima’s radioactive reactor cores have been in direct contact with groundwater for the last eight years, and then that highly toxic radioactive water enters the Pacific Ocean. When the disaster struck TEPCO wanted to build an ice-wall to prevent the spread of the contamination, which I knew would fail. I advocated immediately surrounding the reactors with a trench filled with zeolite, a chemical used to absorb radiation at other atomic facilities.

“The problem with freezing the soil is that as soon as you get an earthquake, you lose power and then your ice turns to mush and you’re stuck.” Gundersen, who has visited the Fukushima power plant in the past, said a better solution would be to dig a two-meter wide trench down to bedrock level and fill it with a material called zeolite: a volcanic material that comes from Mother Nature.

“It’s incredibly good at filtering radioactive isotopes. So whatever is inside the fence will stay inside and whatever is outside the fence would be clean,” said Gundersen, who estimates the price tag for such a project would be around $10 billion.

TEPCO’s ice wall has not eliminated radiation from spreading via groundwater. How will Fukushima’s owner TEPCO and the government of Japan successfully clean and mitigate the damage caused by the three atomic reactors that each lost their fuel to a meltdown? These problems were never anticipated in Japan where these reactors were built and operated or in the United States where the Fukushima nuclear plants were engineered and designed and the parts were manufactured.

Since the meltdowns in 2011, Fairewinds notified the world that the recovery plans for the proposed cleanup would be almost untenable, calling it a ‘long slog’. From the very beginning, I made it clear that “the nuclear disaster is underfunded and lacks transparency, causing the public to remain in the dark.” Sadly, eight years later, nothing has changed.

In February 2012 when I spoke to the press at the Tokyo Foreign Correspondents Press Club, the governments recovery from the radiation released by Fukushima has never been about protecting the people of Japan. It was clear in the immediate aftermath of the world’s largest atomic power disaster and still today, the government of Japan is focused on protecting the financial interests of the nuclear power corporations in Japan so they may build new reactors as well as continue to operate the old ones. Clearly, the steps taken by the government of Japan shows that the survival of the electric generating corporations like Hitachi, Toshiba, Tokyo Electric and others are more important to the Abe Government that the survival of 160,000 evacuees and the future of the food supply emanating from Japan’s agriculture and aquaculture.

Evacuees in Japan are being forced to move back to their community and their homes that remain radioactively contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi detonations and meltdowns. The government of Japan and the alleged global regulator, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) – which was chartered by the United Nations (UN) to both promote and regulate atomic power generation – have raised the allowable public radiation level more than 20-times what it originally was rather than return to land to the condition it once was.

An exposé released in early February 2019 in The Washington Post said that,

For six years, Namie was deemed unsafe after a multiple-reactor meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant following a 2011 earthquake and tsunami. In March 2017, the government lifted its evacuation order for the center of Namie. But hardly anyone has ventured back. Its people are scattered and divided. Families are split. The sense of community is coming apart…

As we at Fairewinds Energy Education have repeatedly said since the tragic 2011 meltdowns, understanding why the fate of the 160,000 evacuees from the toxic Fukushima landscape does not matter to the government of Japan, one must simply follow the money trail back to the corporations producing Japan’s electricity. As Fairewinds has noted from its personal experience, and what The Washington Post and the people of Japan clearly understand is that these meltdown refugees are simply pawns in a much bigger issue of money and politics. According to The Washington Post article,

For the people of Namie and other towns near the Fukushima plant, the pain is sharpened by the way the Japanese government is trying to move beyond the tragedy, to use the 2020 Tokyo Olympics as a symbol of hope and recovery, a sign that life can return to normal after a disaster of this magnitude…. Its charm offensive is also tied up with efforts to restart the country’s nuclear-power industry, one of the world’s most extensive networks of atomic power generation. [Emphasis Added].

Six Olympic softball games and a baseball game will be staged in Fukushima, the prefecture’s bustling and radiation-free capital city, and the Olympic torch relay will start from here.

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To determine whether or not Olympic athletes might be affected by fallout emanating from the disaster site, Dr. Marco Kaltofen and I were sponsored by Fairewinds Energy Education to look at Olympic venues during the fall of 2017. We took simple dirt and dust samples along the Olympic torch route as well as inside Fukushima’s Olympic stadium and as far away as Tokyo. When the Olympic torch route and Olympic stadium samples were tested, we found samples of dirt in Fukushima’s Olympic Baseball Stadium that were highly radioactive, registering 6,000 Bq/kg of Cesium, which is 3,000 times more radioactive than dirt in the US. We also found that simple parking lot radiation levels were 50-times higher there than here in the US.

Thirty of the dirt and fine dust samples that I took on my last two trips to Japan in February and March 2016 and September 2017 were analyzed at WPI (Worchester Polytechnic Institute. The WPI laboratory analysis are detailed in the report entitled: Measuring Radioactivity in Soil and Dust Samples from Japan, T. Pham, S. Franca and S. Nguyen, Worchester Polytechnic Institute, which found that:

With the upcoming XXXII Olympiad in 2020 hosted by Japan, it is necessary to look into the radioactivity of Olympic venues as well as tourist attractions in the host cities… Since thousands of athletes and millions of visitors are travelling to Japan for the Olympics, there has been widespread concern from the international community about radiation exposure. Therefore, it is important to investigate the extent of radioactive fallout from the Fukushima Dai-ichi incident…

The measured results showed a much higher activity of Cesium-137 in the proposed torch route compared to other areas. Overall, the further away from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, the lower the radioactivity. The activity of Cesium-137 in Tokyo, the furthest site from the plant, was the lowest when compared to the other sites. Therefore, the activity of Cesium-137 in Tokyo sample was used as the baseline to qualitatively estimate the human exposure to radiation.

.… At the Azuma Sports Park, the soil and dust samples yielded a range of 78.1 Bq/kg to 6176.0 Bq/kg. This particular Olympic venue is around 90 km from the Nuclear Power Plant. The other sites that are closer to the Nuclear Power Plant like the tourist route, proposed torch route, and non-Olympic samples have higher amounts due to the close proximity to ground zero of the disaster.

… the proposed torch route samples had the highest mean radioactivity due to their close proximity to the plant. Based on the measurement, we estimated qualitatively that the radiation exposure of people living near the Azuma Sports Park area was 20.7 times higher than that of people living in Tokyo. The main tourist and proposed torch routes had radiation exposure of 24.6 and 60.6 times higher, respectively, than in Tokyo…. Olympic officials should consider using the results of this project to decide whether the radioactivity level at the proposed torch route and the Olympic venues are within acceptable level.

On a more personal note, I witnessed first-hand the ongoing radioactive devastation in and around the Namie area like that detailed in The Washington Post’s revealing and factual essay. During the two weeks I spent in and around Namie in September 2017 I took six short videos showing what the devastation looks and feels like up close. These short iPhone videos total less than 5-minutes of run time. I was on my own, without a videographer, so these short films probably lack the professional quality viewers may usually associate with Fairewinds, however, they do convey the very palpable feeling of gloom and emptiness pervading the ghost towns I visited. I am sharing the first three short videos in today’s blog. We will be releasing a Part 2 of this Fukushima update, which will feature another three short films.

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Longtime Friends of Fairewinds may remember that back in 2011, Prime Minister Noda (he was between the ousted Prime Minister Naoto Kan, who was PM when the Fukushima Meltdowns occurred and today’s Prime Minister Abe), claimed that the three melted down Fukushima reactors were in ‘cold shutdown’, which they were not, in order to lay the groundwork for Japan’s Olympic bid. Noda claimed “… we can consider the accident contained”. Fairewinds compared Noda’s “cold shutdown” hypocrisy to former President George Bush crowing about “Mission Accomplished” in Iraq. Sadly, what we said in 2011 still rings true today:

Is the Japanese government and the IAEA protecting the nuclear industry and not the people of Japan by claiming that Fukushima is stable when it is not? Fairewinds’ chief engineer Arnie Gundersen outlines major inconsistencies and double-speak by the IAEA, Japanese Government, and TEPCO claiming that the Fukushima accident is over. Dynamic versus static equilibrium, escalated dose exposures to the Japanese children and nuclear workers, and the blending of radioactive materials with non-contaminated material and spreading this contaminated ash throughout Japan are only a small part of this ongoing nuclear tragedy.

Later in 2013, Japan pressed the International Olympic Committee and bribed some of its members to accept the Olympics in 2020 according to an Associated Press article February 18, 2019 by Journalist Haruka Nuga.

Members of the JOC executive board are up for re-election this summer. There is speculation Takeda…[ Japanese Olympic Committee President Tsunekazu Takeda, who is being investigated for his part in an alleged bribery scandal] will not run, or could be replaced. French investigators believe he may have helped Tokyo win the 2020 Olympics in a vote by the International Olympic Committee.

Takeda has been JOC president since 2001. He is also a powerful IOC member and the head of its marketing commission. He has not stepped aside from either position while the IOC’s ethics committee investigates.

…French authorities suspect that about $2 million paid by the Tokyo bid committee — headed by Takeda — to a Singapore consulting company, Black Tidings, found its way to some IOC members in 2013 when Tokyo won the vote over bids from Istanbul and Madrid… Takeda last month acknowledged he signed off on the payments but denied corruption allegations. An internal report in 2016 by the Japanese Olympic Committee essentially cleared Takeda of wrongdoing.

Tokyo is spending at least $20 billion to organize the Olympics. Games costs are difficult to track, but the city of Tokyo appears to be picking up at least half the bill.

Much of Japan’s focus has been to show that the Fukushima area is safe and has recovered from a 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and the meltdowns at three nuclear reactors. [Emphasis Added]

Here is what I said in a video on Fairewinds website in 2013, when the original Tokyo Olympic announcement was made.

I think hosting the Olympics in 2020 is an attempt by the Japanese to change the topic. I don’t think people around the world are going to care until 2020 approaches. There is a seven-year window for the Japanese government to work to make Tokyo a showcase for the entire world to view. I think the Japanese government wanted to host the Olympics to improve the morale of the people of Japan after the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Unfortunately, it’s taking people’s attention off of the true cost of the accident, in terms of both money and public health.

Placing the Olympics in Tokyo was and still is a ploy to minimize the consequences of the Fukushima Daiichi meltdowns and to take the public’s attention away from a pressing emergency that still needs resolution for the health and safety of the people of Japan. (Click to Source)

Fairewinds Energy Education will keep you informed with Part 2, at fairewinds.org.

Eight years after triple nuclear meltdown, Fukushima No. 1’s water woes show no signs of ebbing

BY RYUSEI TAKAHASHI

STAFF WRITER

MAR 7, 2019

Nearly a thousand storage tanks are scattered across the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, holding a staggering 1.1 million tons of treated water used to keep its melted reactor cores cool while they rust in the sun.

Plant manager Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings Inc., or Tepco, plans to build more of the gigantic tanks to hold another 0.27 million tons, which is roughly the equivalent of 108 Olympic-size swimming pools. The new tanks are expected reach full capacity in four or five years.

Each tank takes seven to 10 days to fill and holds between 1,000 to 1,200 tons of liquid, Tepco officials told reporters during a tour in February organized by the Japan National Press Club. It’s been eight years since Fukushima No. 1 suffered three core meltdowns triggered by tsunami following the Great East Japan Earthquake, but the situation with the tanks may be a sign Tepco has yet to get the facility under control.

“Space isn’t a big issue at this point in time, but five or 10 years from now, after we’ve started removing the melted fuel debris, we’re going to need facilities to store and preserve it,” Akira Ono, president of Fukushima No. 1 Decontamination and Decommissioning Engineering Co., a Tepco unit overseeing the decommissioning process, said at a news conference in January.

The water issue is eating up both space and resources, but a solution is unlikely to emerge anytime soon.

Nearly 1,000 water tanks are scattered across the grounds of the Fukushima No. 1 power plant. Some are over 10 meters tall, hold 1,000 to 1,200 tons and take seven to 10 days to fill.
Nearly 1,000 water tanks are scattered across the grounds of the Fukushima No. 1 power plant. Some are over 10 meters tall, hold 1,000 to 1,200 tons and take seven to 10 days to fill. | POOL / VIA TOKYO PRESS PHOTOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION

The International Atomic Energy Agency published a report in November that said the physical constraints of the site “leave little room for additional tanks” beyond what Tepco has allocated.

The IAEA report went on to say it believes storing tainted water in “above ground tanks . . . can only be a temporary measure while a more sustainable solution is needed” and a “decision on the disposition path should be taken urgently.”

Beyond 2020, Tepco has not allocated any additional space for holding treated water on the site and has no plans to do so at this time. The utility said the tanks will likely become a headache if they remain at the plant.

“At that point, we may need to rethink how we’re using the space,” Ono said.

Eight years ago when the monstrous tsunami hit, the entire plant lost power and reactors 1, 2 and 3 lost coolant, causing their cores to overheat. The fuel rods consequently melted, dripping molten fuel that burned through their pressure vessels and pooled in their primary containment vessels. Reactors 1, 3 and 4 then suffered hydrogen explosions.

Reporters look up at the pressure vessel from inside the primary containment vessel of a reactor at the Fukushima No. 2 power plant on Feb. 6. At the sister plant of Fukushima No. 1, which suffered three reactor core meltdowns in March 2011, molten fuel burned through the pressure vessels and dropped down into the PCVs.
Reporters look up at the pressure vessel from inside the primary containment vessel of a reactor at the Fukushima No. 2 power plant on Feb. 6. At the sister plant of Fukushima No. 1, which suffered three reactor core meltdowns in March 2011, molten fuel burned through the pressure vessels and dropped down into the PCVs. | POOL / VIA TOKYO PRESS PHOTOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION

Tepco must inject water into the reactors indefinitely to keep the melted cores cool, but water tainted by contact with the fuel and associated debris has been leaking from the damaged containment vessels and into the basements of the reactor buildings, where tons of fresh groundwater flows in daily through holes in their damaged walls.

The contaminated water is pumped out and passed through a filtration device called the Advanced Liquid Processing System — which is supposed to remove every radionuclide except for tritium — and stored in the tanks.

Tepco has taken steps to limit the amount of groundwater seeping into the reactor buildings, including wells to intercept and divert it and an underground ice wall around the buildings to block any inflow.

According to Tepco, however, about 83 tons of water are seeping into the reactor buildings each day. Although this is an improvement from some 300 tons in previous years, Tepco must keep making more tanks.

At the moment, Tepco is waiting for a government panel’s advice on what to do with the tritium-tainted water. The panel is considering five disposal methods: ground injection, sea discharge after diluting the tritium concentration, discharging it as steam, discharging it as hydrogen, and solidification followed by underground burial.

Tritium is a radioactive form of hydrogen that forms naturally and is a common byproduct of nuclear reactors. In large quantities, exposure can be dangerous, especially if ingested or inhaled. Processed adequately, however, tritium is believed to pose little to no health risk. For instance, tritium is present in regular tap water, but no ill effects have been confirmed, according to the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry.

Discharging treated tritium water into the ocean is a common practice at nuclear power plants around the world.

Thus some experts, including Toyoshi Fuketa, who heads the Nuclear Regulation Authority, think this is the best option for Fukushima.

“Prolonging the storage of water in those tanks will make decommissioning the power plant that much more difficult for Tepco. Limited resources are being used to use these tanks as storage, not just money but other resources as well,” Fuketa said at a news conference in September.

“The longer we store the water, the greater the influence it will have on the decommissioning of the Fukushima No. 1 power plant.”

But there are concerns about the impact an ocean discharge may have on fisheries still trying to recover from the nuclear crisis.

Fishing in the area has resumed on a trial basis and workers still perform radiation checks before shipping their hauls to fish markets. The waters off Fukushima Prefecture are at the confluence of two ocean currents — the Oyashio from the north and Kuroshio from the south — which make for the good fishing grounds that have been a vital part of the agrarian prefecture’s economy.

Eight years after the meltdowns, however, residents are still struggling to convince the world that fish from the area are safe to eat. Many believe public perception alone will cripple Fukushima’s fishing industry anew if the tainted water is expelled into the ocean — even if the tritium has been reduced to below international standards.

A Tepco worker points a dosimeter at the walls of reactor 3 at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant on Feb. 5.
A Tepco worker points a dosimeter at the walls of reactor 3 at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant on Feb. 5. | POOL / VIA TOKYO PRESS PHOTOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION

Trust issues continue to plague Tepco after it claimed ALPS was filtering every radionuclide from the cooling water except tritium. Last August it came to light that the allegedly treated water still contained other dangerous contaminants, including iodine, cesium and strontium. Some of the concentrations were above current safety limits.

This has further angered Fukushima residents and made it harder to get their approval for dumping the water held by the tanks into the sea.

During a public hearing hosted by METI in August, participants urged the government and Tepco to consider finding an off-site location to store the water instead of discharging it into the ocean.

“Without a national debate and without the understanding of Japanese citizens or the countries importing our products, as a fisherman of Fukushima Prefecture, I strongly oppose the plan to discharge the treated water into the ocean,” Tetsu Nozaki, chairman of the Fukushima Prefectural Federation of Fisheries Cooperative Association, told the hearing.

“To release the ALPS-treated water into the ocean, at this time, would deal a disastrous blow to the fishermen of Fukushima and rob them of their hard work and motivation,” he said.

Thierry Charles, deputy director-general in charge of nuclear safety at the Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Institute in France, admitted it is a difficult problem to address, given the volume of water concerned and the tritium content.

Charles believes a controlled release into the ocean would be viable “under conditions to be defined.”

“In this respect, the societal acceptance of this solution should be based on the broad involvement of all stakeholders at the various stages of the process, by explaining the different options studied,” he told The Japan Times.

Meanwhile, the crippled plant faces other serious challenges — including how to extract the molten fuel.

“How we remove the melted fuel debris from the reactors. That’s the most important point. . . . The water tanks are not a big problem,” said Hiroshi Miyano, a professor at Hosei University’s Graduate School of Engineering and Design and chair of the decommissioning committee of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan.

Reporters visit the site where soil contaminated by radiation from the three core meltdowns at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant is sorted and distributed to a storage facility, on Feb. 7.
Reporters visit the site where soil contaminated by radiation from the three core meltdowns at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant is sorted and distributed to a storage facility, on Feb. 7. | RYUSEI TAKAHASHI

In February, Tepco inserted a remote-controlled probe into reactor 2 to make contact with material inside the containment vessel believed to be melted fuel. The machine — equipped with a camera, thermometer and dosimeter — was designed to poke and gently lift sediment to test its physical properties.

This was the first time a machine had touched melted fuel debris inside any of the crippled reactors at Fukushima No. 1.

The removal process at the plant is slated to begin in 2021. Before that part begins, though, research from the site will be used to make various remote-controlled probes capable of navigating the unique scenarios in each unit. Reactor 3, for example, remains largely submerged and requires an aquatic probe.

Miyano said Tepco and the government — with the help of scientists, nuclear physicists and engineers from around the world — are inventing new technologies as they devise a way to remove the debris.

He added that no country has ever attempted to use remote-controlled robots to remove melted fuel from the inside of a crippled nuclear reactor.

“This is the first time, so there will be many challenges.” (Click to Source)

 
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Death toll from massive earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia jumps to 1,203 as rescuers battle to save scores of people screaming from within the rubble

  • A 7.5 magnitude earthquake on Friday caused a massive tsunami to crash into Sulawesi island on Friday
  • The cities of Palu and Donggala were worse hit as beachgoers were swept away by the enormous waves
  • A government spokesman confirmed Sunday the death toll had risen to 1,203, doubling the last number
  • Access to several towns along the coastline has hampered relief efforts as transport networks are down
  • Criticism has been levelled at the government for initially lifting a tsunami warning after Friday’s quake

The death toll from an earthquake and tsunami that devastated part of the island of Sulawesi has risen to 1,203 – with the total number expected to climb higher still.

The tsunami, which was triggered after a magnitude-7.5 earthquake, ripped through the Pacific Ring of Fire and crashed into the Palu at 500mph, causing widespread destruction into the evening on Friday.

Figures collected by the National Police Headquarters put the number killed at 1,203 people. The death toll is expected to climb even higher. Search and rescue team have struggled to reach cut-off communities feared wiped out by the disaster.

Indonesian National Search and Rescue Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said access to Donggala, as well as the towns of Sigi and Boutong, is still limited and there are no comprehensive reports from those areas.

Government officials said rescuers could hear screams from within the rubble of several buildings on Saturday evening as they battled through the night and into Sunday to free those trapped.

Samidah, a relative of a victim, cries while gathered outside the collapsed Roa Roa hotel in Palu, Indonesia's Central Sulawesi

Samidah, a relative of a victim, cries while gathered outside the collapsed Roa Roa hotel in Palu, Indonesia’s Central Sulawesi

A woman cries as she waits to be evacuated by military aircraft following an earthquake and tsunami at Mutiara Sis Al Jufri Airport in Palu

A woman cries as she waits to be evacuated by military aircraft following an earthquake and tsunami at Mutiara Sis Al Jufri Airport in Palu

A man walks inside a damaged area at the Airport in the aftermath of earthquake in Palu in Indonesia today

A man walks inside a damaged area at the Airport in the aftermath of earthquake in Palu in Indonesia today

Rescue personnel evacuate earthquake survivor Ida, a food vendor, from the rubble of a collapsed restaurant in Palu

Rescue personnel evacuate earthquake survivor Ida, a food vendor, from the rubble of a collapsed restaurant in Palu

Relatives look for tsunami and earthquake victims in body bags at a police station, in the aftermath of earthquake in Palu

Relatives look for tsunami and earthquake victims in body bags at a police station, in the aftermath of earthquake in Palu

Rescuers try to rescue a 15-year old earthquake victim Nurul Istikharah from her damaged house following earthquakes and tsunami in Palu on Sunday

Rescuers try to rescue a 15-year old earthquake victim Nurul Istikharah from her damaged house following earthquakes and tsunami in Palu on Sunday

Rescue personnel evacuate earthquake survivor Ida, a food vendor, from the rubble of a collapsed restaurant in Palu

Rescue personnel evacuate earthquake survivor Ida, a food vendor, from the rubble of a collapsed restaurant in Palu

Earthquake victims stuck in a traffic jam gather as they leave Palu today

Earthquake victims stuck in a traffic jam gather as they leave Palu today

Rescue personnel carry the body of an earthquake victim to the compounds of a police hospital in Palu

Rescue personnel carry the body of an earthquake victim to the compounds of a police hospital in Palu

A team of rescuers helping to pull a trapped woman from the mud on Sunday as thousands more are still feared to be trapped under rubble from Friday's earthquake

A team of rescuers helping to pull a trapped woman from the mud on Sunday as thousands more are still feared to be trapped under rubble from Friday’s earthquake

Striking aerial shots show a mosque which has been razed first by the 7.5 magnitude earthquake and then the 2 meter high wave on Friday afternoon 

Striking aerial shots show a mosque which has been razed first by the 7.5 magnitude earthquake and then the 2 meter high wave on Friday afternoon

A road traffic bridge could be seen completely collapsed along the coastline in the outskirts of Palu as first the earthquake and then the tsunami swept away enormous pieces of the city's infrastructure

A handout photo made available by the Indonesian Presidential Palace showing Indonesian President Joko Widodo (C) looking at a ruined house as he visits a devastated area in Palu

A handout photo made available by the Indonesian Presidential Palace showing Indonesian President Joko Widodo (C) looking at a ruined house as he visits a devastated area in Palu

A handout photo made available by the Indonesian Presidential Palace showing Indonesian President Joko Widodo (2-L) talking to residents as he visits a devastated area in Palu

A handout photo made available by the Indonesian Presidential Palace showing Indonesian President Joko Widodo (2-L) talking to residents as he visits a devastated area in Palu

An injured man is evacuated on a military aircraft following an earthquake and tsunami at Mutiara Sis Al Jufri Airport in Palu

An injured man is evacuated on a military aircraft following an earthquake and tsunami at Mutiara Sis Al Jufri Airport in Palu

In this photo released by the Indonesian Presidential Office, Indonesian President Joko Widodo, left, talks with tsunami survivors in a temporary shelter

In this photo released by the Indonesian Presidential Office, Indonesian President Joko Widodo, left, talks with tsunami survivors in a temporary shelter

‘The death is believed to be still increasing since many bodies were still under the wreckage while many have not able to be reached,’ Nugroho said.

Fears are mounting for the the fishing town of Donggala, which was closer to the epicentre of the quake, but which rescuers have not been able to reach.

The town of Mamuju was also severely affected but currently impossible to access due to damaged roads and disrupted telecommunications.

Meanwhile criticisms have been levelled at the country’s geophysics agency for lifting the tsunami warning 34 minutes after it was first issued, which may have led to confusion and exacerbated the death toll.

Many of those killed in Palu were swept away by giant waves more than 10ft high as they played on the beach in the scenic tourist town. 

Indonesian President Joko Widodo (L) looking at a ruined house as he visits a devastated area in Palu

Indonesian President Joko Widodo (L) looking at a ruined house as he visits a devastated area in Palu

Earthquake victims stuck in a traffic jam gather as they leave Palu on September 30, 2018

Earthquake victims stuck in a traffic jam gather as they leave Palu on September 30, 2018

Earthquake victims stuck in a traffic jam gather as they leave Palu on September 30, 2018

Earthquake victims stuck in a traffic jam gather as they leave Palu on September 30, 2018

Relatives look for tsunami and earthquake victims in body bags at a police station in Palu today

Relatives look for tsunami and earthquake victims in body bags at a police station in Palu today

Indonesia quake: 832 people confirmed dead according to national agency
Indonesian National Search and Rescue Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said 832 people had died by Sunday afternoon but that figure later rose to 1,203

Indonesian National Search and Rescue Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said 832 people had died by Sunday afternoon but that figure later rose to 1,203

Rescuers carry an earthquake survivor at restaurant building damaged by the massive earthquake and tsunami in Palu on Sunday morning

Rescuers carry an earthquake survivor at restaurant building damaged by the massive earthquake and tsunami in Palu on Sunday morning

Indonesian rescuers search for the victims on the a collapsed Roa Roa hotel building in Palu as frantic efforts to save those trapped continued over the weekend

Indonesian rescuers search for the victims on the a collapsed Roa Roa hotel building in Palu as frantic efforts to save those trapped continued over the weekend

Members of the Indonesian National Search and Rescue Agency sift through the rubble of a collapsed building on Sunday in their desperate search for survivors

Members of the Indonesian National Search and Rescue Agency sift through the rubble of a collapsed building on Sunday in their desperate search for survivors

Motorists pass by a half-collapsed shopping mall heavily damaged by a massive earthquake and tsunami as darkness falls on Palu on Sunday

Motorists pass by a half-collapsed shopping mall heavily damaged by a massive earthquake and tsunami as darkness falls on Palu on Sunday

People carry items looted from a shopping mall badly damaged by a massive earthquake and tsunami in Palu on Sunday morning as water still fills the streets of the coastal city

People carry items looted from a shopping mall badly damaged by a massive earthquake and tsunami in Palu on Sunday morning as water still fills the streets of the coastal city

People take gasoline from a truck as the bare essentials are shipped in to the worst affected areas around the city of Palu on Sulawesi island

People take gasoline from a truck as the bare essentials are shipped in to the worst affected areas around the city of Palu on Sulawesi island

Hordes of people could be seen taking items from a damaged shopping mall in downtown Palu on Sunday as supply lines to the island remain down

Hordes of people could be seen taking items from a damaged shopping mall in downtown Palu on Sunday as supply lines to the island remain down

A mannequin lies on the ground amid the wreckage of a destroyed shopping mall in Palu on Sunday as the island struggles to cope with the effects of the devastating quake and tsunami

A mannequin lies on the ground amid the wreckage of a destroyed shopping mall in Palu on Sunday as the island struggles to cope with the effects of the devastating quake and tsunami

Looters take away items from a shopping mall as government agencies struggle to get fresh aid to the affected areas of coastline

Looters take away items from a shopping mall as government agencies struggle to get fresh aid to the affected areas of coastline

The number of casualties was no doubt increased by the fact that hundreds of people had descended on Palu’s beach for a festival to celebrate the city’s anniversary, due to start Friday night.

TV footage showed images of destroyed houses in Donggala and areas that were once land now inundated with water. Aerial video also showed the battered coastline surrounding Palu.

Looters were stealing from a badly damaged shopping centre in Palu that was not being guarded. They did not appear to be concerned about their safety, despite ongoing aftershocks and the structure’s questionable stability.

Residents were also seen returning to their destroyed homes, picking through waterlogged belongings, trying to salvage anything they could find.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo, second right, talks with tsunami survivors in Palu on Sunday as he flew into Sulawesi to oversee relief efforts

Indonesian President Joko Widodo, second right, talks with tsunami survivors in Palu on Sunday as he flew into Sulawesi to oversee relief efforts

President Joko Widodo stands in front of the ruins of a house in Palu on Sunday as he jetted in to inspect the damage for himself

President Joko Widodo stands in front of the ruins of a house in Palu on Sunday as he jetted in to inspect the damage for himself

Joko Widodo, left, talks with tsunami survivors in a temporary shelter in Palu as thousands have been left homeless by the disaster

Joko Widodo, left, talks with tsunami survivors in a temporary shelter in Palu as thousands have been left homeless by the disaster

People sifting through the rubble on Sunday after the earthquake razed several thousand of Palu's most vulnerable buildings to the ground on Friday

People sifting through the rubble on Sunday after the earthquake razed several thousand of Palu’s most vulnerable buildings to the ground on Friday

Thousands of people queue for gasoline in the streets of Palu following the disaster as many of the cars and motorbikes being used by civilians to adjust to the crisis have run out of fuel

Thousands of people queue for gasoline in the streets of Palu following the disaster as many of the cars and motorbikes being used by civilians to adjust to the crisis have run out of fuel

The damage outside a shopping mall in central Palu where dozens of motorbikes and cars have been submerged by the flooding from Friday's tsunami

The damage outside a shopping mall in central Palu where dozens of motorbikes and cars have been submerged by the flooding from Friday’s tsunami

Two men push a shopping trolley filled with goods away from the carcass of a destroyed shopping mall as people with motorbikes lined up in the streets to take away the looted goods on Sunday

Two men push a shopping trolley filled with goods away from the carcass of a destroyed shopping mall as people with motorbikes lined up in the streets to take away the looted goods on Sunday

Terrifying footage shows people fleeing in panic as giant tsunami wave smashes mosque in Indonesian coastal city

Horrific video footage uploaded to social media has revealed the extensive damage caused by a tsunami.

A dramatic video filmed from the top floor of a parking ramp spiral in Palu and posted on Twitter, showed a wall of whitewater crashing into houses along the shoreline, scattering shipping containers and almost flattening a large mosque.

People can be seen fleeing in panic as the tsunami devastates the surrounding area which, just moments before, had a car driving in it.

The impact of the disaster and the number of casualties is though to have been worsened by the fact that hundreds of people had descended on Palu’s beach for a festival to celebrate the city’s anniversary.

One clip even showed a baby being treated as the people grimly tried to deal with the aftermath of the disaster.

Another gives a view of the impact of the tsunami from the position of a fishing boat, with the fishermen heard praying as they take in the extent of the devastation.

It’s clear that thousands of buildings have been damaged, with some entirely swept away or demolished, leaving scores of families missing among the debris.

The survivors were to be evacuated to the Sulawesi city of Makassar in the island’s far south.

It’s the latest natural disaster to hit Indonesia, which is frequently struck by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis because of its location on the ‘Ring of Fire,’ an arc of volcanoes and fault lines in the Pacific Basin.

In December 2004, a massive magnitude 9.1 earthquake off Sumatra island in western Indonesia triggered a tsunami that killed 230,000 people in a dozen countries. Last month, a powerful quake on the island of Lombok killed 505 people.

Looters were stealing from the badly damaged shopping mall, which was not being guarded Sunday. They did not appear to be concerned about their safety, despite ongoing aftershocks and the structure’s questionable stability.

Residents were also seen returning to their destroyed homes, picking through waterlogged belongings, trying to salvage anything they could find.

A family sleeps in front of a restaurant in Palu on Sunday as thousands of people in the coastal city have been left homeless by the natural disaster

A family sleeps in front of a restaurant in Palu on Sunday as thousands of people in the coastal city have been left homeless by the natural disaster

People view the damage at the beach hit by tsunami as a road can be seen to be completely collapsed into the floodwater around the shore at Palu

People view the damage at the beach hit by tsunami as a road can be seen to be completely collapsed into the floodwater around the shore at Palu

Indonesian Air Force members stand in line as they prepare to board a military plane on its way to join emergency efforts in the coastal disaster area

Indonesian Air Force members stand in line as they prepare to board a military plane on its way to join emergency efforts in the coastal disaster area

Relief efforts are struggling to get through to most areas because of damage to airports, roads and rails with local rescuers in Sulawesi desperate for more support

Relief efforts are struggling to get through to most areas because of damage to airports, roads and rails with local rescuers in Sulawesi desperate for more support

Government officials said they expected the death toll to rise on Sunday despite it doubling to 832 over the weekend as more and more bodies are found in the rubble of destroyed buildings

Government officials said they expected the death toll to rise on Sunday despite it doubling to 832 over the weekend as more and more bodies are found in the rubble of destroyed buildings

Indonesian workers load donations into a military transport aircraft as those in affected areas are lacking the most basic necessities to survive

Indonesian workers load donations into a military transport aircraft as those in affected areas are lacking the most basic necessities to survive

A woman carries a meager ration of fuel away from a filling station after queuing for hours to get a supply in crisis-racked Palu, Indonesia on Sunday

A woman carries a meager ration of fuel away from a filling station after queuing for hours to get a supply in crisis-racked Palu, Indonesia on Sunday

The collapsed dome of a mosque in Palu which was brought down in the huge earthquake on Friday as some of the city's most notable landmarks fell victim to the tremors

The collapsed dome of a mosque in Palu which was brought down in the huge earthquake on Friday as some of the city’s most notable landmarks fell victim to the tremors

Residents make their way along a street full of debris, including the wreckage of a shipping container. Power lines have come down and in the background is a mosque which was a badly damaged by the 10ft waves 

Residents make their way along a street full of debris, including the wreckage of a shipping container. Power lines have come down and in the background is a mosque which was a badly damaged by the 10ft waves

Palu city is built around a narrow bay that apparently magnified the force of the tsunami waters as they raced into the tight inlet

Palu city is built around a narrow bay that apparently magnified the force of the tsunami waters as they raced into the tight inlet

Nugroho described the damage as 'extensive' with thousands of houses, hospitals, shopping malls and hotels collapsed, a bridge washed away and the main highway to Palu cut due to a landslide 

Nugroho described the damage as ‘extensive’ with thousands of houses, hospitals, shopping malls and hotels collapsed, a bridge washed away and the main highway to Palu cut due to a landslide

Some people climbed trees to escape the tsunami and survived the towering waves caused by the two earthquakes: the first, a 6.1 magnitude quake hit the densely populated region on Friday morning, and was quickly followed by even fiercer 7.5 magnitude tremors

Some people climbed trees to escape the tsunami and survived the towering waves caused by the two earthquakes: the first, a 6.1 magnitude quake hit the densely populated region on Friday morning, and was quickly followed by even fiercer 7.5 magnitude tremors

A woman cries as people begin to realise the extent of the damage and the number of casualties after an earthquake and a tsunami hit Palu. Thousands of buildings have been damaged, with some entirely swept away or demolished, leaving scores of families missing among the debris

A woman cries as people begin to realise the extent of the damage and the number of casualties after an earthquake and a tsunami hit Palu. Thousands of buildings have been damaged, with some entirely swept away or demolished, leaving scores of families missing among the debris

Many of those killed in Palu were swept away by giant waves more than 10ft high as they played on the beach in the scenic tourist town. The National Disaster Mitigation Agency warned early on of reports showing that 'victims died in the rubble of a collapsed building'

Many of those killed in Palu were swept away by giant waves more than 10ft high as they played on the beach in the scenic tourist town. The National Disaster Mitigation Agency warned early on of reports showing that ‘victims died in the rubble of a collapsed building’

Fears are mounting for the the fishing town of Donggala, which was closer to the epicentre of the quake, but which rescuers have not been able to reach. 

Fears are mounting for the the fishing town of Donggala, which was closer to the epicentre of the quake, but which rescuers have not been able to reach.

Indonesian media said Sunday that 832 people had died in Palu City, on the the Indonesian island of Sulawesi after two earthquakes in quick succession caused a tsunami that sent locals fleeing their homes.

Indonesian media said Sunday that 832 people had died in Palu City, on the the Indonesian island of Sulawesi after two earthquakes in quick succession caused a tsunami that sent locals fleeing their homes. (Click to Source)

Indonesia earthquake: Tsunami seen in terrifying footage crashing into island with huge wave

It comes after a major earthquake rocked central Sulawesi today, with terrified locals filmed screaming and running down streets

And as some were saying of the temple that it was decorated with handsome (shapely and magnificent) stones and consecrated offerings [a]”>[a]laid up to be kept], He said,

As for all this that you [thoughtfully] look at, the time will come when there shall not be left here one stone upon another that will not be thrown down.

And they asked Him, Teacher, when will this happen? And what sign will there be when this is about to occur?

And He said, Be on your guard and be careful that you are not led astray; for many will come in My name [b]”>[b]appropriating to themselves the name Messiah which belongs to Me], saying, I am He! and, The time is at hand! Do not go out after them.

And when you hear of wars and insurrections (disturbances, disorder, and confusion), do not become alarmed and panic-stricken and terrified; for all this must take place first, but the end will not [come] immediately.

10 Then He told them, Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom.

11 There will be mighty and violent earthquakes, and in various places famines and pestilences (plagues: c]”>[c]malignant and contagious or infectious epidemic diseases which are deadly and devastating); and there will be sights of terror and great signs from heaven.

12 But previous to all this, they will lay their hands on you and persecute you, turning you over to the synagogues and prisons, and you will be led away before kings and governors for My name’s sake.

13 This will be a time (an opportunity) for you to bear testimony.

14 Resolve and settle it in your minds not to meditate and prepare beforehand how you are to make your defense and how you will answer.

15 For I [Myself] will give you a mouth and such utterance and wisdom that all of your foes combined will be unable to stand against or refute.

16 You will be delivered up and betrayed even by parents and brothers and relatives and friends, and [some] of you they will put to death.

17 And you will be hated (despised) by everyone because [you bear] My name and for its sake.

18 But not a hair of your head shall perish.

19 By your steadfastness and patient endurance you d]”>[d]shall win the e]”>[e]true life of your souls.

20 But when you see Jerusalem surrounded by armies, then know and understand that its desolation has come near.

21 Then let those who are in Judea flee to the mountains, and let those who are inside [the city] get out of it, and let not those who are out in the country come into it;

22 For those are days of vengeance [of rendering full justice or satisfaction], that all things that are written may be fulfilled.

23 Alas for those who are pregnant and for those who have babies which they are nursing in those days! For great misery and anguish anddistress shall be upon the land and indignation and punishment andretribution upon this people.

24 They will fall by f]”>[f]the mouth and the edge of the sword and will be led away as captives to and among all nations; and Jerusalem will be trodden down by the Gentiles until the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled (completed).

25 And there will be signs in the sun and moon and stars; and upon the earth [there will be] distress (trouble and anguish) of nations in bewilderment and perplexity [g]”>[g]without resources, left wanting, embarrassed, in doubt, not knowing which way to turn] at the roaring (h]”>[h]the echo) of the tossing of the sea,

26 Men swooning away or expiring with fear and dread and apprehension and expectation of the things that are coming on the world; for the [very] powers of the heavens will be shaken and i]”>[i]caused to totter.

27 And then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with great (transcendent and overwhelming) power and [all His kingly] glory (majesty and splendor).

28 Now when these things begin to occur, look up and lift up your heads, because your redemption (deliverance) is drawing near.

29 And He told them a parable: Look at the fig tree and all the trees;

30 When they put forth their buds and come out in leaf, you see for yourselves and perceive and know that summer is already near.

31 Even so, when you see these things taking place, understand andknow that the kingdom of God is at hand.

32 Truly I tell you, this generation (j]”>[j]those living at that definite period of time) will not perish and pass away until all has taken place.

33 The k]”>[k]sky and the earth (l]”>[l]the universe, the world) will pass away, but My words will not pass away.

34 But take heed to yourselves and be on your guard, lest your hearts be overburdened and depressed (weighed down) with the m]”>[m]giddiness andheadache and n]”>[n]nausea of self-indulgence, drunkenness, and worldly worries and cares pertaining to [the o]”>[o]business of] this life, and [lest] that day come upon you suddenly like a trap or a noose;

35 For it will come upon all who live upon the face of the entire earth.

36 Keep awake then and watch at all times [be discreet, attentive, and ready], praying that you may have the full strength and ability and be accounted worthy to escape all these things [taken together] that will take place, and to stand in the presence of the Son of Man. (Luke 21:5-36Amplified Bible, Classic Edition (AMPC) Copyright © 1954, 1958, 1962, 1964, 1965, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation

 

Terrifying video footage shows massive waves crashing into an Indonesian island as a tsunami struck after a 7.5-magnitude earthquake.

In the shocking footage, recorded in Palu, Sulawesi, today, enormous waves can be seen surging forward amid terrified screams.

Officials had earlier withdrawn a tsunami warning.

Authorities say a communications blackout means it is impossible to confirm the extent of the devastation caused, but confirmed there were several casualties.

National Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said: “The earthquake and tsunami caused several casualties … while initial reports show that victims died in the rubble of a collapsing building.

“The number of casualties and the full impact is still being calculated.”

The water knocks down homes and smashes into trees, leaving a trail of destruction in its path, as residents cry out and try to run to safety.

The video comes as officials have confirmed a tsunami of up to two metres hit the city after a powerful earthquake rocked central Sulawesi.

Officials say waters have since receded, but families are missing.

Search operations are set to begin at first light to determine how bad the damage is, amid reports of whole families being missing in the aftermath of the natural disaster.

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Dramatic footage shows waves surging forward towards the island as terrified crowds scream (Image: Youtube)

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An earlier quake left one person dead and at least 10 others injured

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The water is filmed making its way towards the shore following an earlier earthquake (Image: Youtube)

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Aftershocks continued to occur in the area

The earthquake hit the island earlier today – just hours after a smaller tremor destroyed buildings, killing one person and injuring 10 others.

The US Geological Survey said the second quake was centred at a depth of six miles around 35 miles northeast of the town of Donggala.

In the tsunami footage, waves can be seen tumbling at a great speed towards the land, as crowds of people shout and run frantically.

The person recording the dramatic scene focuses on the fleeing crowds, before turning back to the water, where giant waves are surging forward.

The water then crashes into the island before everything suddenly goes dark, with the sounds of panicked people heard in the background.

Some families are missing following the tsunami (seen before hitting the shore) (Image: Youtube)
People are heard screaming as they flee the area
Locals look on in horror at the terrifying scene

Moments later, the camera refocuses, showing water streaming below through the streets, bringing chunks of debris with it.

The Palu Grand Mall and the Baiturrahman Mosque were hit by huge waves close to the shore, the Jakarta Post reports.

Critics have questioned why a tsunami warning was lifted before the huge waves struck in Indonesia.

The country’s Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) first issued a warning for western and central Sulawesi at 5.07pm, but revoked it around 30 minutes later.

The country’s disaster agency confirmed a tsunami had hit Palu and the city of Donggala, sweeping away homes that were in its path.

Earlier, a tsunami warning had been issued for people in Central Sulawesi and West Sulawesi provinces following the earthquake. The same area had been hit by a deadly, 6.1-magnitude quake just hours before.

Although the warning was lifted within the hour, officials asked people to remain on the alert as a number of moderate aftershocks hit.

The first quake also destroyed some houses
Another shot of the tsunami, which swept onto the island following the two quakes

“We advise people to remain in safe areas, stay away from damaged buildings,” Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, spokesman for the National Disaster Mitigation Agency, said in a TV interview earlier.

He added that the national agency in Jakarta was having difficulties reaching some authorities in the area.

The Geological Survey put the magnitude of the second quake at 7.5, after first saying it was 7.7.

According to Nugroho, the quake was felt “very strongly”.

“We expect more damage and more victims,” he said.

Indonesia sits on the Pacific Ring of Fire and is regularly hit by earthquakes
Indonesia sits on the Pacific Ring of Fire and is regularly hit by earthquakes (Image: REX/Shutterstock)

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Gempa ablum magrib didonggala

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Dapat dari group, Kondisi setelah gempa 7.7 SR Sulawesi Tengah, Donggala. #PrayForDonggala

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Indonesia sits on the Pacific Ring of Fire and is regularly hit by earthquakes.

A series of earthquakes in July and August killed nearly 500 people on the holiday island of Lombok, hundreds of kilometres southwest of Sulawesi.

And in 2004, a big earthquake off the northern Indonesian island of Sumatra triggered a tsunami across the Indian Ocean, killing 226,000 people in 13 countries, including more than 120,000 in Indonesia.

Footage of the incidents today, posted on social media, shows a number of buildings collapsed, with mounds of rubble lying on the ground.

Other clips show locals screaming and crying.

The area that was damaged was in the Sinreja District, Donggala Regency
A shake map with the epicenter of the second earthquake (Image: REX/Shutterstock)
It is later seen flooding the streets
It is later seen flooding the streets (Image: Youtube)

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Suasana sesaat setelah gempa Donggala, Palu, Sulteng

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Last month, we reported that the Indonesian island of Bali had been hit by a major tremor for the third time in less than a month.

Panicked holidaymakers and locals rushed into the streets amid fears buildings would collapse during that incident.

The quake, which sparked a tsunami warning that was later stood down, struck Bali’s neighbouring island of Lombok at the same location that was hit by a 6.4-magnitude quake that killed 14 people previously.

Model Christine Teigen and Take That star Gary Barlow were among numerous people sharing their horror experiences in the aftermath. (Click to Source)

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Pieces of mantle found rising under north and south ends of Cascadia fault

July 25, 2018, University of Oregon

piecesofmant

With four years of data from 268 seismometers on the ocean floor and several hundred on land, researchers have found anomalies in the upper mantle below both ends of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. They may influence the location, frequency and strength of earthquake events along the U.S. Pacific Northwest.

The anomalies, which reflect regions with lower seismic wave velocities than elsewhere beneath the fault line, point to pieces of the Earth’s upper mantle that are rising and buoyant because of melting rock and possibly elevated temperatures, said Miles Bodmer, a University of Oregon doctoral student who led a study now online as an accepted paper by the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

The 620-mile subduction zone, which hasn’t experienced a massive lengthwise earthquake since 1700, is where the Juan de Fuca ocean plate dips under the North American continental plate. The fault zone stretches just offshore from northern Vancouver Island to Cape Mendocino in northern California.

The mantle is rising under the southern Gorda deformation zone at the north edge of the San Andreas Fault and under the Olympic Peninsula and southern Vancouver Island.

“What we see are these two anomalies that are beneath the subducting slab in the northern and southern parts of the subduction zone,” Bodmer said. “These regions don’t have the same behavior as the entire fault. There are three segments that have their own distinct geological characteristics. The north and south segments have increased locking and increased tremor densities.”

Locking refers to how strongly two plates stick. “If they are stuck together tightly, as is the case here, they are building up stress, and you have the potential for the release of that stress, or energy, in large earthquake events,” Bodmer said.

Such quakes, while strong, are below that of the 9-plus magnitude event projected should all of Cascadia rupture at once, he said. Locking is much weaker in Cascadia’s central section, which includes most of Oregon, where infrequent, smaller quakes tend to occur from creeping along the plates.

Tremor refers to long-duration seismic signals often seen at subduction zones. “These happen deep and take more time than a typical earthquake as they rumble to release energy,” Bodmer said.

The findings won’t help earthquake forecasting, but they do point to the need for real time onshore-offshore seismic monitoring and geodetic analyses, such as from GPS to help plot spatial coordinates, of the anomalies as a next step in that direction, said co-author Douglas R. Toomey, a seismologist in the UO Department of Earth Sciences.

The study helps to make sense of Cascadia’s historical record of earthquake, he said.

The junction of the Cascadia-San Andreas faults, Toomey said, contains a lot of complexity and is the most seismically active part of contiguous North America. Seismic history also shows more earthquake activity in the Puget Sound area than in central Oregon. Both regions accumulate energy that eventually is released in large earthquakes, he said.

“Our study is worse news for Portland northward to Seattle and for southern Cascadia, but central Cascadia is not off the hook,” said Toomey, who also is lead investigator for the Oregon component of ShakeAlert, the West Coast early warning network. “More frequent earthquakes to the north and south are seen in historical seismicity patterns. This research helps to understand that.”

The study involved deep imaging, similar to CAT scans, using different forms of seismic waves coming from distant earthquakes moving through the Earth.

The ocean-bottom seismic stations, from which data were retrieved every 10 months, were part of the National Science Foundation-funded Cascadia Initiative. Older data from numerous onshore studies in the western United States also were included in the analysis.

In addition to helping to understand Cascadia’s historical earthquake record, the anomalies, Bodmer said, suggest that the two buoyant ends help to modulate plate coupling forces.

“We’re looking at structures deep within the Earth and finding evidence suggesting that they are influencing the megathrust faults and controlling where we see increases in locking and segmentation,” Bodmer said. “Knowing the timing and path of the seismic signals, we can look at velocity variation and equate that to the structures. With large offshore data sources, we might be able to better understand how a large rupture in the south might extend into central Oregon.”  (Click to Source)

 
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‘Big one’ coming? Earthquakes off the West Coast could eventually trigger a global event

Fox News

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A string of recent earthquakes off the West Coast of the U.S., ranging from 2.8 to 5.6 on the Richter scale, could help trigger the earthquake colloquially known as “the Big One.”

The map provided by the U.S. Geological Survey highlights 11 recent earthquakes, all occurring on the seabed of the Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, approximately 6 miles below the surface. The plate, which is described as “small” by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN), is fairly active, moving east-northeast at approximately 1.6 inches per year.

To date, the USGS has not issued any warnings over this spate of earthquakes, given the fairly common nature of the caliber of quakes, Don Blakeman, a geophysicist at the National Earthquake Information Center told the Daily Mail.

Part of the concern surrounding the plate is that it is not a smooth motion, but rather a motion described as “sticky,” causing strain to build up “until the fault breaks and a few meters of Juan De Fuca slips under North America in a big earthquake.”

PNSN noted that it would take a lot of slip (approximately 10s of meters) over a very large area to generate a M9 (magnitude of 9.0) level earthquake that could hit the region, but
noted that it does occur approximately every 550 years on average.

The cause for concern is what happens when the Juan de Fuca plate eventually submerges under the much larger Pacific plate. For approximately 330 years, the plate has continuously been pushed down, an activity that will eventually lead it to be pushed under the North America plate, causing the region to sink six feet on the minimum and may result in one of the largest earthquakes in human history.

If the entire 650-mile long Cascadia Subduction Zone (which includes the Juan de Fuca plate) were to experience a full rupture, it could not only trigger a 9.0 earthquake, but a tsunami as well.

The Juan De Fuca plate stretches from Northern California to British Columbia and the Cascadia Subduction Zone stretches from N. Vancouver Island to Cape Mendicino, California.

Recent studies have highlighted how vulnerable we are to the proverbial “Big One.”

Last month, one study detailed that there is a 15- to 20-mile-long stretch of the San Andreas fault ‒ called the Durmid ladder structure ‒ that could result in an earthquake with a magnitude of 7 or greater.

“This newly identified Durmid ladder structure is a voluminous, right-reverse fault zone that broadens across Durmid Hill around rotating domains of regularly spaced, left- and right-lateral cross faults,” a research article on the study reads.

The research put the odds at 75 percent that it would occur in both northern and southern California sometime over the next 30 years.

The “Big One” has been warned about several times before, with the USGS writing extensively on the topic, including how to use past earthquakes to better predict the future. (Click to Source)

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6.0-magnitude earthquake strikes off Japan’s Chiba prefecture, Felt in Tokyo

Strong 6.0 Earthquake Felt in Tokyo – Reports

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A 6.0-magnitude earthquake hit Japan Saturday evening outside Tokyo, shaking buildings in the capital, but no tsunami warning was issued, the country’s meteorological agency said.

The epicenter of the 6.0 magnitude earthquake was in Chiba Prefecture near Tokyo, at a depth of 50 km.

The underground shocks lasted for about 10 seconds and were felt in all prefectures in the central and north-eastern parts of the country, including the Japanese capital.

Local residents have been told not to panic and remain calm.

Despite the fact that the tsunami warning was canceled a few minutes after the earthquake, residents of the country have been asked not to approach the shoreline.

A crisis headquarters under the office of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has been created to engage in collection and analysis of information as to the possible consequences of the earthquake and to coordinate the work of the relevant departments related to their elimination.

Unforeseen situations at Japanese nuclear power stations have not been recorded following the earthquake, the Japanese Committee for the Control of Atomic Energy reported.

The earthquake happened amid heavy rainfalls that have been afflicting Japan for several days, killing more than 30 people. (Click to Source)

 
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Powerful 6.8 magnitude earthquake strikes in Ring of Fire

A HUGE 6.8 magnitude earthquake has struck Bolivia in the Ring of Fire.

bolivia-earthquake-693182

It occurred near Tarija in the south of the country at a depth of 344 miles.The USGS estimates there is a 34% chance of damage and fatalities.

Its website states: “Overall, the population in this region resides in structures that are resistant to earthquake shaking, though vulnerable structures exist.

“The predominant vulnerable building types are adobe block and rubble/field stone masonry construction.”

One Twitter user called Yurka Tbiliski wrote: “I was rocked by a M6.8 earthquake in 10km NNE of Carandayti, Bolivia!!!”

Bolivia earthquakeAnother called dbaBlockchain added: “That was a really strong earthquake that just hit Bolivia!”

The South American country is located in the Ring of Fire, a basin of the Pacific Ocean prone to seismic activity.

Last month, another 6.0 magnitude quake struck off the southern coast of Papua New Guinea.

It occurred 96 miles from the town of Kokopowhich, home to about 20,000 people.

Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre (PTWC) boffins issued a warning and forecast hazardous waves from the coast. (Click to Source)

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Prophecy & Political News Roundup

A lot has happened in the past few days:

1. A devastating 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck right in the heart of Papua New Guinea on Sunday causing massive devastation and killing over 30 people.  Sadly, the death toll is expected to rise as many more are injured and still others missing.  The quake triggered staggeringly massive landslides:
 
2. President Trump has won two important court battles.  In Jennings v. Rodriguez on Tuesday, the Supreme Court reversed a 9th Circuit ruling in a 5-3 decision that allows non-citizen immigrants to be detained indefinitely.  And in California, Hispanic U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel ruled that environmental rules can be waived allowing Trump’s border wall plans to proceed.
3. On Wednesday, the body of Billy Graham was laid in honor in the U.S. Capitol Building Rotunda.  He was only the fourth private citizen to ever lie in honor at the Capitol, and the first since Rosa Parks in 2005.  I don’t think Graham was a perfect man (as obviously none of us are) and neither do I think his theology was perfect (as none of ours is), but I believe that he understood the gospel and a lot of those coming out of the woodwork now against him, I think, at least in some instances, are misconstruing what he believed and taught.  You can make anyone sound like a heretic by selectively taking a few sentences out of context, but I’m interested in what someone consistently taught over a lifetime.  Graham categorically denied the false accusation of universalism (see here) and while I personally disagree with some of his teachings and methods, universalismand inclusivism are not the same thing.
Universalism (not to be confused with Universal Reconciliation “U.R.”) teaches that there are many paths to God and that Jesus is not the only way.  Universalism is a pagan, false, and heretical belief.  Inclusivism emphatically teaches that Jesus is the only way to Heaven and it upholds historic Christian beliefs, however, it teaches that Jesus will save even some who had never heard of the gospel (still only because of His atoning death on the Cross).  1 Peter 3:18–20 and Romans 2:1–16 are often offered in defense of inclusivism and it appears that Graham may have been open to this belief, however, in his 2013 book co-authored with his son Franklin, he seemed to be much more exclusivist in his leanings.
It is important to challenge heresy and defend God’s Word, but it is also important to understand what it is you’re attacking or else you might be guilty of bearing false witness and falsely accusing.  Graham preached the gospel of salvation through Christ alone to literally tens of millions of people and I will not be the judge of his heart (see Rom. 10:5–13).
I’ve never met an Evangelical Christian (at least that I’m aware of) that is a pure exclusivist.  Pure exclusivism, by definition, would mean that all babies, mentally handicapped, and Old Testament saints would not be saved.  A good discussion on this can be found on GotQuestions.org.
4. By a single vote margin, the Israeli Knesset voted to bar supermarkets and businesses from being open on the Sabbath day.  The new law also grants the Israeli government power to override municipal laws that would allow work and entertainment on the Sabbath.  It is continuing evidence that the Orthodox Jewish community is growing rapidly in the country and is successfully reverting the nation back to its ancient, biblical customs.
5. In another amazing 70 year / generational marker, Prince William will be visiting Israel, becoming the first British royal to ever make an official visit to the country.  His visit will happen this summer, not long after Israel’s 70th anniversary.


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Beginning Of The End Of Mueller’s Investigation?

mueller

For over a year we’ve heard constant accusations from the media and key Democrats that President Trump’s campaign colluded with the Russians to steal the election from Hillary Clinton.  While people closely following the investigation have spotted major holes in the accusers’ story, they have not relented—even in the face of a congressional memo that directly connected the initial FISA warrants that led to the investigation to the fake anti-Trump dossier.

Today Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein announced that the investigation has led to the indictments of 13 Russian nationals who tried to influence the election, but he made clear they appeared to have no witting American accomplices and that their efforts would not have changed the outcome of the election.  In response to the news, the President quickly tweeted that there was no collusion:

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

Russia started their anti-US campaign in 2014, long before I announced that I would run for President. The results of the election were not impacted. The Trump campaign did nothing wrong – no collusion!

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In other news, a huge 7.2 magnitude earthquake just struck near Mexico City.  Footage from Mexico is just now starting to trickle out:  (Click to Source)