Drug companies have deluged the US population with billions of opoid pills, with some areas receiving 306 pills per person each year

DEA tracked every opioid pill sold in the US.

And the results are horrific.

 

Between 2006 and 2012, 3 opioid drug makers and 6 distributors flooded the country with 76 billion pills of oxycodone and hydrocodone.

These highly addictive opioid pain medications that sparked the epidemic of abuse and overdoses that killed nearly 100,000 people in that time period.

As the epidemic surged over the seven-year period, so did the supply. The companies increased distribution from 8.4 billion in 2006 to 12.6 billion in 2012, a jump of roughly 50%.

In all, the deluge of pills was enough to supply every adult and child in the country with around 36 opioid pills per year.

Just a 10-day supply can hook 1 in 5 people into being long-term users, researchers have determined.

The stunning supply figures were first reported by the Washington Post and come from part of a database compiled by the Drug Enforcement Administration that tracked the fate of every opioid pill sold in America, from manufacturers to individual pharmacies.

A federal court in Ohio released the data this week as part of a massive consolidated court case against nearly two-dozen opioid makers and distributors, brought by nearly 2,000 cities, towns, and counties. The local governments allege that the opioid companies conspired to saturate the country with the potent painkillers to soak up billions in profits. The companies deny the allegations, arguing generally that they were serving the needs of patients.

According to an analysis of the data by the Post, just three companies made 88% of the opioid pills: SpecGx, Actavis Pharma, and Par Pharmaceutical, a subsidiary of Endo Pharmaceuticals. Purdue Pharma ranked fourth, making 3% of the pills. Just six companies distributed 75% of the pills: McKesson Corp., Walgreens, Cardinal Health, AmerisourceBergen, CVS, and Walmart.

The Post also noted that the distribution was concentrated in certain places, finding that West Virginia, Kentucky, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Nevada had the top pill-per-person-per-year rates of all states, ranging from 66.5 to 54.7. West Virginia, which had the highest distribution rate, also had the highest opioid death rate during this period.

But certain rural areas were also hard hit, with Norton, Virginia, receiving 306 pills per person per year and Mingo County, West Virginia, receiving 203.

While the local governments suing the companies have had access to this data during the litigation, it was only released to the public after the Washington Post and HD Media, publisher of the Charleston Gazette-Mail of West Virginia, sued and waged a year-long legal battle. The drug companies had fought to keep the data hidden from the public, arguing that it revealed “transactional data” that could be used by competitors. The Department of Justice also argued against the release, saying it could compromise investigations.

A three-judge panel sided with the media organizations last month. This past Monday, US District Judge Dan Polster removed a protective order allowing the release of part of the DEA’s database, called Automation of Reports and Consolidated Order System, or ARCOS. Data from years beyond 2012 are still being withheld to protect the companies and DOJ investigations.

From 1999 to 2017, nearly 400,000 people in the US died from an opioid overdose, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Just three drug makers and six distributors were behind the flood. And I am sure you know people that were dramatically hurt by this epidemic. Killing for billions of dollars. A terrifying evidence of today’s pharmaceutical companies. (Click to Source)

 

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Ohio shocker: 793 million opioid drug doses prescribed in one year

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Ohio shocker: 793 million opioid drug doses prescribed in one year

Here’s why zombies are real

By Jon Rappoport

The state government of Ohio has filed a lawsuit against five drug companies: Teva, Allergen, Johnson & Johnson, Purdue, and Endo.

The suit accuses these companies of unlawful marketing practices that have led to Ohio’s opioid addiction “problem.”

Here’s the big one: the suit states that, in 2012, a staggering 793 million doses of opioid drugs were prescribed to Ohio citizens. That translates to an average of 68 pills for each person in Ohio.

The suit accuses the drug makers of conspiring to influence opinion leaders and various medical groups. This marketing blitz resulted in deceptive treatment guidelines, false information delivered at medical conferences, and misleading “science” articles—all designed to minimize the dire effects of opioids.

Well, yes, these painkillers (e.g., OxyContin) do kill pain. In the process, they also creation addiction and turn minds to mush.

Apparently, Ohio is pretty much in a collective trance state. We’re talking Zombification. 793 million opioid doses in one year.

Don’t forget the doctors who prescribe the drugs. As a group, they can’t care about their patients’ state of mind. Just load people up to the eyeballs with chemical pacification.

If you think this over-prescription epidemic corresponds to the actual amount of physical pain Ohio citizens are experiencing, think again. The drugs are obviously being handed out for other reasons: to sustain and feed addiction; to “treat depression”; to “manage dissatisfaction with life.” In other words, drug companies are promoting an ongoing profit bonanza for themselves. The human consequences don’t matter. (Click to Article)

Drug companies “buy” positive research results, reveals shocking BMJ study; the entire body of Big Pharma ‘evidence’ must now be questioned

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(Natural News) If you ever wanted to know why it is vital that the incoming Trump administration implement dramatic reforms of the pharmaceutical industry, this should answer that question comprehensively.

To say that Big Pharma is corrupt is an understatement, especially after a shocking new study published in the British Medical Journal found that drug makers actually purchase positive field trial results so that it will be easier, cheaper and quicker to get new drugs approved.

As reported by The Daily Sheeple, financial ties between researchers and Big Pharma firms “are independently associated with positive trial results, suggesting bias in the evidence base,” according to the new study.

For their study, which was published in the BMJ, researchers analyzed results from 195 drug trials that were reported in 2013. Led by experts from the University of California-San Francisco, the research team discovered that in more than half of clinical trials – 58 percent – the lead scientist in the study had at least some level of financial ties to the company that made the drug under testing. (RELATED: Keep current with the most recent medical scandals at Medicine.news)

Included in the cozy relationships were direct payments to researchers, honorariums, paid travel expenses, stock ownership and payment for “advisory” work. (Click to Article)

Drug Companies Flooded W.V. With More Than 780 Million Pain Pills

The distributors ‘knew what was going on.’ They just ‘didn’t care.’

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The United States is embroiled in a fierce battle against opioid abuse. In 2014, there was a 3.4-fold increase in the number of opioid overdose deaths in America. The state hit hardest by the opioid crisis is West Virginia, where drug companies pumped 782 million pain pills into the state over the last 6 years.

In 2015, West Virginia had the highest rate of opioid overdose deaths in the country. Since 1999, overdose deaths have quadrupled in the state.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail obtained previously confidential drug shipping sales records sent by the DEA to West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey’s office. The paper used the records to disclose the number of pain pills sold to every pharmacy in the state, as well as the drug companies’ shipments to all 55 counties in West Virginia between 2007 and 2012.

Their findings, both astounding and infuriating, were documented in a report published in the paper on December 17.

One drug company shipped nearly 9 million hydrocodone pills to a single pharmacy in Mingo County over the course of 2 years. The rural, impoverished county has the 4th-highest prescription opioid death rate of any county in the U.S. (Click to Article)

Antidepressants: Drugs make people ‘TWICE as likely to think about suicide’ study claims

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A review of trials of antidepressants taken by healthy adults with no signs of a mental health disorder has found the drugs used to treat the illness doubled the harms related to suicide and violence.

Experts working on the study said the analysis was undertaken because the harms of antidepressants, including the risk of suicide, are often explained away as if they are disease symptoms or only a problem in children.

Professor Peter Gøtzsche, of the Nordic Cochrane Centre and lead author of the study, said: “While it is now generally accepted that antidepressants increase the risk of suicide and violence in children and adolescents, most people believe that these drugs are not dangerous for adults.

“This is a potentially lethal misconception.” (Click to Article)

NY Attorney General confirms real-life conspiracy among drug companies

(NaturalNews) The office of the New York Attorney General and the American units of Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd. and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. have come to terms on a settlement involving claims that an agreement between the two Big Pharma companies restricted competition unlawfully.

Both companies agreed to pay a small fine (by comparison) of $150,000 to New York State and to cease making similar agreements in the future as part of the settlement, Reuters reported. Neither company admitted or denied the allegations, but the settlement absolves them of having to do so.

By settling, the companies have ended an investigation that was being conducted by the state into an agreement that was signed by both in 2010 to sell a generic version of Pfizer, Inc.’s cholesterol-lowering drug Lipitor in the U.S., while not horning in on the exclusivity rights of other generic drugs sold by the pharmaceutical companies. Per Reuters:

The agreement was drawn up as a contingency plan to allow Israel’s Teva to sell the generic Lipitor, or atorvastatin calcium, in case Ranbaxy’s version was not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration before Lipitor lost its patent protection on November 30, 2011.

While India’s Ranbaxy, majority-owned by Japan’s Daiichi Sankyo Co Ltd, eventually got FDA approval in time, the agreement remained in place and could have been used to protect other drugs made by the two companies.

‘Pay-for-delay’

“Agreements between drug manufacturers to protect each other’s market positions violate fundamental principles of antitrust law, and can lead to higher drug prices,” Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said in a statement.

While the agreement related only to the sale of the one drug, it included a “no-challenge” clause, which allowed both companies to shield from competition, as well as legal and regulatory challenges, scores of other medications, according to the NY attorney general’s office, which added, however, that no anti-competitive effects due to the agreement had been identified during the investigation.

Schneiderman says the entire ordeal represents the application of a recent legal precedent that arose from challenges of “pay-for-delay” agreements that were established between makers of brand-name and generic drugs.

Those deals, where a brand-name Pharma company pays a generic rival not to sell their versions of a drug at a much-reduced price, have caught the attention of regulators in countries all over the world, because such agreements raise patient-care costs as well as the public sector’s costs to cover healthcare treatments.

Criminal enterprise

“Ranbaxy… continues to believe that the agreement was pro-competitive and an important part of making the product readily available to patients and the U.S. healthcare system in a timely fashion,” a Ranbaxy spokesman said in an email to Reuters, but the other company involved, Teva, would not comment.

“The settlement is positive for (Ranbaxy). The settlement amount will not significantly impact the company,” said Sarabjit Kour Nangra, an analyst at Angel Broking, as quoted by the newswire service.

Ranbaxy was banned from exporting drugs to the U.S. after failing to abide by U.S. Food and Drug Administration manufacturing standards.

Natural News has reported on illegal activity committed by Big Pharma companies often in the past. As our editor, Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, has documented, anyone who has labeled the industry as little more than a criminal enterprise has been vindicated time and again. In 2012, Mike wrote:

Drug and vaccine manufacturer Merck was caught red-handed by two of its own scientists faking vaccine efficacy data by spiking blood samples with animal antibodies. GlaxoSmithKline has just been fined a whopping $3 billion for bribing doctors, lying to the FDA, hiding clinical trial data and fraudulent marketing. Pfizer, meanwhile has been sued by the nation’s pharmacy retailers for what is alleged as an “overarching anticompetitive scheme” to keep generic cholesterol drugs off the market and thereby boost its own profits.

This latest settlement with authorities in New York further documents the previous pattern of criminality.

Sources:

http://www.reuters.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

Click to http://www.naturalnews.com/044010_drug_companies_real-life_conspiracy_NY_Attorney_General.html

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