Eight years on water woes threaten Fukushima cleanup with fish found around the waters of Hawaii and Alaska contaminated with cesium 134 the radioactive finger-print of Fukushima

Friday, 8 March 2019

The silence surrounding the Fukushima disaster recently has been deafening, it is one year in fact since any reliable information has been released from Tokyo Electric Power Co, the owners of the stricken plant.
Last year, Tokyo Electric Power Co said a system meant to purify contaminated water had failed to remove dangerous radioactive contaminants.
A report from Reuters today, claims most of that water – stored in 1,000 tanks around the plant – will need to be reprocessed before it is released into the ocean, the most likely scenario for disposal.
Reprocessing could take nearly two years and divert personnel and energy from dismantling the tsunami-wrecked reactors, a project that will take up to 40 years, (which is only an estimate as Tepco still haven’t invented the technology to fix the problem, they could still be trying to fix the problem in 2060.)
It is unclear how much that would delay decommissioning. But any delay could be pricey; the government estimated in 2016 that the total cost of plant dismantling, decontamination of affected areas, and compensation, would amount to 21.5 trillion yen ($192.5 billion), roughly 20 per cent of the country’s annual budget.
Tepco is already running out of space to store treated water. And should another big quake strike, (which is a question of when and NOT if), experts say tanks could crack, unleashing tainted liquid and washing highly radioactive debris into the ocean.
Exactly one year ago today, The Big Wobble released an article, claiming during the summer of 2017, 50,000 trillion Becquerel’s of radiation leaked into the Pacific, however, Tepco continue to claim tritium poses little risk to human health and is quickly diluted by the ocean.
300 tons of radioactive water is leaking daily into the Pacific and there is no known technology to fix it.
In one of the world’s worst nuclear disasters, the Nos. 1 to 3 units experienced fuel meltdowns while the No. 1, No. 3 and No. 4 units were also severely damaged by hydrogen explosions following a massive earthquake and tsunami in March 2011.
To prevent leakage of tainted water,  Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) had installed a costly “ice wall” to keep groundwater from seeping into the stricken Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, however, data from the operator shows, it had failed.
The aim was to freeze the soil into a solid mass that blocks groundwater flowing from the hills west of the plant to the coast.
However, the continuing seepage has created vast amounts of toxic water that Tepco must pump out, decontaminate and store in tanks at Fukushima that now number 1,000, holding 1 million tonnes, which will at some time be dumped into the Pacific.
Last July TEPCO released around 770,000 tons of highly radioactive water into the Pacific Ocean.
A study by the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa have revealed almost 50% of fish consumed on the islands of Hawai’i were contaminated with caesium 134 the radioactive finger-print of Fukushima.
The report also showed that migrating organisms can transport the Fukushima-signature (caesium 134) over significant distances as they showed detectable 134Cs (6.3±1.5 Bq/kg) in Pacific bluefin tuna caught off the California coast only a year after the incident.
Another study found caesium 134 in longfin tuna (Albacore) along the western coast of the US just one year after the Fukushima disaster.
It’s another blow for the stricken nuclear plant with TEPCO claiming the clean-up of the site will take at least 40 years.

Last year The Big Wobble received an email from Bill Laughing Bear, our friend in Alaska who is monitoring the radiation in fish along the Alaskan coast.

Greetings, Gary!

The up-to-date and timely information your website delivers just brought a new topic to my mind: Fukushima. On your March 8, 2018, posting about another million tons of toxic waste to be dumped into the Pacific, the thought occurred to me ‘how much more radiation would I be reading in this coming year’s fish harvest than when the Fukushima nuclear disaster on March 11, 2011, changed our world forever?’

As a musher in Alaska, I have often been blessed from collecting numerous people’s previous year’s salmon catch as they cleaned out their freezers, making room for the current year’s catch. I fed it to my dog team and I ate endless pounds of it myself. I also have enjoyed standing on the banks of some of our first class rivers while fishing for salmon with a pole which I no longer do.

When the Fukushima fiasco occurred, it was obvious to me that with the currents that come up the coast of Alaska from Japan, we were in trouble. I believed our fishing resources would become radioactive and because I love my dogs as most would love their family members, I knew I had to verify this food supply was safe.

Talking to anyone I could who was supposedly in the “know,” I was assured there would be no problem. That did not ease my mind. I decided to invest in a radiation monitor of my own. Being a disabled veteran with a limited income, I set out to buy a meter of the best value I could with my minimal resources. I was told that the most common monitor being used in Japan that people living near the Fukushima area use is the Radex RD 1503. This meter is made in Moscow, Russia, by Quarta-Rad Limited.

The Russian people who had to deal with the monster, Chernobyl, manufactured a quality radiation monitor and I decided to order one. The meter cost me approximately $160.00 U.S. Funds. This monitor was designed for detection and evaluation of the level of ionizing radiation and for the evaluation of contamination levels of materials and products. Although a good monitor, it cannot be used for official conclusions about radiation, environment and fouling factors. The meter estimates the radiation environment in the magnitude of the ambient equivalent power of gamma radiation dose taking into account the pollution of objects by beta sources. The meter reads two ways: microSievert per hour or microRoentgen per hour.

Once obtaining the meter, I started taking readings of people’s salmon. By the second year after the Fukushima incident, all salmon I scanned read radioactive. I have seen a steady increase in radiation levels of salmon through last year with not one salmon failing to register some contamination.

Last year I checked my first halibut which came from local waters. It, too, registered radiation. Since halibut are bottom feeders, I thought this might explain why, on my walks along the beach and seeing at various times dead crab, the occasional sea otter, and a couple of times more jellyfish than I could count, not to mention numerous birds.

In my attempts to find what constitutes safe levels of radiation, official agencies do not seem to be able to agree on just what those safety levels are. I will say that I have found an increase of over 27% of radiation levels since around 2012. So whether the data I have observed is minimal or should be alarming, it is definitely building every year.

Last year, a woman I know, who had just been released from the hospital after receiving numerous doses of radiation had me scan her body. It read lower than the salmon taken out of her freezer.

Three days ago I talked with a commercial fisherman whom I respect and I asked him what he had heard about radiation levels and salmon. He told me they have been told there is no radiation problem in salmon and they are healthy. I told him that I was finding constant radiation and I would come over and scan his salmon in his freezer if he wanted me to. He was visually shaken.

Many of us have chosen to no longer consume for ourselves or our dogs any seafood off the Pacific Coast. From what I understand, radiation can build up in one’s system.

I have also been warned by my friends and numerous others whose fish I have scanned to be quiet about this because it might not go well with me. But ethically I feel I have a moral obligation to my fellow man and I am issuing a strong alert about the condition I have personally found with the salmon and halibut in Alaskan waters. I do not want anyone to suffer a “slow burn” with their health and life. (Click to Source)

That’s it from Alaska for now.
Recovery Room 7 is a community of people with similar backgrounds, where people from all walks of drug & alcohol recovery can meet together, share, socialize, interact, join in fun activities, share meals, pray and learn. It’s a place of joy and awakening to their true purpose in life. Jesus Christ is always present and ready to receive everyone in Recovery Room 7. We will be located in beautiful Northwest Montana. If you would like to donate to get Recovery Room 7 up and running, please go to our PayPal Donation Link here.

Media ignores Fukushima as probable cause of declining West Coast marine populations

(NaturalNews) Scientists are warning about an alarming decline of marine life along the western coast of North America, with bizarre episodes of malnourished sea lions, starving brown pelicans, whales and dolphins migrating out of season – and a rapidly and drastically declining sardine population.

The disappearance of the sardines, a major food source for mammals and seabirds, as well as farmed fish and humans, has become a major topic of discussion – as fishery operations for this small, oily and important forage fish faces sudden collapse.

A collapse of sardine populations

Commercial fishing for sardines off of Canada’s West Coast is worth an estimated $32 million – but now they are suddenly gone. Back in October,fisherman reported that they came back empty-handed without a single fish after 12 hours of trolling and some $1000 spent on fuel.

Sandy Mazza, for the Daily Breeze, reported a similar phenomenon in central California: “[T]he fickle sardines have been so abundant for so many years – sometimes holding court as the most plentiful fish in coastal waters – that it was a shock when he couldn’t find one of the shiny silver-blue coastal fish all summer, even though this isn’t the first time they’ve vanished.” [emphasis added]

It is not only the commercial value of sardines but their importance as a high-energy staple for whales, dolphins, sea lions, bluefin tuna, pelicans and other sea birds that makes this so significant. Steve Marx, a policy analyst for the Pew Charitable Trust, commented that the shortage “does not bode well for everything in the ocean that relies on sardines to get big and fat and healthy.”

Contaminated water from Fukushima has arrived on the West Coast

While the reasons for these changes may be as complex as the ecological food web that connects them, no one is discussing the elephant in the room – Fukushima.

Admittedly, the contaminated radioactive water being dumped into the Pacific Ocean from the Japanese Fukushima plant has been circulating towards the West since the March 2011 nuclear accident.

The research community knew months before the public was told that high concentrations of cesium-137 had reached the shores of Alaska, British Columbia and California, and will soon reach Mexico. This bombardment of contaminated radioactive water will continue for years to come, with the best estimates showing that the levels will not peak for several years.

Cold-water sardines shifting with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation cycle

The likely impact of Fukushima on marine life throughout the Pacific is compounded by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation – which science only discovered as of 1997 but now believes is a major factor in shifting sardine populations and replacing them with anchovies. This cycle shifts the temperature of Pacific water over the course of decades, replacing warmer water with colder and vice versa, according to the North Pacific gyre’s circular clockwise motion.

Only now, the cycling Pacific waters are also carrying with these shifting temperatures the contaminated radioactive waters flowing from Fukushima toward the West Coast – along with the cool water phase that makes high sardine populations less likely.

Earlier last century, the sardine fishery created a huge boom in Monterey, California’s “Cannery Row,” where enormous amounts of the fish were canned, before the population declined sharply to base levels in the late 50s, where they remained until they began rebounding in the mid-1980s, again driving a boom industry and peaking in about 1999. The sardines recovered again starting about 2003 but have since headed straight for the bottom again after peak numbers at nearly the same time as the Fukushima disaster.

How it is impacting whales and other marine life

The shortage of sardines and other prey is being blamed for some 1,600 sea lion pups that have been diagnosed as “malnourished” by marine biologists working along the West Coast. It is believed that the mother seals didn’t produce enough milk to sustain their young. The same was found with brown pelicans, who’ve demonstrated tell-tale signs of starvation and produced fewer babies.

The quota for the sardine catch was lowered back in November by the Pacific Fishery Management Council after confirmation of severely dwindling population numbers; environmental groups like Oceana have demanded a complete halt to sardine fishing to prevent collapse.

“Is it El Nino? Pacific Decadal Oscillation? [La] Nina? Long-term climate change? More marine mammals eating sardines? Did they all go to Mexico or farther offshore? We don’t know. We’re pretty sure the overall population has declined. We manage them pretty conservatively because we don’t want to end up with another Cannery Row so, as the population declines, we curb fishing.” said National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) official Kerry Griffin.

The Monterey County Weekly, a regional publication, highlighted some of the majesty of humpback whale watching ahead of its feature article on the decline of sardines, in part due to over-fishing.

Author David Schmalz wrote, “There’s so much poetry in motion that it’s hard to resist the idea that you are witnessing something historic, that these humpback whales – nearly all of whom normally migrate to Mexico some time in the fall – are trying to tell us something. And they are, if we listen.”

The message is that anchovies have replaced much of the missing sardines as a major marine food source, which may explain the early migration of huge populations of whales.

Yet some fisherman have also turned up a zero-catch on anchovies, just after pulling in giant hauls that many have been relying upon to replace their usual sardine catch. Others have increasingly turned to market squid.

There are other signs, too, of things out of the ordinary: the first ever documented, photographed case of conjoined twin Gray whales washed up on shores in Baja California, Mexico – underdeveloped and apparently miscarried. There is no immediate explanation for the abnormal occurrence.

Sources for this article include:

http://enenews.com

http://www.presstelegram.com

http://enenews.com

http://www.montereycountyweekly.com

http://www.latimes.com

http://www.takepart.com

http://link.springer.com

http://www.pices.int

http://www.theepochtimes.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Click to http://www.naturalnews.com/043675_Fukushima_marine_populations_West_Coast.html

Radiation levels at Fukushima plant increases to 800% of government standard

(NaturalNews) Radiation at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant has now exceeded more than eight times the radiation limit set by the Japanese government – presenting new concerns for problems that many say are exacerbating.

The largely government-owned Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) admitted that radiation levels had elevated to an estimated 8 millisieverts per year (mSv/y) outside of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant in December.

This greatly eclipses the Japanese government-set limit of 1 mSv/y, put in place as part of the officially-sanctioned reactor decommissioning plan for the disaster-stricken nuclear plant as a safety measure to diminish the level of harmful effects on the surrounding areas so that the exclusion zone can eventually be lifted.

According to NHK, Japan’s public broadcaster, the plant was measuring at below the required 1 mSv/y benchmark back in March 2013, but the increasing emission of beta-rays from the contaminated water, and particularly strontium-90, stored in above-ground tanks was spiking these levels. However, theAsahi Shimbun reported that a very high level of 7.8 mSv/y was recorded back in May 2013.

Official media accounts blamed the approximately 1,000 above-ground storage tanks, explaining that the metal tank containers reportedly amplify the beta-rays to create stronger X-rays and, thus, higher readings.

Asahi carried this account of the official explanation: “Beta rays released from radioactive strontium and other substances in the water reacted with iron and other elements in the storage tank containers to generate the X-rays, the officials said.”

TEPCO and the Japanese government knew about elevated radiation, but didn’t bother to tell the public

Government officials admit, as NHK reports, that they have been aware of the issue of beta-ray emission for “a certain period of time” but have not addressed it due to overriding concerns with the volume of contaminated water – some 300-400 tons of which is leaking into the Pacific Ocean on a daily basis.

The Asahi Shimbun revealed January 8 that TEPCO had been hiding public disclosure of more than 140 measurements showing excessive strontium levels – claiming at the time that they were “wrong,” because they were above the total beta-ray numbers in some cases.

Company officials “insisted” that there was no attempt to conceal information, but rather that the concerns were over accuracy. TEPCO claims that it will release “corrected” reading numbers by the end of the month after reconciling them for inconsistencies.

Once again, both Japanese government and TEPCO officials were complicit in keeping the truth from the public, both there among the Japanese population and abroad in international circles.

A memorandum of cooperation between the International Atomic Energy Agency and Fukushima, and also the Fukui Prefecture, was recently revealed, proving that a confidentiality clause exists between the United Nations-level atomic safety agency and TEPCO officials, allowing proprietary information to be kept from disclosure and to be restricted under classification. This agreement pertains in particular to the decontamination of the Fukushima plant, the waste management of radioactive materials and the release of surveys on the radiological effect on human health conducted by the Fukushima Medical University.

Since public admissions that Fukushima had reached levels of 8 mSv/y, officials have been scrambling to increase monitoring and mitigation strategies.

Japan’s Nuclear Regulation Authority has been meeting in recent days to evaluate how to manage these excessive levels and minimize the amount of escaping radiation, as efforts have been made to increase monitoring stations in the surrounding areas of the exclusion zone.

The Nuclear Regulation Authority effectively doubled the number of radiation monitoring devices it had set up, expanding its deployment of 446 instruments to 815. These nearly 400 extra monitors were installed in a reported 12 cities, towns and villages in the area. The devices allow testing of the air just above the ground at 10-minute intervals.

The full scale of effects has yet to be seen, as radiation levels continue to increase and the control of contaminated water remains an uphill battle.

Sources for this article include:

http://enenews.com

http://fukushimaupdate.com

http://ajw.asahi.com

http://ajw.asahi.com

http://nuclear-news.net

http://science.naturalnews.com

Click to http://www.naturalnews.com/043601_radiation_levels_Fukushima_nuclear_plant_government_figures.html

Radioactive fish continue to be caught near Fukushima

(NaturalNews) Japan used to account for 15 percent of global fish catches, but now, nearly three years after the earthquake and subsequent tsunami which struck Fukushima’s Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011, sales are plummeting in Fukushima and the surrounding prefectures, as the world focuses intently on radiation levels mounting in the Pacific Ocean’s sea life.

The Japanese government-affiliated Fisheries Research Agency just announced on January 10th that it had caught a black seabream fish contaminated with 12,400 becquerels per kilogram of radioactive cesium – an amount 124 times higher than the safety standard. Two other black seabreams were found to breach the 100 Bq/kg limit at 426 Bq/kg and 197 Bq/kg.

Stories like this only confirm that Fukushima radiation is not decreasing but continuing to accumulate. Five prefectures which catch some 40,000 tons of fish every year appear to be directly affected by Fukushima, and taking radiation measurements after a catch has become just a routine part of fishing there now. Fish being caught in the waters around Fukushima are still dangerously contaminated with high levels of radiation, and the majority of these catches get destroyed rather than end up in a market or a restaurant.

In an interview, economist Hirokai Kurosaki told RT, “Most of the fish caught within the 30 kilometer radius is thrown into the garbage because it is radiated. And TEPCO is paying to local fishermen for it, so that they’re happy and keep silent on that.”

Plummeting seafood sales

Although consumers were reportedly just starting to trust the system enough to buy seafood again, Japan’s fishing industry took another big hit when the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) finally admitted in Summer 2013 that 300 tons of irradiated groundwater had been flowing out into the ocean every day and that it had been, potentially the whole time, since the disaster struck in March 2011. In addition, Michio Aoyama, senior researcher at the geochemical research department of the Meteorological Research Institute, recently reported that some 60 billion becquerels of cesium-137 and strontium-90 are being discharged into the Pacific Ocean from the ditch at the north end of the reactors every single day.

Japanese seafood fears are spreading to other countries as well. In South Korea, fish imports from all eight prefectures surrounding Fukushima have been completely banned. Seoul’s Noryangjin fish market, one of South Korea’s largest, has had to put up banners imploring skittish customers that the fish sold there is safe to eat. Despite the promises, sales are still slumping. Even South Korean fish sales have begun dwindling, Korean fish market stall owner Kim Byung-guk told Euronews.

‘It’s pretty much under control – we’ve built fences.’

A TEPCO spokesman told the LA Times that there are roughly a thousand tanks of various sizes holding contaminated water on the Daiichi plant property, and new stories of fresh leaks come out all the time, leaving one to wonder how many more leaks there are that aren’t being reported on.

One reason these leaks might be so prevalent: A former clean-up worker recently told the Asahi Shimbun newspaper that he was instructed to fix a gap in the top of a 10-meter-tall storage tank that had been shut with nothing more than basic adhesive tape. When he asked about the tape, he was told that it was a makeshift measure employed to deal with the ever-increasing stockpile of polluted water kept onsite.

According to TEPCO, not only is any irradiated groundwater that reaches the Pacific Ocean somehow magically confined to an area just in front of the damaged plant, but now plant officials insist that the situation is “pretty much under control,” because they’ve built fences to keep contaminated water from reaching the ocean.

Pardon this writer for not being a part-time architect or civil engineer, but when it comes to building safety structures, a fence doesn’t really impart a lot of confidence when it comes to stopping dangerous, irradiated water.

Sources for this article include:

http://ajw.asahi.com

http://rt.com

http://www.latimes.com

http://ajw.asahi.com

http://www.euronews.com

http://www.bloomberg.com

http://science.naturalnews.com

Click to  http://www.naturalnews.com/043531_radioactive_fish_Fukushima_radiation_contamination.html