After Big Pharma Failed, Parents Risked All To Save Daughter’S Life With Cannabis — It Worked!

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“She will look at me, smile and say ‘mama.’ And that is a gift that gives me a feeling I will never be able to describe.”

In the age of medical cannabis enlightenment, Colorado is becoming a place where miracles happen. The story of ‘Super Nova’ represents the hope, challenges and lives transformed of parents desperately seeking to heal their suffering children – in a state where nascent freedom battles the entrenched forces of oppression.

The Free Thought Project obtained an exclusive interview with the mother of Nova, a beautiful 5-year-old girl born with a very rare condition called Schizencephaly. Nova’s mother, whom we will refer to as Barbara, told us about her journey from Texas to Colorado to save her daughter’s life, and even give her the gift of laughter.

Barbara is documenting Nova’s incredible story on Facebook, where she has gained more than 61,000 adoring, supportive fans. As she describes on her website,sweetsupernova.weebly.com:

“When Nova was four months old, we got the phone call on a Saturday night, from an endocrinologist, asking us if we had a minute to sit down and talk.

My world was flipped upside down when she told me more than half of my child’s brain hadn’t developed during pregnancy. Born without a pituitary gland, legally blind, and with a large unilateral cleft consisting of almost the whole right side of her brain.

She would never sit, walk, talk, and she would most likely suffer from epilepsy. She would have to take growth hormone shots every night in her stomach back and legs, she would have to take thyroid pills and steroids to keep her alive, and while there was a chance she wouldn’t have seizures, they were more likely to happen than not.” (Click to Article)

Independent startup now mapping the marijuana genome to protect it from Monsanto

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(NaturalNews) As the evidence supporting marijuana’s healing properties continues to grow, the number of businesses getting involved with the commercialization of the plant also continues to expand. And despite the DEA’s refusal to reschedule cannabis and relax federal laws surrounding marijuana, states continue to vote on and enforce their own laws surrounding the cannabis plant – particularly to acknowledge its medicinal properties.

So far, a number of states have legalized marijuana for medical use, and some have even legalized recreational use.

The expansion of marijuana’s legality will undoubtedly create large opportunities for the industry. It has been suggested that the actions of these states will lead to the creation of a very viable market for marijuana across North America.

That’s why it’s not really that surprising that in 2015 rumors about Monsanto’s desire to get involved with the cannabis industry began to circulate. Alternative news outlets were the first to report on it, and marijuana advocates were quick to criticize Monsanto’s plans for creating a monopoly on the plant. (Click to Article)

Hemp Eats Radiation, Cleans Toxic Metals From Soil

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It appears the uses of hemp are endless. In addition to myriad industrial products such as paper, construction material, clothing, food and fuel, hemp is also known to draw out toxic substances from the soil. In other words, not only does hemp provide humans with innumerable products, it also helps to clean the environment of the mistakes we have made in the past. It has already been discovered that hemp may be extremely useful in the removal of cadmium from the soil and other toxic metals, as well as radiation.

In fact, hemp has been seen as so successful in removing radiation from the soil that it is even being considered for use in Fukushima for the purposes of drawing out radiation. the process by which hemp cleans polluted soil is called phytoremediation – a term given to the process of using green plants to clean up the environment or “remediate” soil or water that has been contaminated with heavy metals and excess minerals. Two plants that are members of the mustard family as well as sunflowers have been known to do the same for many years. And hemp is now finding itself in the same category.

As MintPress News wrote on October 6, 2015,

A group of representatives of Consolidated Growers and Processors, PHYTOTECH, and Ukraine’s Institute of Bast Crops experimented in the late 1990s with using industrial hemp, a form of the plant that’s high in fiber but low in psychoactive or medical benefits, near the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, where a great deal of agricultural land is still unusable because of the presence of radiation and heavy metals still lingering from the 1986 meltdown.
“Hemp is proving to be one of the best phyto-remediative plants we have been able to find,” said Slavik Dushenkov, a research scientist with PHYTOTECH.
In 2009, scientists from Belarus also experimented with hemp in areas polluted by Chernobyl. The disaster contaminated nearly 20 miles around the site.
The Belarusian scientists noted that one added benefit of industrial hemp over other phytoremediation plants is that it can also be used to produce biofuel, potentially adding a second use for the crop after it removes toxins from the soil.
“As with the Chernobyl incident, scientists are finding radioactive emissions and toxic metals–including iodine, cesium-137, strontium-90, and plutonium–concentrated in the soil, plants, and animals of Japan, but also now throughout the United States and all along the West Coast – from Canada to Mexico,” Sarich wrote for Nation of Change. (Click to Article)

Manufacturer of addictive prescription drugs donates $500,000 to fight cannabis legalization

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(NaturalNews) The campaign to preventcannabis legalization in Arizona recently accepted a half-million dollar donation from a pharmaceutical company accused of peddling a dangerous narcotic painkiller off-label.

Drug company Insys made the donation to Arizonans for Responsible Drug Policy on Aug. 31, according to information posted by the Arizona Secretary of State. The revelation has lent support to longstanding claims by legalization proponents that drug companies view cannabis as a source of competition for their more addictive, dangerous and expensive products.

“Our opponents have made a conscious decision to associate with this company,” said J.P. Holyoak, chairman of the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol. “They are now funding their campaign with profits from the sale of opioids – and maybe even the improper sale of opioids. We hope that every Arizonan understands that Arizonans for Responsible Drug Policy is now a complete misnomer.” (Click to Article)

DEA claims cannabis holds no medicinal value even as the federal government owns the PATENT on its use as a medicine

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(NaturalNews) For decades, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), of the herbcannabis sativa, has been at the top of the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) hit list. This targeted plant and its natural properties continue to be classified as a schedule one drug on the DEA’s senseless drug scheduling system. Cannabis is listed alongside meth and LSD for having “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.” The DEA is adamant about controlling cannabis, even at a time when state governments are decriminalizing it altogether and allowing for its use in medical treatments. (Click to Article)

Marijuana Overdoses Kill 37 in Colorado On First Day of Legalization

Colorado is reconsidering its decision to legalize recreational pot following the deaths of dozens due to marijuana overdoses.

According to a report in the Rocky Mountain News, 37 people were killed across the state on Jan. 1, the first day the drug became legal for all adults to purchase. Several more are clinging onto life in local emergency rooms and are not expected to survive.

“It’s complete chaos here,” says Dr. Jack Shepard, chief of surgery at St. Luke’s Medical Center in Denver. “I’ve put five college students in body bags since breakfast and more are arriving every minute.

“We are seeing cardiac arrests, hypospadias, acquired trimethylaminuria and multiple organ failures. By next week the death toll could go as high as 200, maybe 300. Someone needs to step in and stop this madness. My god, why did we legalize marijuana? What were we thinking?”

Rainin’ Fire in the Sky

Colorado and Washington state approved the sale of marijuana for recreational use in November though statewide ballot measures. Under the new policies pot is legal for adult use, regulated like alcohol and heavily taxed.

One of the principal arguments of legalization advocates was that cannabis has long been considered safer than alcohol and tobacco and was not thought not to cause overdose. But a brave minority tried to warn Coloradans of the drug’s dangers.

“We told everyone this would happen,” says Peter Swindon, president and CEO of local brewer MolsonCoors. “Marijuana is a deadly hardcore drug that causes addiction and destroys lives.

“When was the last time you heard of someone overdosing on beer? All these pro-marijuana groups should be ashamed of themselves. The victims’ blood is on their hands.”

One of the those victims was 29-year-old Jesse Bruce Pinkman, a former methamphetamine dealer from Albuquerque who had recently moved to Boulder to establish a legal marijuana dispensary.

Pinkman was partying with friends when he suffered several seizures and a massive heart attack which ultimately proved to be fatal. Toxicology reports revealed that marijuana was the only drug present in his system.

“This is just a terrible tragedy,” says his friend Peter. “Jesse was trying to go legit and now this happens? I guess drugs really are as dangerous as they say.”

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, who opposed the ballot initiative that legalized the drug, says he will call a special legislative session to try and overturn the new law.

“We can’t sit idly by and allow this slaughter to continue,” he said during a press conference Thursday.

Click to http://dailycurrant.com/2014/01/02/marijuana-overdoses-kill-37-in-colorado-on-first-day-of-legalization/