Torah Commentary – Sh’mot (Names) – His Ways – January 6, 2017

Torah Commentary
Sh’mot (Names)
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Exodus 1:1-6:1
Isaiah 27:6-28:13; 29:22-23
Matthew 22:23-33; 41-46
Acts 3:12-15
Hebrew 11:23-26

His Ways

Just a few days ago we entered into the Gregorian year of 2018. The thought of that seems a bit strange. You may even be one who would say you never imagined how this world system could possibly have lasted this long. I can relate.
Truth is, we are here and with the new year a verse keeps being brought to my mind. Isaiah 55:8 says “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, and your ways are not my ways.” That verse makes more sense to me with each passing day.
The Hebrews in Egypt must have had thoughts concerning this not yet recorded concept. For those who had been keeping up with history, they must have been shaking their heads with unbelief. How could they have gone from the great honor of their recent ancestors to slavery in exile? What happened through these short years?
Maybe a clue to this question is found in Exodus 1:23. In the verse it is recorded that the Hebrews cried out, but it does not say they cried out to HaShem. It just says they were crying. Is it possible they had given up on the promises they had been given through their ancestor Abraham so many years earlier? Is it in the forgetting of the promises they had forgotten who they were and Whom they belonged to? Had they been so long in exile they had given up? Are those words mirroring some of our thoughts today?
Truth is, whether His family is in Egypt or anywhere else called exile His thoughts and ways are not going to line up with ours. His thoughts and ways are to bring forth a greater work than ours would ever accomplish.
Now they may think they are forgotten, but we know they are not, because we have the benefit of being able to read the rest of the story and we know the outcome. With this we can sit back and be experts at telling them what they should have done while all the while dealing with the same faith failures they went through. Think of it this way. What if a book is being written about our exile which others will one day be able to read. They could be experts to!
Now they may have thought they were forgotten, but truth is there were great works being done which were way beyond their thoughts. The first work was being done in them. In Egypt Yah was growing His family to numbers Abraham would probably never imagined. In the growing of the family numerically, it does appear that they forgot to grow spiritually. Not pointing fingers, just a floating thought to ponder. The other work being done was about a shepherd being prepared to lead them. Without that shepherd they would not have even made it to the sea much less into the wilderness and for some the Promise Land.
In the past years there has been much talk and teaching about what is referred to as the Greater Exodus. Verses used for this teaching are in Jeremiah 23. Why have these verses not happened? Why are we still in exile? Why are we not in Israel? Is it possible that not only are we not ready, but the shepherds spoken of in the first of the chapter are still on their own backsides of deserts being prepared for the day.
What should we take away from this Torah portion? Let us not forget who we are. Not forgetting Whom we belong to. We need to remember the verse in Habakkuk 2:3 used to explain that every promise He has made will come to pass and though from our vantage point it may seem the promises are delayed, from His vantage point, they are right on time.
In the end, just as a remnant of Hebrews were able to grasp that His thoughts and ways would bring forth a greater work than their thoughts and ways could ever do, let us pray for and wait patiently in our day.  (Click to Source)

Torah Commentary -Sh’mot (Names) -The Ultimate Oxymoron – Day 21, Month 10, 5777; 19 January 2017

Torah Commentary
Sh’mot (Names)

Exodus 1:1-6:1
Isaiah 27:6-28:13; 29:22-23
Matthew 22:23-33; 41-46
Acts 3:12-15
Hebrew 11:23-26

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The Ultimate Oxymoron
 
Before I get to what, in my opinion is the ultimate oxymoron, I have a question. Can anyone find a shadow of Messiah in this Torah portion? (Jeopardy theme song playing in background) The answer is pretty obvious on this one. Answer: Who is Moshe! Let’s dig a little deeper. Moshe was actually prophesied in last week’s portion. To see this we will need to look at gematria, the use of letters having numeric meaning. For those whose blood pressure rises with the mention of something like this, not to worry your computer is doing this very thing right now. 
 
Last week we read the “Blessings” given to the twelve sons of Israel. To Judah, he spoke of a staff and one called Shiloh. Literally it says “Yavo Shiloh” or Shiloh will come. These words, as well as the word Messiah, have a numeric value of 358. If we take out the word Yavo and just look at the word Shiloh, it and the word Moshe have a numeric value of 345. From a gematria standpoint, this links Moshe as a type of deliverer foreshadowing the ultimate deliverance in Shiloh or Messiah Yeshua.
 
Now that we all see Moshe is a shadow of Yeshua through gematria, I have two questions. First question, “Why do the people of Israel need to be delivered?” Second question, “Why are they in bondage?” The tribes of Israel are slaves! In my book Israel as slaves is the ultimate oxymoron. (Click to Article)

Torah Commentary – Sh’mot (Exodus) – What Is In Your Hand?

Torah Commentary
Sh’mot (Exodus)
Exodus 1:1-6:1
Isaiah 27:6-28:13; 29:22-23
Matthew 22:23-33; 41-46
Acts 3:12-15
Hebrews 11:23-26
What Is In Your Hand?

Many generations have lived and died since the time of Joseph. To the Hebrews, Caanan is a distant place that is talked about on occasion, but Egypt has become home in their minds. The stories of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are ancient history. Joseph saving Egypt from ruin? It is not doing them much good now. At least not in their minds. God? Well, it does not look like He is too involved in the lives of the Hebrews. Then one night it all changed. The sound of a baby cry in Goshen was very common, but this cry was unique. For those who had ears to hear it could be interpreted, “Pack your bags, it is time to go home!”

Moses, a type and shadow of the One prophesied in Genesis 3 was now alive and well, even growing up in the very house he would one day judge. The only problem with the picture is the man who will be called to deliver the people needs some time tending sheep to truly be ready for the call.

Moses had probably sat at the base of the mountain many times during his years as a shepherd. Little did he realize how much future events on the mountain would change generations to come including the one you and I are living out right now.

The account of the burning bush is very familiar to us all. There is a detail many read over which I would like to expound on. In Chapter 4 Verse 2 Yah asks Moshe a question, “What is that in your hand?’ Now, from my experience, when Yah asks a question, He in not looking for information. He is normally looking for our response. Moshe answers right away and says it is a staff. In the next verses we read what Yah instructs Moshe to do with the staff, part of which is to throw it down whereas it becomes a snake.

I, for one, am not real crazy about snakes. I do not even like the sight of them. Even the ones which are not venomous, I just do not like them. I think my feeling toward serpents would have been a good one for Eve to have, but that is another subject.

What is the connection between the staff and the serpent? In Moshe’s day the staff was where your life was recorded in carvings. It was his autobiography. He would have carved images for various important times in his life. Probably none stuck out more to the eyes of Moshe was the carving of the day he killed the Egyptian. To Moshe it was a symbol of his failure. He who was once called to be the deliverer was forever a failure. What his staff represented was the day he had messed up so bad, hit future was over, the same as if a venomous snake had bitten him.

When Moshe saw the staff turn into a snake it says he recoiled from it. I do not believe he he tried to flee because he was afraid of the snake, but rather he understood what it represented.

Moshe thought his actions years ago had brought death to his calling. This was not the case. His actions had sent him to a place to make him into the man he needed to be, a man who would rely on YH VH and not on himself.

Over the years I have met many people who think something in their past means that Yah can no longer use them. Maybe you are one of them. If that is the case, I have a question for you,”What is that in your hand?” Let’s take a lesson from Moshe. Throw down the image that we may have of failures past. See that image for what it is, a death which keeps us from living our destiny. The staff of Moshe was in a way born again as the old things had passed away and all things had become new. So I ask again, “What is that in your hand?”  (Click to Article)