Prescription Painkillers Tagged as Gateway Drug to Heroin

We believe the God of the Bible is the only one who can heal and take away addiction,but also save you from your sins. Drugs and Eastern mysticism does not and will not work period.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/06/04/heroin-prescription-painkillers.aspx?e_cid=20140604Z1_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_/aahref=http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/06/04/heroin-prescription-painkillers.aspx?e_cid=20140604Z1_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20140604Z1&et_cid=DM45968&et_rid=541759750target=_blankcampaign=20140604Z1&et_cid=DM45968&et_rid=541759750

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Advocates Urge FDA to Revoke Approval of Painkiller Zohydro

More than 40 addiction treatment, health care and consumer groups are urging the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to reverse its decision to approve the prescription painkiller Zohydro ER (extended release), CNN reports.

The drug is a pure form of the painkiller hydrocodone. The FDA approved Zohydro ER in October for patients with pain that requires daily, around-the-clock, long-term treatment that cannot be treated with other drugs. Drugs such as Vicodin contain a combination of hydrocodone and other painkillers such as acetaminophen. Zohydro ER is set to become available in March, the article notes.

In December 2012, a panel of experts assembled by the FDA voted against recommending approval of Zohydro ER. The panel cited concerns over the potential for addiction.

Zohydro is designed to be released over time, and can be crushed and snorted by people seeking a strong, quick high. The opioid drug OxyContin has been reformulated to make it harder to crush or dissolve, but Zohydro does not include similar tamper-resistant features.

In a letter to FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg, the coalition of health groups, wrote, “In the midst of a severe drug epidemic fueled by overprescribing of opioids, the very last thing the country needs is a new, dangerous, high-dose opioid. Too many people have already become addicted to similar opioid medications, and too many lives have been lost.”

The health groups include the American Society of Addiction Medicine, Public Citizen Health Research Group, Phoenix House, the Hazelden Foundation, and Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing.

In December, 28 attorneys general wrote to Commissioner Hamburg, saying they believe the approval of Zohydro ER “has the potential to exacerbate our nation’s prescription drug abuse epidemic because this drug will be the first hydrocodone-only opioid narcotic that is reportedly five to ten times more potent than traditional hydrocodone products, and it has no abuse-deterrent properties.”

Click to http://www.drugfree.org/join-together/advocacy/advocates-urge-fda-to-revoke-approval-of-painkiller-zohydro?utm_source=Join%20Together%20Daily&utm_campaign=30946f5534-JT_Daily_News_The_Affordable_Care_Act&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_97f4d27738-30946f5534-221343641

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NY Attorney General confirms real-life conspiracy among drug companies

(NaturalNews) The office of the New York Attorney General and the American units of Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd. and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. have come to terms on a settlement involving claims that an agreement between the two Big Pharma companies restricted competition unlawfully.

Both companies agreed to pay a small fine (by comparison) of $150,000 to New York State and to cease making similar agreements in the future as part of the settlement, Reuters reported. Neither company admitted or denied the allegations, but the settlement absolves them of having to do so.

By settling, the companies have ended an investigation that was being conducted by the state into an agreement that was signed by both in 2010 to sell a generic version of Pfizer, Inc.’s cholesterol-lowering drug Lipitor in the U.S., while not horning in on the exclusivity rights of other generic drugs sold by the pharmaceutical companies. Per Reuters:

The agreement was drawn up as a contingency plan to allow Israel’s Teva to sell the generic Lipitor, or atorvastatin calcium, in case Ranbaxy’s version was not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration before Lipitor lost its patent protection on November 30, 2011.

While India’s Ranbaxy, majority-owned by Japan’s Daiichi Sankyo Co Ltd, eventually got FDA approval in time, the agreement remained in place and could have been used to protect other drugs made by the two companies.

‘Pay-for-delay’

“Agreements between drug manufacturers to protect each other’s market positions violate fundamental principles of antitrust law, and can lead to higher drug prices,” Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said in a statement.

While the agreement related only to the sale of the one drug, it included a “no-challenge” clause, which allowed both companies to shield from competition, as well as legal and regulatory challenges, scores of other medications, according to the NY attorney general’s office, which added, however, that no anti-competitive effects due to the agreement had been identified during the investigation.

Schneiderman says the entire ordeal represents the application of a recent legal precedent that arose from challenges of “pay-for-delay” agreements that were established between makers of brand-name and generic drugs.

Those deals, where a brand-name Pharma company pays a generic rival not to sell their versions of a drug at a much-reduced price, have caught the attention of regulators in countries all over the world, because such agreements raise patient-care costs as well as the public sector’s costs to cover healthcare treatments.

Criminal enterprise

“Ranbaxy… continues to believe that the agreement was pro-competitive and an important part of making the product readily available to patients and the U.S. healthcare system in a timely fashion,” a Ranbaxy spokesman said in an email to Reuters, but the other company involved, Teva, would not comment.

“The settlement is positive for (Ranbaxy). The settlement amount will not significantly impact the company,” said Sarabjit Kour Nangra, an analyst at Angel Broking, as quoted by the newswire service.

Ranbaxy was banned from exporting drugs to the U.S. after failing to abide by U.S. Food and Drug Administration manufacturing standards.

Natural News has reported on illegal activity committed by Big Pharma companies often in the past. As our editor, Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, has documented, anyone who has labeled the industry as little more than a criminal enterprise has been vindicated time and again. In 2012, Mike wrote:

Drug and vaccine manufacturer Merck was caught red-handed by two of its own scientists faking vaccine efficacy data by spiking blood samples with animal antibodies. GlaxoSmithKline has just been fined a whopping $3 billion for bribing doctors, lying to the FDA, hiding clinical trial data and fraudulent marketing. Pfizer, meanwhile has been sued by the nation’s pharmacy retailers for what is alleged as an “overarching anticompetitive scheme” to keep generic cholesterol drugs off the market and thereby boost its own profits.

This latest settlement with authorities in New York further documents the previous pattern of criminality.

Sources:

http://www.reuters.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

Click to http://www.naturalnews.com/044010_drug_companies_real-life_conspiracy_NY_Attorney_General.html

TeshuvahRoad

New test suggests antidepressant Paxil may promote breast cancer

A team of researchers from the City of Hope in Duarte has developed a speedy way to identify drugs and chemicals that can disrupt the balance of sex hormones in human beings and influence the development and progress of diseases such as breast cancer.

In a trial screening of 446 drugs in wide circulation, the new assay singled out the popular antidepressant paroxetine (better known by its commercial name, Paxil) as having a weak estrogenic effect that could promote the development and growth of breast tumors in women.

This is important because as many as a quarter of women being treated for breast cancer suffer from depression — a condition most commonly treated with antidepressants known as SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), including Paxil, which has been on the market since 1992. Almost a quarter of American women in their 40s and 50s are taking an antidepressant, mostly SSRIs.

Last summer, the Food and Drug Administration approved the marketing of a low dose of paroxetine — repackaged under the commercial name Brisdelle — as a nonhormonal treatment for hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms.

About 70% of breast cancers in women are sensitive to estrogen, meaning that the hormone found plentifully in females of child-bearing age contributes to their growth.

The novel screening method developed at City of Hope, described in a forthcoming issue of the journal Toxicological Sciences, also identified two antifungal medications — biconazole and oxyconazole — as having an anti-estrogenic effect similar to that of medications prescribed to prevent breast cancer and its recurrences in women. Incidental to their intended use in combating fungal infections, those medications inhibit the action of aromatase, an enzyme that converts androgens — hormones more plentiful in males but present in both sexes — into estrogen.

Less surprising, the high-throughput screening mechanism identified bisphenol A — a compound used in the manufacture of plastics and epoxy resins — as an estrogen promoter capable of raising breast cancer risk.

The discovery that Paxil behaves as an endocrine-disrupting chemical may shed light on growing suspicions about the medication in women who have had breast cancer. A 2010 study found that breast cancer patients in Canada who were taking Paxil were more likely than those taking other antidepressants to die of breast cancer when there was a substantial overlap in their use of that antidepressant and of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer recurrence.

The researchers surmised that paroxetine, which was taken by about a quarter of the depressed breast cancer patients in the study, might block the production of a liver enzyme needed to metabolize tamoxifen. The authors of the latest research said paroxetine’s “weak estrogenic” effect “may be responsible, in part, for the observed reduction” in tamoxifen’s effectiveness in that study.

The finding that paroxetine has estrogenic effects “has implications for patients with estrogen-sensitive breast cancer who are on other medications,” said Shiuan Chen, professor and chairman of City of Hope’s department of cancer biology and lead author of the study.

To confirm paroxetine’s estrogenic action, the researchers performed a further analysis that found that many of the genes whose activity is altered by paroxetine are genes that also respond to estrogen. But the researchers said the assay does not show whether the antidepressant medication alters the activity of estrogen directly or by indirect means.

Click to http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-antidepressant-paxil-breast-cancer-20140218,0,3273056.story#axzz2tpBSzmPu

TeshuvahRoad

Pennsylvania ‘Craigslist killer’ says she slayed dozens more across U.S. as part of satanic cult: report

Miranda Barbour, who along with her husband is facing the death penalty for killing a 42-year-old man she met on Craigslist, claimed in a jailhouse interview that she has killed at least 22 other people as a part of her involvement with a satanic cult.

A Pennsylvania newlywed accused of meeting a man on Craigslist and then stabbing him to death with her husband’s help said she killed more than 20 more people as part of her involvement in a bloodthirsty satanic cult.

“When I hit 22, I stopped counting,” 19-year-old Miranda Barbour told the Sunbury, Pa., Daily Item newspaper in a chilling jailhouse interview Friday.

“I can pinpoint on a map where you can find them,” she boasted. “I remember everything. It is like watching a movie.”

Barbour’s claims of serial killer infamy came as she and her husband, Elytte, 22, are facing the death penalty for stabbing Troy LaFerrara to death on Nov. 11 in what investigators called a “thrill kill” to mark the couple’s three-week wedding anniversary.

Miranda lured the lonely 42-year-old with a Craigslist ad offering “companionship,” and the two met in the parking lot of a shopping mall before driving to a spot in Sunbury, authorities said.

Elytte Barbour hid beneath a blanket in the Honda CRV’s backseat and, after receiving a signal from his wife, jumped up and wrapped a cord around the LaFerrara’s neck, prosecutors said.

Miranda then stabbed him 20 times. LeFerrara’s body was found in an alley the next day.

Initially, Barbour told police she stabbed the passenger because he groped her and tried to choke her.

 But on Friday, she admitted to the killing, claiming that LaFerrara “said the wrong things and then things got out of control.”

“I can tell you he was not supposed to be stabbed,” Barbour told the Daily Item. “My husband was just supposed to strangle him.”

Speaking through a jailhouse phone, Barbour told the newspaper LaFerrara was just the latest victim in a multistate killing spree that began at 13 when she joined a satanic cult in Alaska.

The cult’s leader let her tag along on a hit on someone who owed him money, she said.

The unnamed leader shot the man and then handed her the gun to finish him off, she claimed.

“I couldn’t do it, so he came behind me and he took his hands and put them on top of mine and we pulled the trigger,” Barbour said.

“And then from there I just continued to kill.”

The deranged young mom, who has a daughter from a past lover, claimed to have bodies stashed in California, North Carolina and Texas, as well as Alaska, where most of the murders took place.

Her victims, she told the Daily Item, “did bad things and didn’t deserve to be here anymore.”

“I would lure these people in. I studied them. I learned them and even became their friend,” she said.

On Saturday, Sunbury police said they were aware of Barbour’s claims and were looking into them with help from investigators in other states and the FBI.

So far, there were no reports of any evidence linking Barbour or her husband to any other killings.

Barbour said she had no regrets about killing LaFerrara — or any of the other alleged victims.

“If I were to be released, I would do this again,” she told the newspaper.

Click to http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/craigslist-killer-claims-slayed-dozens-part-satanic-cult-report-article-1.1616297

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