Experts Predict Certain Foods Will Become ‘Extinct’ In Grocery Stores As Supply Chain Issues Affect Almost Every Facet Of Shopping – ‘Like A Train Wreck In Slow Motion’ –

By Susan Duclos – All News PipeLine February 2. 2021

We have often said that by the time the establishment media gets around to actually reporting relevant news, rather than practicing liberal activism, the problem is already so far out of control it is pitiful.

Inevitably when speaking of retail shortages and skyrocketing prices, folks say “Not in my area.” 

Some are in areas that have not been affected by the supply chain damage done over the last year of state lockdowns, and they are extremely lucky.

Others have noticed rising prices, less products available and limitations on other products still being implemented. Slow rising prices, each month, incremental as to not be as noticeable, unless compared to pre-COVID years.   

It is when the the actual increases of not just the week or the month, but over the course of the year, are shown, that folks start understanding the “boiling frog” effect.

So, let us begin with the numbers as we know them, and nobody can say only the Independent Media are the only people reporting this, because the following quotes, separated by my commentary, are from the very liberal Washington Post.

• The cost of shipping a container of goods has risen by 80 percent since early November and has nearly tripled over the past year, according to the Freightos Baltic Index

Trickle down inflation, the increase in costs will be covered by consumers with higher prices.

Hypothetical Analogy:  Instead of retailers making $10 profit on a product, now they make $3.00… they aren’t going to eat those costs, they are going to force consumers to pay them by raising prices of those products.

According to the Wapo piece, different spending patterns are what upended the global supply chain.

Key quotes from Wapo, via MSN:• …..The increase reflects dramatic shifts in consumption during the pandemic, as consumers redirect money they once spent at restaurants or movie theaters to the purchase of record amounts of imported clothing, computers, furniture and other goods.

• It’s a global problem, and it may get worse before it gets better. More than one-third of the containers transiting the world’s 20 largest ports last month failed to ship when scheduled, according to Ocean Insights, a data provider.

• Glimmers of sticker shock are starting to vex corporate planners. The cost of imported industrial supplies jumped 4.2 percent in December and is up 27 percent since April’s pandemic low, with manufacturers complaining of shortages of materials such as steel.

They call it “post-covid inflation surge,” we call it “post idiocy surge.” Over-reactions by the global community (aka idiocy) has caused the increases, and the shortages, among other problems that will far outlast the initial issue aka COVID.

In other words, had tyrannical leaders not locked down entire states/countries, the supply chain would not have been interrupted and the change in spending/buying patterns would not have caused such devastating shortages in meats, produce, canned goods, cleaning supplies, paper products, and other basic necessities.

Independent Media warned consistently that the change in supply and demand had overwhelmed the system, yet MSM outlets scoffed at the warnings, yet now, what does the MSM say?

“The surge in demand overwhelmed the system.”

Ya think?

“It seems to be getting worse, not better. I don’t see this ending any time soon,” said Nate Herman, senior vice president for policy at the American Apparel and Footwear Association.

Last year’s stop-and-go global economy effectively shifted 5 million shipping containers from the first half of the year to the second half — on top of customary trade flows, said Lars Jensen, chief executive of SeaIntelligence, a Copenhagen-based consultancy.

“It’s multiple different bottlenecks all at the same time,” Jensen said. “It’s like a train wreck in slow motion.”

The articles goes on to explain shipping issues as well, where at times many container carriers are leaving the port before being loaded up with American products, stating “That practice has irked American farmers, who say the shippers’ refusal to bring containers into the heartland is raising their costs and causing them to lose overseas sales of soybeans, grains and lumber. A coalition of agricultural exporters wrote to Biden transition officials this month complaining of “supply chain dysfunction” and backing an ongoing Federal Maritime Commission probe of shippers’ behavior.” 

One again, either those farmers eat their losses, as they were forced to do at the start of the lockdowns after having to destroy their own crops and livestock, or they sell for a much higher price, to which the retailers raise their prices so the consumers are the ones eating the costs.

It is a viscous cycle and there is no end in sight.

SHORTAGES WILL CONTINUE TO EMERGE

We have noted and uptick of chatter about how variety has been effected, where certain products offered a large number of products have streamlined and are “temporarily” stopping production of some products to increase the manufacturing of more popular products.

This is not new as we started seeing periodical reports in mid-2020,but they were often downplayed or buried beneath the political views of reporters, which would rather focus on their activism than report the news that affects the Americans food stability.

Wall Street Journal in late June of 2020:

Consumer-oriented companies spent the past decades trying to please just about everyone. The pandemic made that impossible, and now some no longer plan to try. Sellers of potato chips, cars, meals and more have been narrowing offerings since the coronavirus snarled supply chains and coaxed consumers back to familiar brands.

The partial list of companies making changes to their products and variety options, include; PepsiCo Inc.’s North America, Frito-Lay, J.M. Smucker Co., Bolthouse Farms, Nestlé SA is permanently dropping some Lean Cuisines varieties, IGA, Darden Restaurants Inc., McDonald’s Corp., Outback Steakhouse owner Bloomin’ Brands Inc, Auto Makers, Harley-Davidson dealers, Tysop Foods and other meat processers, Deschutes Brewery and Bumble Bee foods, are just some of the companies, showing that these supply chain issues have affected almost every aspect of shopping.

Some of the bigger stores in more populated areas also have reorganized their shelving and layout to cram more items in a smaller area as to appear to be “full,” or fuller than they truly are.

Experts are also predicting that certain foods will become “extinct” in grocery stores  such as milk, honey and factory farmed meats.

These are items that can be bought as emergency survival supplies, either in individual cans/packages or in bulk.

While ANP has a frequently updated Still/back in stock page, there are some freeze dried survival foods that are back in stock…at least for now, and those will be listed below.

STILL/BACK IN STOCK

Freeze Dried Survival Foods:

Nutristore Freeze Dried Sausage Crumbles

Nutristore Freeze Dried Chicken 

Nutristore Freeze Dried Ground Beef

Mother Earth Products Dried Vegetable Soup Mix

Hoosier Hill Farm Premium Honey Powder, 1.5 Lb.

It’s Just – Whole Milk Powder, Made in USA

Powdered Whole Milk – Shelf Stable Dry Milk Powder – Dried For Emergency Long Term Food Storage

NOTE : On one of our recent prepper pieces, a regular reader spoke to the difficulty in getting powdered milk to taste good, and following that comment, another reader emailed us at ANP with links to better learn how to use the product in number of ways.

Hi Susan and Stefan

I have been reading your articles for years. Even though I don’t have a profile through disqus,

I very much enjoy the comment section and am very grateful for the extra information I get there.

A couple articles back, someone- can’t remember who- commented on how unappealing powdered milk was. As I have some stored up for the grandkids, I was thinking there has got to be a way to use it.

I am going to send you some articles I found. I am not great with computers but hope you can figure how to use them. We are going to need every source of protein and what better way then knowing the “correct “ way to reconstitute the milk as well as make cheese from it. No bugs for us!

Those links are below:

Mozzarella Recipe with Instant Nonfat Dry Milk | Cheese Making

Delicious Recipes Using Your Stored Powdered Milk

Yogurt to Cottage Cheese: 10 Unknown Uses For Powdered Milk | PrepareAware’s Blog

A huge thank you to our readers for opening up discussions and being so helpful by sending links, images, tips and videos.

The sharing of information without jeopardizing operational security (OPSEC), to help others navigate and learn more about prepping and survival, could actually be the difference between life or death at some point should SHTF.

Appliances: Another area there have been ongoing shortages in, and warnings that those shortages may not end, are kitchen appliances.

Many brands of freezers, refrigerators, dishwashers are still on backorder, whether 

from in-country manufacturing issues, a lack of needed parts coming from different countries, or whatever the reason, the shortages have lasted quite a few months now already.

So if you have the need, want an extra, have an appliance that is on its last legs, get it now, just in case online merchants run into the same issues.

Northair Chest Freezer – 3.5 Cu Ft with 2 Removable Baskets – Reach In Freezer Chest

Arctic King 7.0 cu ft Chest Freezer in Black

 Midea MRC070S0AWW Chest Freezer, 7.0 Cubic Feet, White

COSTWAY Compact Refrigerator, 3.4 cu. ft. Classic Fridge with Adjustable Removable Glass Shelves

Frigidaire FFTR1821TS 30 Inch Freestanding Top Freezer Refrigerator with 18 cu. ft. Total Capacity, in Stainless Steel

Frigidaire FGSC2335TF Gallery Series 36 Inch Freestanding Counter Depth Side by Side Refrigerator with 22.2 cu. ft. Capacity, in Stainless Steel

RCA RFR786-RED 2 Door Apartment Size Refrigerator with Freezer, 7.5 cu. ft, Retro Red

24” Built-in Dishwasher, 24 inch, Black Stainless Steel

EdgeStar BIDW1802SS 18 Inch Wide 8 Place Setting Energy Star Rated Built-In Dishwasher

Frigidaire 4-Pcs Kitchen Package with FGHB2868TD 36″Fridge, FGEF3059TD 30″ Elec. Range, FGMV155CTD 30″ Over-the-Range Microwave and FGID2466QD 24″ Fully Integ. Dishwasher in Black Stainless Steel


For other foods, paper products, medicines and more, check out our Still/Back in stock page.

BOTTOM LINE

The media has downplayed the severity of the warnings about past shortages and what they did to the already strained supply, as well as the predictions of more upcoming shortages and items already delayed for delivery after ordering them.

While many aren’t noticing how bad the issue is right now, the quotes seen in articles dealing with these shortages past, present and expected, shows that those in the industries, whether appliances, foods, or paper products are calling this a “train wreck.” (Click to Source)

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