2nd wave of locusts could hit one-third of world’s nations, warning says

Swarm can eat as much in a day as 35,000 people can eat

When billions of locusts stripped hundreds of square miles of African croplands a few weeks ago, there were warnings it might get worse.

Now, a second wave is about to descend that has the potential to damage the food and economic security of a tenth of the world’s population.

The worldwide Christian charity Barnabas Fund noted the desert locust is considered the most dangerous migratory pest on earth.

“A swarm of only one square kilometer will eat as much as 35,000 people can eat in one day. In times of plague, desert locusts can spread across around 29 million square kilometer – extending to around 60 countries – or more than 20% of the total land surface of the planet,” Barnabas Fund said.

“Many thousands of people were already in the grip of food shortages, due to either drought or flooding in the last twelve months, before the crop destruction caused by a first wave of vast swarms of desert locusts in East Africa and Pakistan earlier this year,” the report said.

And this time around, it could be 400 times worse. The United Nations estimates 20 million are facing the threat of severe “food insecurity.”

The breeding activity for desert locusts in Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia is threatening “millions.”

“Crops are due to be harvested in the next few weeks, but already in Uganda, “the government has warned the country to prepare for impending double disaster as unusually heavy seasonal rains are expected.” A Christian leader explained to Barnabas that the severe rains will increase the risks of a locust plague.

Normally, the locusts are in parts of Africa, the Middle East and Asia, an area of about 16 million square kilometers.

“A second wave of this year’s devastating locust outbreak is under way in summer breeding grounds in East Africa, parts of the Middle East and south-west Asia. Breeding conditions for the locusts have remained highly favorable since February along both Red Sea coasts and in East Africa. Heavy rains fell in southern Iran spurring egg laying. Western Africa, where dry conditions have dominated, remains largely unaffected by the locust swarms,” the report said.

And similar breeding patterns have been found in Ethiopia, Sudan, Eritrea, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the UAE.

The report noted the only effective means to battle the plague is aerial insecticide spraying, mainly with organophosphate chemicals. But the cost, at least $60 million, is unworkable for some nations.

“A swarm of only one square kilometer will eat as much as 35,000 people can eat in one day. In times of plague, desert locusts can spread across around 29 million square kilometer – extending to around 60 countries – or more than 20% of the total land surface of the planet,” Barnabas Fund said.

“Many thousands of people were already in the grip of food shortages, due to either drought or flooding in the last twelve months, before the crop destruction caused by a first wave of vast swarms of desert locusts in East Africa and Pakistan earlier this year,” the report said.

And this time around, it could be 400 times worse. The United Nations estimates 20 million are facing the threat of severe “food insecurity.”

The breeding activity for desert locusts in Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia is threatening “millions.”

“Crops are due to be harvested in the next few weeks, but already in Uganda, “the government has warned the country to prepare for impending double disaster as unusually heavy seasonal rains are expected.” A Christian leader explained to Barnabas that the severe rains will increase the risks of a locust plague.

Normally, the locusts are in parts of Africa, the Middle East and Asia, an area of about 16 million square kilometers.

“A second wave of this year’s devastating locust outbreak is under way in summer breeding grounds in East Africa, parts of the Middle East and south-west Asia. Breeding conditions for the locusts have remained highly favorable since February along both Red Sea coasts and in East Africa. Heavy rains fell in southern Iran spurring egg laying. Western Africa, where dry conditions have dominated, remains largely unaffected by the locust swarms,” the report said.

And similar breeding patterns have been found in Ethiopia, Sudan, Eritrea, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the UAE.

The report noted the only effective means to battle the plague is aerial insecticide spraying, mainly with organophosphate chemicals. But the cost, at least $60 million, is unworkable for some nations. (Click to Source)

Modern English Version Large Print

 

victorytelemedicine-brochure-coronavirus-for-blogs

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s