Major Hurricane Irma to brush northern Caribbean as it tracks toward the US this week

 And there will be signs in the sun and moon and stars; and upon the earth [there will be] distress (trouble and anguish) of nations in bewilderment and perplexity [without resources, left wanting, embarrassed, in doubt, not knowing which way to turn] at the roaring (the echo) of the tossing of the sea,

Men swooning away or expiring with fear and dread and apprehension and expectation of the things that are coming on the world; for the [very] powers of the heavens will be shaken and caused to totter.

(Luke 21:25-26) Amplified Bible, Classic Edition (AMPC)

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Major Hurricane Irma will skirt across the northern Caribbean islands with flooding rain, damaging winds and dangerous seas before eyeing the East Coast of the United States this week.

“Irma is a serious threat for the Caribbean islands and United States,” AccuWeather Lead Long-Range Meteorologist Paul Pastelok said.

Irma, currently a Category 3 hurricane, poses an imminent risk to the northernmost Leeward Islands. Preparations for the storm should already be taking place in these areas.

“Rain and gusty winds may start as early as Tuesday,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Rob Miller said.

Irma has been fluctuating in intensity over the past few days, but is expected to strengthen to a Category 4 hurricane with sustained winds of 130-156 mph (209-251 km/h) on its closest approach to the islands.

The storm will turn to the north and west over the coming days. This track will put Antigua and Barbuda, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, Anguilla and the British Virgin Islands, in the brunt of the storm’s rain and wind spanning Tuesday and Wednesday.

Power outages and damage to trees and structures are possible, even if the center of Irma misses the islands to the north.

Rainfall could be heavy enough to trigger flash flooding, mudslides and road washouts.

“Severe effects from the storm may be limited to a radius 50 miles (80 km) of the center, while the storm moves through the tropics,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said.

Rough surf will spread outward from the storm, leading to dangerous swimming and boating conditions along the east-facing beaches of the Lesser Antilles. Small craft should head to port and remain there until Irma has passed. (Click to Site)

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