The West’s Real Bigotry: Rejecting Persecuted Christians

isisz

  • “Unfortunately, the West has rejected the idea of solidarity with the Christians of the Middle East, prioritizing diplomacy based on oil interests and the Arab-Israeli conflict. Thus, the United States, Britain, and France have largely ignored the persecutions of the Christians of Iraq, Lebanon, Egypt, and Sudan, while rushing to save the oil-rich Muslim states of Saudi Arabia and Kuwait…” — Hannibal Travis, Professor of Law, 2006.
  • Indigenous Christians in Iraq and Syria have not only been exposed to genocide at the hands of the Islamic State and other Islamist groups, but also their applications for immigration to Western countries have been put on the back-burner by, shamefully but not surprisingly, the UN.
  • When one brings up the issue of Western states taking in Muslim migrants from Syria and Iraq without vetting them for jihadist ties, while leaving behind the Christian and Yazidi victims of jihadists, one is accused of being “bigoted” or “racist”. But the real bigotry is abandoning the persecuted and benign Middle Eastern Christians and Yazidis, the main victims of the ongoing genocides in Syria and Iraq.
  • The German government is also rejecting applications for asylum of Christian refugees and deporting them unfairly, according to a German pastor.
  • Nearly a third of the respondents said that most of the discrimination and violence came mostly from refugee camp guards of Muslim descent.
  • It is high time that not only the U.S. but all other Western governments finally saw that the Christians in the Middle East are them.

Finally, after years of apathy and inaction, Washington is extending a much-needed helping hand to Middle Eastern Christians. U.S. President Donald Trump recently announced that persecuted Christians will be given priority when it comes to applying for refugee status in the United States.

Christians and Yazidis are being exposed to genocide at the hands of ISIS and other Islamist groups, who have engaged in a massive campaign to enslave the remnant non-Muslim minorities and to destroy their cultural heritage.

The scholar Hannibal Travis wrote in 2006:

“Unfortunately, the West has rejected the idea of solidarity with the Christians of the Middle East, prioritizing diplomacy based on oil interests and the Arab-Israeli conflict. Thus, the United States, Britain, and France have largely ignored the persecutions of the Christians of Iraq, Lebanon, Egypt, and Sudan, while rushing to save the oil-rich Muslim states of Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, as well as besieged minority Kurds, Bosnians, and Kosovars. To this day, American troops in Iraq reportedly do not always intervene against the persecution of Christians, perhaps not wanting to be seen as ‘siding with the Christians’ and thus provoke retaliation.”

Then, the so-called liberals in the West — and even Christians — started pushing back against the move.

Indigenous Christians in Iraq and Syria have not only been exposed to genocide at the hands of the Islamic State (ISIS) and other Islamist groups but also their applications for immigration to Western countries have been put on the back burner by, shamefully but not surprisingly, the UN.

A group of Armenians from Iraq, for example, have fled their homes in Iraq after ISIS came. Instead they have gone to Yozgat, Turkey. The newspaper Agos ran a story about them on 21 December, 2015:

“They live in hard conditions. The UN could not schedule any appointment for immigration application before 2022. They don’t know how they can live in these conditions for 7 years. The only thing they want is to meet with their relatives.”

Yozgat, one of the Anatolian cities where Armenians were exposed to the most horrific murders and exile at the hands of Muslims during the 1915 genocide, is where Armenians find themselves again, this time struggling to survive in the midst of unemployment, poverty, harassment, intolerance, and illness.

Şant Garabedyan, 23, said that no jobs are given to Christians:

“I have been in Yozgat for two months. We are eight people in the same house…. Nobody hires me, because I am a Christian. My wife is Chaldean and doesn’t wear her pectoral cross because she is afraid.”

Alis Şalcıyan said that they left Iraq fearing ISIS.

“We have been here for a year. Back in Baghdad, we felt frightened, when ISIS came to Iraq…. Someone on the street saw my necklace and spat while looking into my eyes. After that, I took it off and kept it at home…. We filed an immigration application with the UN, but they scheduled an appointment for 2022, although they scheduled appointments for the next year for others. We must wait here for seven years.”

Ğazar Setrakyan said that they left Baghdad the night ISIS came to the city: “When ISIS militants came to Baghdad, they wrote ‘house of Christians’ on our door. It was impossible to stay there. We left our home and three shops, and we ran away.”

Lusin Sarkisyan said that her son, who had worked for Americans in Iraq, was targeted by ISIS. “One day, ISIS militants threatened my son saying that they would kill his family if he continues to work with Americans. We had to run away.”

Sarkisyan added that the UN officials scheduled an appointment for an immigration application for 2018. “I do not know what we are going to do until then.”

Even when European states take in Christian refugees, they fail to protect them from the attacks of Muslims in refugee housing facilities.

According to the findings of a survey from the Christian advocacy group Open Doors USA, refugees of Christian and Yazidi descent who fled persecution in places like Syria and Iraq keep facing other religiously motivated attacks in Germany.

Since February 2016, nearly 800 Christians and Yazidi refugees were attacked by others at the relief centers and camps, according to a report entitled, “Lack of protection for religious minorities in Germany” conducted from 15 February to 30 September, 2016.

“When questioned about the nature of the attacks, assault was named most often, followed by death threats, either directed directly at the Christian refugees or their family in Germany or in their home countries.

“44 people indicated that they had been victims of sexual assaults. Other forms of persecution include insults, general threats, and physical attacks that had not been defined as an assault. 11% of those questioned felt intimidated by loud music/prayers.” (Click to Article)

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s