Occult History of the Third Reich

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The Ahnenerbe was a scientific institute in the Third Reich dedicated to research the archaeological and cultural history of the Aryan Race.
Founded on July 1, 1935, by Heinrich Himmler, Herman Wirth, and Richard Walther Darré, the Ahnenerbe later conducted experiments and launched expeditions in an attempt to prove that Aryan Nordic populations had once ruled the world.
Its name came from an obscure German word, ‘Ahnenerbe‘, meaning “inherited from the forefathers.”
The official mission of the Ahnenerbe was to find new evidence of the racial superiority of the Germanic people through historical, anthropological, and archaeological research.
Formally, the group was called the Studiengesellschaft für Geistesurgeschichte‚ Deutsches Ahnenerbe – ‘Study Society for Primordial Intellectual history, German Ancestral Heritage’, but it was renamed in 1937 as the Forschungs- und Lehrgemeinschaft das Ahnenerbe – (Research and Teaching Community of the Ancestral Heritage).
Many of their interests extended beyond science into occultism.

This led to German scientists travelling around the world in search of Atlantis and the Holy Grail, and it is reported that the Ahnenerbe sought “portals” to God.
Growing out of the Ahnenerbe-SS, the Thule Gesellschaft and the general Nazi interest in the occult, was ‘Karotechia’ (see below) – a secret organization dedicated to the research and use of occult forces for the Third Reich.

Hermann Wirth (see left) was a Dutch historian obsessed with Atlantean mythology, and Richard Walter Darré (see right) was the creator of National Socialist ‘Blut und Boden’ (blood and soil) ideology, and was head of the Race and Settlement Office).

BLUT UND BODEN

Blut und Boden refers to an ideology that focuses on ethnicity based on two factors, descent (Blood of a Volk) and Heimat (Homeland – Soil).
It celebrates the relationship of a people to the land they occupy and cultivate, and it places a high value on the virtues of rural living.
The German expression was coined in the late 19th century, in tracts espousing racialism and national romanticism.
It produced a regionalist literature, with some social criticism.
This romantic attachment was widespread prior to the rise of National Socialism.
Ultranationalists, predating National Socialism, often supported ‘country living’ as more healthy, with the ‘Artaman League‘ sending urban children to the countryside to work in part in hopes of transforming them into ‘Wehrbaueren‘ (Soldier-farmers). (Click to Article)

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